Hominy

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Louis Cohen, Mar 10, 2004.

  1. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole kernels
    in pozole or ground into grits, is corn from which the hull
    and germ have been removed, either mechanically, or
    chemically (typically with lye). But why?

    Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or whole
    corn kernels?

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8'
    42.8"
     
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  2. "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole
    > kernels in pozole or ground into grits, is corn from which
    > the hull and germ have been removed, either mechanically,
    > or chemically (typically with lye). But why?

    I'd say it's for the flavor and texture. Check this out:

    http://www.zarela.com/new_recipes/nixtamal.html

    >
    > Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or
    > whole corn
    kernels?
    >

    AFAIK, those are simply ground dried corn.

    Jack Corny
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole
    > kernels in pozole or ground into grits, is corn from which
    > the hull and germ have been removed, either mechanically,
    > or chemically (typically with lye). But why?
    >
    > Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or
    > whole corn
    kernels?
    >

    I believe that the lye is an essential part of the process.
    When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the amino acids in
    the corn are changed to other amino acids and as a result
    hominy is nutritionally superior to regular corn,
    particularly for people who do not each much meat.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  4. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Louis Cohen wrote:
    > We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole
    > kernels in pozole or ground into grits, is corn from which
    > the hull and germ have been removed, either mechanically,
    > or chemically (typically with lye). But why?

    To puff up the corn and make it more of a substantial meal
    for a family. Also, back in the day, they didn't consider
    the 'bran' to be worth much. I'm still not sure how much
    it's worth. Hominy still has the germ of the corn intact.

    > Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or
    > whole corn kernels?

    I guess it depends on where you buy them. I don't know
    anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy; it's an entirely
    different process to grind corn than it is to soak it in lye
    first. Whole corn kernels, if presented as such, should be
    simply that. Corn kernels.

    Jill
     
  5. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole
    > > kernels in pozole or ground into grits, is corn from
    > > which the hull and germ have been removed, either
    > > mechanically, or chemically (typically with lye).
    > > But why?
    > >
    > > Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or
    > > whole corn
    > kernels?
    > >
    >
    > I believe that the lye is an essential part of the
    > process. When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the
    > amino acids in the corn are changed to other amino acids
    > and as a result hominy is nutritionally superior to
    > regular corn, particularly for people who do not each
    > much meat.

    Close but not quite, Peter. Hominy is still an incomplete
    protein source due to the lack of the amino acid lysine.
    Alkaline (as lime, calcium hydroxide) treatment of corn
    actually liberates niacin from protein and makes it more
    available. This is why the niacin deficiency disease
    pellagra was so common in the southern US before flour was
    enriched. Poor folks were eating a corn- (not hominy) based
    diet and not getting sufficient niacin as a result. Mexican
    corn tortillas are made from ground dried hominy, so
    pellagra was less common in that population.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  6. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I guess it depends on where you buy them. I don't know
    > anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy; it's an entirely
    > different process to grind corn than it is to soak it in
    > lye first. Whole corn kernels, if presented as such,
    > should be simply that. Corn kernels.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Aren't corn tortillas made from flour made from lye soaked
    corn...Or is that Lime soaked corn?

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on
    nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  7. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Cindy Fuller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, "Peter
    > Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > We all know that hominy, whether presented in whole
    > > > kernels in pozole
    or
    > > > ground into grits, is corn from which the hull and
    > > > germ have been
    removed,
    > > > either mechanically, or chemically (typically with
    > > > lye). But why?
    > > >
    > > > Are conventional cornmeal/polenta made from hominy? Or
    > > > whole corn
    > > kernels?
    > > >
    > >
    > > I believe that the lye is an essential part of the
    > > process. When the
    corn is
    > > exposed to lye, some of the amino acids in the corn are
    > > changed to other amino acids and as a result hominy is
    > > nutritionally superior to regular corn, particularly for
    > > people who do not each much meat.
    >
    > Close but not quite, Peter. Hominy is still an incomplete
    > protein source due to the lack of the amino acid lysine.
    > Alkaline (as lime, calcium hydroxide) treatment of corn
    > actually liberates niacin from protein and makes it more
    > available. This is why the niacin deficiency disease
    > pellagra was so common in the southern US before flour was
    > enriched. Poor folks were eating a corn- (not hominy)
    > based diet and not getting sufficient niacin as a result.
    > Mexican corn tortillas are made from ground dried hominy,
    > so pellagra was less common in that population.
    >

    Thannks - I looked into it and see that you are correct.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  8. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy

    That's what grits is, no?
     
  9. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy

    That's what grits is, no?
     
  10. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >I believe that the lye is an essential part of the process.
    >When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the amino acids in
    >the corn are changed to other amino acids and as a result
    >hominy is nutritionally superior to regular corn

    I don't know about the amino acid claim, but that's my
    understanding, too, that the lye process somehow makes more
    of the protein available. Similar to what's done to the form
    of corn used to make tortillas.

    Neil
     
  11. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >I believe that the lye is an essential part of the process.
    >When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the amino acids in
    >the corn are changed to other amino acids and as a result
    >hominy is nutritionally superior to regular corn

    I don't know about the amino acid claim, but that's my
    understanding, too, that the lye process somehow makes more
    of the protein available. Similar to what's done to the form
    of corn used to make tortillas.

    Neil
     
  12. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    WardNA wrote:
    >> I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    >
    > That's what grits is, no?

    No, grits are not the same as cornmeal.
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    WardNA wrote:
    >> I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    >
    > That's what grits is, no?

    No, grits are not the same as cornmeal.
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    WardNA wrote:

    > >I believe that the lye is an essential part of the
    > >process. When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the
    > >amino acids in the corn are changed to other amino acids
    > >and as a result hominy is nutritionally superior to
    > >regular corn
    >
    > I don't know about the amino acid claim, but that's my
    > understanding, too, that the lye process somehow makes
    > more of the protein available. Similar to what's done to
    > the form of corn used to make tortillas.
    >

    People were making hominy from corn long before they
    understood the chemistry of nutrition. From what I have been
    able to find out about it, the lye water causes the shells
    to separate from the kernels. It also removes the little
    black eyes. The alternative to lye "cooking" is to steam the
    corn to remove the husk.
     
  15. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    WardNA wrote:

    > >I believe that the lye is an essential part of the
    > >process. When the corn is exposed to lye, some of the
    > >amino acids in the corn are changed to other amino acids
    > >and as a result hominy is nutritionally superior to
    > >regular corn
    >
    > I don't know about the amino acid claim, but that's my
    > understanding, too, that the lye process somehow makes
    > more of the protein available. Similar to what's done to
    > the form of corn used to make tortillas.
    >

    People were making hominy from corn long before they
    understood the chemistry of nutrition. From what I have been
    able to find out about it, the lye water causes the shells
    to separate from the kernels. It also removes the little
    black eyes. The alternative to lye "cooking" is to steam the
    corn to remove the husk.
     
  16. Bob

    Bob Guest

    WardNA wrote:

    >>I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    >
    > That's what grits is, no?

    Yep. And you can also find it in several specific shapes
    and sizes of grind. My current fave is dried, flaked
    hominy. Little flat bullets of hominy that cook up to a polenta-
    like consistency. Cooled, sliced and fried makes a good
    base for hearty stews or as a perfectly wonderful butter-
    delivery vehicle.

    Pastorio
     
  17. Bob

    Bob Guest

    WardNA wrote:

    >>I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    >
    > That's what grits is, no?

    Yep. And you can also find it in several specific shapes
    and sizes of grind. My current fave is dried, flaked
    hominy. Little flat bullets of hominy that cook up to a polenta-
    like consistency. Cooled, sliced and fried makes a good
    base for hearty stews or as a perfectly wonderful butter-
    delivery vehicle.

    Pastorio
     
  18. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > WardNA wrote:
    > >> I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    > >
    > > That's what grits is, no?
    >
    > No, grits are not the same as cornmeal.
    >
    >

    Grits and cornmeal *are* the same - you make grits by
    cooking cornmeal in water to get a mush. If the cornmeal was
    ground from hominy rather than regular corn then you have
    hominy grits.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  19. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > WardNA wrote:
    > >> I don't know anyone who grinds cornmeal from hominy
    > >
    > > That's what grits is, no?
    >
    > No, grits are not the same as cornmeal.
    >
    >

    Grits and cornmeal *are* the same - you make grits by
    cooking cornmeal in water to get a mush. If the cornmeal was
    ground from hominy rather than regular corn then you have
    hominy grits.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  20. Bubbabob

    Bubbabob Guest

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I don't know about the amino acid claim, but that's my
    >> understanding, too, that the lye process somehow makes
    >> more of the protein available. Similar to what's done to
    >> the form of corn used to make tortillas.
    >>
    >
    Lime, rather than lye, is used for corn masa, posole, etc.
    There's a subtle flavor difference (in lime's favor).

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