Head on crash, need wheel rebuild?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Anonymous, May 31, 2003.

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  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Hey all,

    My front wheel was involved in a head on crash. Probably a 12-15 mph slam. It is very slightly out
    of round. 24 radial spoked Velocity Deep V.

    What is the procedure from here? Full rebuild? Simple rerounding? Some sort of spoke testing?

    Thanks, Doug
     
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  2. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Doug" wrote:
    > My front wheel was involved in a head on crash. Probably a 12-15 mph slam. It is very slightly out
    > of round. 24 radial spoked Velocity Deep V.
    >
    > What is the procedure from here? Full rebuild? Simple rerounding? Some sort of spoke testing?

    I'd be more worried about the fork and frame. Have it checked out by a competent shop.

    As for the wheel, have the shop try to true it. The rim may need to be replaced.

    Art Harris
     
  3. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    news:[email protected]...
    > Hey all,
    >
    > My front wheel was involved in a head on crash. Probably a 12-15 mph slam. It is very slightly out
    > of round. 24 radial spoked Velocity Deep V.
    >
    > What is the procedure from here? Full rebuild? Simple rerounding? Some sort of spoke testing?
    >
    > Thanks, Doug

    Deep V rims are very hard to correct when they become out of round (up and down). The rims are
    usually heavier and stronger than a regular, non-aero style wheel. You can try and have that
    repaired and they might be able to get it close to normal, but I'm not sure it will ever be 100%
    round again. Don't worry about the spokes. Complete rebuild is dependent on the outcome of the
    trueing attempt and your personal level of acceptance for things that aren't quite right! For the
    $50 or whatever it's going to cost you to repair that wheel, if it's only a 1/16" or something of up
    and down, I think I could live with that. Others, maybe not. And, as others suggested, be sure to
    check the hub for cracks, the frame and fork for bends or cracks. Hitting something solid at 15mph
    is a serious blow to the bike.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  4. > My front wheel was involved in a head on crash. Probably a 12-15 mph slam. It is very slightly out
    > of round. 24 radial spoked Velocity Deep V.

    I don't know how much "very slightly" is. Do you mean a few mm's or or a couple of cm's?

    > What is the procedure from here? Full rebuild? Simple rerounding? Some sort of spoke testing?

    I've seen plenty of front wheels that were still perfectly fine after the cyclist ran into a parked
    car. Bicycle wheels are suprisingly strong in the vertical plane. Without seeing your front wheel I
    can't comment on your particluar situation but I've seen a lot of wheels survive this sort of
    collision with little or no damage. To be safe you might want to have someone have a look at your
    wheel though.

    ride with the wind...

    Bruce
    --
    Bruce Jackson - Sr. Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group company
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Bruce Jackson" wrote:

    > I've seen plenty of front wheels that were still perfectly fine after the cyclist ran into a
    > parked car. Bicycle wheels are suprisingly strong in the vertical plane.

    Good point. I was once hit head on by a wrong way cyclist. My forks were bent and the down tube
    dimpled, but wheel didn't even go out of true.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 1 Jun 2003 07:32:10 -0700, [email protected] (Bruce Jackson) wrote:

    >I've seen plenty of front wheels that were still perfectly fine after the cyclist ran into a
    >parked car.

    I've seen plenty of crashed wheels, some damaged or destroyed. I've also seen worn, tired and
    fractured wheels.

    But I don't recall ever seeing one with a non-obvious failure (like a cracked rim) that was
    traceable to a single large impact. Smashes make pretzels, fatigue makes hairlines.

    Would it be a reasonable and safe blanket assumption to make that a crash either trashed the wheel
    visibly, or is nothing much to worry about ? Opinions ?
     
  7. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Andy Dingley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 1 Jun 2003 07:32:10 -0700, [email protected] (Bruce Jackson) wrote:
    >
    > >I've seen plenty of front wheels that were still perfectly fine after the cyclist ran into a
    > >parked car.
    >
    > I've seen plenty of crashed wheels, some damaged or destroyed. I've also seen worn, tired and
    > fractured wheels.
    >
    > But I don't recall ever seeing one with a non-obvious failure (like a cracked rim) that was
    > traceable to a single large impact. Smashes make pretzels, fatigue makes hairlines.
    >
    > Would it be a reasonable and safe blanket assumption to make that a crash either trashed the wheel
    > visibly, or is nothing much to worry about ? Opinions ?

    I cracked a rear mountain bike rim (Mavic X517) at the spoke hole with one major impact. Sharp edge,
    dented the rim some, and caused a small crack at a nearby spoke hole (going widthwise). The crack
    did grow with fatigue, but I still managed to eek out 2.5 months of riding and one race on it ;)

    Jon Bond
     
  8. On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 02:13:55 +0100, Andy Dingley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On 1 Jun 2003 07:32:10 -0700, [email protected] (Bruce Jackson) wrote:
    >
    >>I've seen plenty of front wheels that were still perfectly fine after the cyclist ran into a
    >>parked car.

    I ran into a car at 30 kph once.. bent the fork over backwards so far, that the rear surface of the
    tyre, the fender, and the downtube were in intimate contact. A replacement fork let the bike do its
    work as a clunker for another couple years unbtil I left it with the keys in one not-so-fine day..

    >Would it be a reasonable and safe blanket assumption to make that a crash either trashed the wheel
    >visibly, or is nothing much to worry about ? Opinions ?

    If you hit something relatively sharp, like a curb, you might get a dent in the rim, maybe. Not
    necessarily one that shows up terribly visually, but maybe just one that kills equality of tension
    between spokes.. I've had that happen, without any obvious causes, apart from hitting the
    occasional bump.

    Jasper
     
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