I Hate Clothes



J

Job Donjon

Guest
Am I the only walker who overheats? Even the flimsiest of jackets causes me discomfort, be it in
Scotland, the Alps or even the Lake District!!

A stroll with the dog around Loweswater today saw me down to a t-shirt.....I certainly don't
consider myself "hard" but I really do not understand the perceived need for Arctic gear in
temperatures well above zero!

Martell, the cave explorer, used to deliberately expose himself (!!!!) to extremes in order to
toughen himself for difficult explorations. Are we losing this?? Are we becoming too "soft" ???

Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk had
more gear than George Fisher!
 
F

Fran

Guest
[email protected] said...
> Am I the only walker who overheats?
>
No you're not. There's a path near my home where I often stroll up the 'mountain' with my children -
and they and I are familiar with every bit of that path, including the places where one might remove
a T-shirt and dunk it in the river before putting it back on, soaking wet and perishing cold. When I
get very cold I'm quite capable of 'forgetting' to warm up again, but most of the time I'm either
comfy or too flippin' hot.
--
Fran If you need my email address please ask.
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
job donjon wrote:

> Am I the only walker who overheats? Even the flimsiest of jackets causes me discomfort,
>
> I really do not understand the perceived need for Arctic gear in temperatures well above zero!

I don't like to wear too much when walking. I remember one sub-zero winter stroll in the Rhinogs
where I was wearing just three layers, a thermal base layer, fleece and trousers, and waterproof
jacket and overtrousers (the latter was to keep out the gale force wind). I felt quite comfortable
all day, never felt cold, even though I wasn't really wearing much. The waterproofs did their job of
keeping out the very strong wind .

At one point I was passed by a small group of fell runners and I felt overdressed in comparison,
they seemed to be wearing far too little for the conditions, but of course they were moving fast.

When stationary though, I do feel the cold, so I need a lot more clothing for hanging around a
campsite in cold weather, but not much when actually moving.

Paul
--
Calendars for 2004
http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk/cal/cal.html
http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
 
P

Phil Cook

Guest
On 24 Jan 2004 18:22:14 -0600, job donjon wrote:

>Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk had
>more gear than George Fisher!

Must have been "serious walkers" :)
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
 
S

Steve Jones

Guest
> Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk
> had more gear than George Fisher!

Bob - are they 'walkey types' or are they really 'all the gear, no idea' types with all the right
brands to be seen in? Have a look at their feet - if they have top quality mountaineering boots in
pristine condition, then I don't think I'd trust them in the South Downs, let alone the Lake
District. Also, I don't think you would have seen many 'real' walkers with battered & muddy boots as
they would want to be out on the fells during daylight. Having said that, if I pass through a town
on a walk, I do tend to cover up, not coz I'm a wimp, but I don't want to inflict my body odour on
the local populace.

Steve
 
C

Craven Birds

Guest
A

Andyp

Guest
"Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote

> When stationary though, I do feel the cold, so I need a lot more clothing for hanging around a
> campsite in cold weather, but not much when actually moving.

Someone told me recently that Buddhist monks can stay warm sitting naked in snow by meditation and
breathing exercises. Apparently trainee monks have some competition to see how many tea towels they
can dry out draped over their body whilst doing so...or something like that. Must learn how to do
that, think how much weight you could save backpacking.
 
B

Bruce Mardle

Guest
job donjon <[email protected]> writes:
> Martell, the cave explorer, used to deliberately expose himself (!!!!) to extremes in order to
> toughen himself for difficult explorations. Are we losing this?? Are we becoming too "soft" ???

I seem to remember a TV programme from a few years ago about a team that set about acclimating
themselves to cold. They found that they did adapt: the circulation to their extremities dropped
more. So, less chance of hypothermia, but more chance of frostbite.
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
job donjon <[email protected]> writes:
> Am I the only walker who overheats? Even the flimsiest of jackets causes me discomfort, be it in
> Scotland, the Alps or even the Lake District!!

How old are you? (no reply required:)

I don't like wearing so much as to cause me to sweat. If I'm going to sweat, then let it be into at
most a comfortable T-shirt that can take it without stinking. But I do wear more than I did when I
was younger, and am helped by the knowledge that a fleece can cope with it.

> A stroll with the dog around Loweswater today saw me down to a t-shirt.....

Sounds right to me, at least before I went to Italy and got my metabolism screwed up:-(

--
Nick Kew
 
M

Martin Richards

Guest
In message <[email protected]>, Craven Birds <[email protected]> writes
>
>"Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> On 24 Jan 2004 18:22:14 -0600, job donjon wrote:
>>
>> >Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk
>> >had more gear than George Fisher!
>>
>> Must have been "serious walkers" :)
>
>What makes a serious walker then?
>
Walking round Keswick, Ambleside, Betwys--Coed, Fort William or Aviemore wearing the latest branded
walking gear spotlessly clean and without a hint of a scuff - especially on the well polished boots.

--
Martin Richardson
216/284 Munros (34/34 'Furths')
217/89 Donalds 397/1552 Marilyns 439/439 Nuttalls
 
R

Rj Webb

Guest
>> Must have been "serious walkers" :)
>
>What makes a serious walker then?
>

Dont worry... Its an old running joke here... Refers to threads long gone by.

Richard Webb
 
C

Craven Birds

Guest
"Martin Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In message <[email protected]>, Craven Birds <[email protected]> writes
> >
> >"Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]...
> >> On 24 Jan 2004 18:22:14 -0600, job donjon wrote:
> >>
> >> >Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type
> >> >folk had more gear than George Fisher!
> >>
> >> Must have been "serious walkers" :)
> >
> >What makes a serious walker then?
> >
> Walking round Keswick, Ambleside, Betwys--Coed, Fort William or Aviemore wearing the latest
> branded walking gear spotlessly clean and without a hint of a scuff - especially on the well
> polished boots.

Those type of walker used to be called posers many years ago;-) IIRC

CB
--
Craven Birds

Bird sightings based around 'Craven' Skipton, North Yorks. http://cravenbirds.mysite.freeserve.com/
http://mysite.freeserve.com/cravenbirds
 
J

Jiffy

Guest
On the 28th of last month I went up the tourist path on Ben Nevis. I wore a Pasramo Cascada
trousers, a thin dryflo top and a Paramo Velez smock. It was a cold day with the temperature
dropping well below zero as the height increased. However, it wasn't until 950m altitude, with knee
deep snow, that I put an extra layer on.

I could have benefited from a bit more clothing on the summit where the windchill really brought the
temperatures down to something like -15c or even -20c (frozen eyelashes, ice buildup on GPS, etc)
but it wasn't too bad. I think the real danger lies in when a situation arises in which you are
unable to keep moving. No longer do you generate enough heat and you quickly get cold. That's why
I've taken to carrying a down jacket with me, as well as a survival bag, in the depths of winter.

Cheers, Jiffy
 
G

Gordon

Guest
job donjon <[email protected]> wrote
>Am I the only walker who overheats? Even the flimsiest of jackets causes me discomfort, be it in
>Scotland, the Alps or even the Lake District!!
>
No, my female companion runs hot when walking, at least on hills, even with the breavable stuff I
have bought her for various birthdays and Xmas's. :)

>A stroll with the dog around Loweswater today saw me down to a t-shirt.....I certainly don't
>consider myself "hard" but I really do not understand the perceived need for Arctic gear in
>temperatures well above zero!
>
Well we were walking today and the starting temperature was 2.5°, and I wore a thermal base layer,
Paramo shirt, cheap fleece and waterproof coat. I found it necessary to remove the waterproof coat
halfway around. I am 70, and for the last 5 years have found cold weather increasingly
uncomfortable. It's partly an ageing and circulation thing. I NEED winter gear. OTOH, I have walked
in only boots and rucksack for a few miles, in areas where we were not meeting people, but only in
temperatures above 75°F. On Spanish and Yugoslavian islands I dispensed with the boots and sack, but
it was too damned hot to wear anything anyway.

>Martell, the cave explorer, used to deliberately expose himself (!!!!) to extremes in order to
>toughen himself for difficult explorations. Are we losing this?? Are we becoming too "soft" ???
>
I used to read the Wizard comic when I was very young, and there was an athlete known only as Wilson
who lived a hermit life in a cave, wearing only a leotard which covered him from wrist to ankle,
even in the worst winters. He carried out some astounding feats of endurance running, but then, he
was only a figment of the author's (and our) imagination.

>Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk had
>more gear than George Fisher!

--
Gordon
 
F

Fran

Guest
[email protected] said...
> Apparently trainee monks have some competition to see how many tea towels they can dry out draped
> over their body whilst doing so...or something like that. Must learn how to do that, think how
> much weight you could save backpacking.
>
And just think of the savings we could all make, using our own naked bodies to dry the laundry
instead of the rumblegrinder! Is the snow obligatory though? There isn't always a ready supply
of it here.
--
Fran If you need my email address please ask.
 
F

Fran

Guest
[email protected] said...

> > >Keswick and Cockermouth today had distinct reminders of Kathmandu........most walkery-type folk
> > >had more gear than George Fisher!
> >
> > Must have been "serious walkers" :)
>
> What makes a serious walker then?

Someone without a sense of humour?
--
Fran If you need my email address please ask.