McCann's steel cut oats

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Feb 20, 2006.

  1. My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    the coupon. Directions are for stovetop prep but I don't get to a very
    low simmer on my stove and I'm used to cooking my oatmeal in the
    microwave.

    I soaked the oats in milk overnight in the fridge (I cook my oatmeal
    with milk rather than water) and nuked it at 100% power for about 3-4
    minutes (2 cups milk, 1 cup oats) in a tall 1-quart Pyrex measuring
    cup/pitcher, then for about 20 minutes at 40% power. I sprinkled Butter
    Buds on top, stirred in a small handful of dried cherries, and sprinkled
    some brown sugar on top.

    It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    time -- and soak in water instead of milk.

    Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. (With a nod and a tip
    of my hat to Moose.)
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 2-19-2006, Yummy! and church review. :)
     
    Tags:


  2. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon. Directions are for stovetop prep but I don't get to a very
    > low simmer on my stove and I'm used to cooking my oatmeal in the
    > microwave.
    >
    > I soaked the oats in milk overnight in the fridge (I cook my oatmeal
    > with milk rather than water) and nuked it at 100% power for about 3-4
    > minutes (2 cups milk, 1 cup oats) in a tall 1-quart Pyrex measuring
    > cup/pitcher, then for about 20 minutes at 40% power. I sprinkled Butter
    > Buds on top, stirred in a small handful of dried cherries, and sprinkled
    > some brown sugar on top.
    >
    > It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    > time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >

    But, I do mine on stovetop. Just had mine for the day a few minutes ago.
    Yum.
    McCann's for the tin most everywhere around here is $4.99. $7.99 must put
    them up there in price with the Alford's.
    Dee Dee
     
  3. Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon.



    Man, I thought oats was "poor food"...who knew?

    In any case I'm intrigued with making them (per your post and Sheldon's
    mention of getting a slow cooker to prepare oats)...I'll eventually I guess
    try them in my new crockpot.

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon.


    Yeah, McCann's is kinda 'spensive. But I found a source for steel cut
    oats where the prices are far more in line for the normal folks.

    http://www.store.honeyvillegrain.co...&txtSearch=steel+cut+oats&btnSearch=GO&Page=1

    Honeyville charges $4.50 shipping regardless how large the order, can't
    beat that.

    Yesterday I found a neighbor who is pleased to split a 50lb bag with
    me... I'll be placing my order in a few minutes.

    > Directions are for stovetop prep but I don't get to a very low simmer on my stove


    Yeah, you gotta keep stirring.

    > and I'm used to cooking my oatmeal in the microwave.


    The non stop stirring is why I decided to try the slow cooker route...
    it works very well. I made enough for five days worth. A portion
    reheats nicely in the microwave... I discovered that adding a generous
    splash of milk to the bowl makes the reheating process flawless, even
    renews the crust that formed around the crock... cover with plastic
    wrap of course. I like my steel cut oats with a good sprinkle of
    Penzeys Viet Cong cinnamon and a good squirt of honey

    Yesterday I tried the slow cooker on a pot roast... fergedaboudit!
    Sucks. Followed the recipe that came with the unit, except I added a
    small handful barley, thinking that would thicken things a bit. Turned
    out very bland, practically tasteless. Produced lots of thin watery
    *tasteless* juice, barley didn't help. Veggies had no texture, not
    unless yoose call mush texture. And since the recipe calls for placing
    sliced onions on the bottom, and since they don't get sauted even a
    little, the raw onion taste is much too strong... raw onion is all I
    smelled all day. And the poor roast was totally reduced to a mass of
    chewy strings. My cats liked the strings... and usually they won't
    eat my pot roast... probably because it's too highly seasoned for them
    (and I don't make strings, I hate falling apart stringy pot roast),
    this tasted like nothing, or maybe like freshly killed mouse, the
    stringy tails. This was not pot roast, it was boiled to death slop. I
    won't be using the slow cooker for anything other than oats. I really
    don't believe that there are too many slow cookers out there that get
    used more than a couple of times before being retired to the
    basement/attic... or tag sale. The slow cooker is definitely not a
    cooking method, other than for those with CTAD. My composter cooks
    better than a slow cooker.

    Sheldon
     
  5. On Mon 20 Feb 2006 06:03:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's
    Jammin'?

    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon. Directions are for stovetop prep but I don't get to a very
    > low simmer on my stove and I'm used to cooking my oatmeal in the
    > microwave.
    >
    > I soaked the oats in milk overnight in the fridge (I cook my oatmeal
    > with milk rather than water) and nuked it at 100% power for about 3-4
    > minutes (2 cups milk, 1 cup oats) in a tall 1-quart Pyrex measuring
    > cup/pitcher, then for about 20 minutes at 40% power. I sprinkled Butter
    > Buds on top, stirred in a small handful of dried cherries, and sprinkled
    > some brown sugar on top.
    >
    > It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    > time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >
    > Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. (With a nod and a tip
    > of my hat to Moose.)


    McCann's has always been my first choice over generic or other run of the
    mill steel-cut oats. The cut seems to be in somewhat larger particles,
    giving a better texture. The pricing in our area is similar to yours, so I
    don't usually buy them unless they're on sale or there's a coupon.

    If I think of it ahead of time, I soak the oats in hot water overnight.
    Soaked or not, I still think that steel-cut oats benefit greatly from
    longer, slower cooking. While I nuke a lot of foods, steel-cut oats is
    definitely not one of them. If they've been soaked overnight, it only
    takes 10-15 minutes to cook them properly on the stove-top. Unsoaked takes
    at least 30-40 minutes. Then there's also the slow-cooker method that does
    a proper job as well, and no waiting in the morning.

    The last time I made them, I tried Dee's vinegar trick and really liked the
    result.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  6. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon. Directions are for stovetop prep but I don't get to a very
    > low simmer on my stove and I'm used to cooking my oatmeal in the
    > microwave.
    >
    > I soaked the oats in milk overnight in the fridge (I cook my oatmeal
    > with milk rather than water) and nuked it at 100% power for about 3-4
    > minutes (2 cups milk, 1 cup oats) in a tall 1-quart Pyrex measuring
    > cup/pitcher, then for about 20 minutes at 40% power. I sprinkled Butter
    > Buds on top, stirred in a small handful of dried cherries, and sprinkled
    > some brown sugar on top.
    >
    > It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    > time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >
    > Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. (With a nod and a tip
    > of my hat to Moose.)



    Try a generous 1/2 cup of oats in 2 cups of water. At night, bring to a
    boil then cover and turn off the heat. Next morning, add a pinch of
    salt and cook like you would "quick" (not instant) rolled oats.

    Parboiling works much better than soaking in cold water; I don't know
    why. I buy steel cut oats at the local health food store; they're less
    than $1 per pound.

    Bob
     
  7. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > the coupon.


    I hope that the coupon was for a lot. Their regular price is a lot more that prices
    around here, and I am talking Canadian dollars.
     
  8. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > Try a generous 1/2 cup of oats in 2 cups of water. At night, bring to a
    > boil then cover and turn off the heat. Next morning, add a pinch of
    > salt and cook like you would "quick" (not instant) rolled oats.
    > Parboiling works much better than soaking in cold water; I don't know
    > why.


    I tried all the different soaking methods but I like the slow cooker
    method best... I followed teh recipes I found on teh net; 2 cups oats +
    8 cups water. I think 9-10 cups of water will work better as a
    substantial amount of liquid evaporates over the long cooking time.
    The slow cooker does produce a very much creamier product as opposed to
    the short cut methods. I also found cooking steel cut oats one serving
    at a time produces more clean up to deal with. I also found that the 2
    cups of oats only produced three portions for me, next time I will slow
    cook 3 cups of oats with 14 cups water. Took only five minutes in the
    microwave to heat a big bowlful steaming hot.

    > I buy steel cut oats at the local health food store; they're less than $1per pound.


    At the Honeyville.com web site I can buy steel cut oats for 85¢/lb
    including shipping... of course I need to buy 50 pounds to get that
    price, but they do sell smaller quantities in cans at substantial
    savings over MaCann's. I just called to place my order only to
    discover thay are closed, it's a holiday. I could order on line but I
    prefer calling in my orders to dot.coms whenever possible, this way I
    get to ask questions, and I want to ask about their buckwheat; what
    granulation they sell and if I can buy less than the 50 pounds they
    indicate at their web site. I was easily able to find people to share
    the 50 pound sack of oats but I don't think any will be interested in
    buckwheat/kasha. I would buy the 50 pound sizes myself but I don't
    want to buy more than I can use in a reasonable time, there is no
    savings if after six months it gets buggy. I also wanted to ask
    Honeyville about their "thick cut" oats, the description at their web
    site is not clear as to how they compare with their regualr steel cut
    oats, or perhaps they mean thicker rolled oats?

    Anyway, I really like these steel cut oats... don't think I could go
    back to regular oats... and makes for a much more healthful breakfast
    than what I would usually choose... also more stick to the ribs
    satisfying, don't really feel like eating much lunch. Yesterday all I
    wanted for lunch was a cheese sandwich and an apple... dinner was a
    bowl of those awful slow cooker pot roast strings. Blech!

    I don't have enough MaCann's left (not a whole lot in that 1 3/4lb can,
    and at $6-$7 is a rip off) so will have to wait for my 50 pound sack to
    arrive. I also want to try a batch toasted. And I like this oatmal
    with cinnamon and honey... even collected all my jars of honey that
    haven't been used in so long they were all crystalized, and warmed them
    all in a big pot of water to reliquify... now this stallion is all
    ready. Neigh, snort, snort!

    Sheldon
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dave Smith wrote:
    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    > > been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    > > the coupon.

    >
    > I hope that the coupon was for a lot. Their regular price is a lot more that prices
    > around here, and I am talking Canadian dollars.


    Oats I'd think should be inexpensive in Canada, I believe they lead the
    world in production. I think when you buy MaCann's most of the cost is
    for import tarrifs and metal tins. The Honeyville product I mentioned
    is from Canada.. I don't anticipate it will be at all inferior to
    MaCann's, might even be better. In fact you can purchase the
    Honeyville product from Amazon.com, but it costs like $10 more from
    them... Amazon charges less for the oats but charges like $25 for
    shipping that 50lb sack, so it comes out costing like $15 more. But at
    the Amazon site there are some reviews from satisfied customers.

    Amazon sells the Honeyvill oats in cans also, those are much less
    expensive direct from Honeyville too.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref...1566?search-alias=aps&keywords=steel cut oats

    Sheldon
     
  10. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    > > I hope that the coupon was for a lot. Their regular price is a lot more that prices
    > > around here, and I am talking Canadian dollars.

    >
    > Oats I'd think should be inexpensive in Canada, I believe they lead the
    > world in production. I think when you buy MaCann's most of the cost is
    > for import tarrifs and metal tins.


    FWIW I usually buy large flake rolled oats in a 1 kg (2.2 lb) bag for $2.45. McCanns steel cut is $6 or 7. and
    that is for 18 oz. The steel cut oats are good, but it is a PITA to have to cook so much longer than large
    flake, and they don't nuke as well so it's not worth making a big bunch in advance. I prefer the large flake over
    the quicker cooking types. So I usually just have large flake and make one serving at a time. MaCanns is not
    widely available, and even where it is sold there is just a small amount of shelf space for it, and it is right
    next to the shelves that have instant, minute, quick cooking and large flake varieties from at least three other
    brands.

    Given the current exchange rate, Melba' supplier's steel cut oats are $8.68 Cdn. , a hell of a lot more than we
    pay.


    > The Honeyville product I mentioned
    > is from Canada.. I don't anticipate it will be at all inferior to
    > MaCann's, might even be better. In fact you can purchase the
    > Honeyville product from Amazon.com, but it costs like $10 more from
    > them... Amazon charges less for the oats but charges like $25 for
    > shipping that 50lb sack, so it comes out costing like $15 more. But at
    > the Amazon site there are some reviews from satisfied customers.


    Not worth it more me to buy in such quantity. Oats degrade once they are processed. They taste much better when
    freshly milled. There is no way I can tell how long they sat in a warehouse or store shelf before I buy them, but
    once opened they should be used up as quickly as possible.
     
  11. Ken

    Ken Guest

    >
    > It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    > time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >


    Melba,

    I do something close to another poster: At dinner time, I put 1:4
    steel cut oats to milk (Actually three milk and one water to prevent
    burning.) in a heavy pot, bring to a boil, turn off the heat and let
    sit covered. When it's time for bed, it's cooled. I put it in a
    storage container and refrigerate. In the morning, I nuke it, add some
    brown sugar, some cinnamon, and fresh fruit, and it's a quick breakfast
    before work. I usually make a big batch and it's breakfast for several
    days.

    I buy steel cut through my co-op, and it's about sixty cents American
    per pound for organic. Only organic is offered, so I don't know the
    price for non-organic. I can't believe it when I pay .60 and the
    stores charge $2.00 for oats in a nice cardboard container.

    So, what is Dee's vinegar trick? Or do I have to ping Dee?

    Thanks,

    Ken
     
  12. jay

    jay Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 06:09:37 -0800, Sheldon wrote:


    > Yesterday I tried the slow cooker on a pot roast... fergedaboudit!
    > Sucks. Followed the recipe


    > My composter cooks
    > better than a slow cooker.
    >
    > Sheldon


    Thanks for the information on the slow beef. I was tempted to do the Beef
    Bourgiunon (bourguignonne/bourguignon) that was posted yesterday. It
    sounded pretty good. I have never had much luck with the crock pot.
    Everything I have tried to cook in it turned out..well I guess I should
    say didn't turn out all that good. Most of the ingredients were not
    even recognizable after 8 hours of melt down. I did get a batch of dry
    pintos out of it once that were decent and the beans still looked sorta
    like beans. Will try it for oats. BTW.. how did the liner work out..I
    mean were you able to get that thing on all by yourself or did you have to
    have some help? ;)
     
  13. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >
    >> It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    >> time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >>

    >
    > Melba,
    >
    > I do something close to another poster: At dinner time, I put 1:4
    > steel cut oats to milk (Actually three milk and one water to prevent
    > burning.) in a heavy pot, bring to a boil, turn off the heat and let
    > sit covered. When it's time for bed, it's cooled. I put it in a
    > storage container and refrigerate. In the morning, I nuke it, add some
    > brown sugar, some cinnamon, and fresh fruit, and it's a quick breakfast
    > before work. I usually make a big batch and it's breakfast for several
    > days.
    >
    > I buy steel cut through my co-op, and it's about sixty cents American
    > per pound for organic. Only organic is offered, so I don't know the
    > price for non-organic. I can't believe it when I pay .60 and the
    > stores charge $2.00 for oats in a nice cardboard container.
    >
    > So, what is Dee's vinegar trick? Or do I have to ping Dee?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Ken


    Here's my post:
    We use a little vinegar (1-3 tsp perhaps) in the warm soaking water that we
    soak the oats in overnight. Done this way, I've read makes them quicker to
    break down and easier to digest. They never taste vinegar-y, but whether
    it's my imagination or not, I think they actually taste better.
    Dee Dee

    I pay $1.99 for an 18 oz. cardboard container of organic steel-cut oats at
    Trader-Joe's. I've also bought the brand Arrowhead Mills, a reputable mill
    that I prize their products, but steel-cut oats are not orderable from them
    http://www.arrowheadmills.com/products/product.php?prod_id=227&cat_id=57
    I can't remember their cost.

    A rfc poster did give a link to a grainery that gave low shipping rates,
    but I found no 'organic' steel cut oats at their location. Most grains'
    shipping rates make them prohibitive for me to buy that way. Yes, you are
    lucky to get your oats for $.60. Eat plenty!

    Dee Dee
     
  14. Ken

    Ken Guest


    > > So, what is Dee's vinegar trick? Or do I have to ping Dee?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Ken

    >
    > Here's my post:
    > We use a little vinegar (1-3 tsp perhaps) in the warm soaking water that we
    > soak the oats in overnight. Done this way, I've read makes them quicker to
    > break down and easier to digest. They never taste vinegar-y, but whether
    > it's my imagination or not, I think they actually taste better.
    > Dee Dee
    >
    > I pay $1.99 for an 18 oz. cardboard container of organic steel-cut oats at
    > Trader-Joe's. I've also bought the brand Arrowhead Mills, a reputable mill
    > that I prize their products, but steel-cut oats are not orderable from them
    > http://www.arrowheadmills.com/products/product.php?prod_id=227&cat_id=57
    > I can't remember their cost.
    >
    > A rfc poster did give a link to a grainery that gave low shipping rates,
    > but I found no 'organic' steel cut oats at their location. Most grains'
    > shipping rates make them prohibitive for me to buy that way. Yes, you are
    > lucky to get your oats for $.60. Eat plenty!
    >
    > Dee Dee


    Dee Dee,

    Thanks for the info.

    Arrowhead Mills is good as is Bob's Red Mill. But both are much
    pricier than the 25 or 50 pound bags we get at the co-op and divide up
    ourselves. I'm in Central California if anybod wants some at sixty
    cents. I'll glady get it for you. Sorry, my delivery is only a fifty
    mile radius.

    Thanks again,

    Ken
     
  15. On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 08:48:25 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> My food co-op had a coupon special for the tin of McCann's oats and I've
    >> been curious about them, so I bought. <cough> $7.55 for the tin, less
    >> the coupon.
    >> It was okay; I think I'll try Dee Randall's vinegar trick with it next
    >> time -- and soak in water instead of milk.
    >>

    >But, I do mine on stovetop. Just had mine for the day a few minutes ago.
    >Yum.
    >McCann's for the tin most everywhere around here is $4.99. $7.99 must put
    >them up there in price with the Alford's.
    >Dee Dee
    >


    When you get your Trader Joes up there, they sell them as well. And
    they have a cheaper brand, which is still steel cut oats.

    I tend to cook mine overnight in the crockpot. I cut back the water
    on them since there is less evaporation. I usually use 3:1, instead
    of the usual 4 cups water. Works great.

    Christine
     
  16. MissMoon

    MissMoon Guest

    I buy my whole oats at my local health food store. In Vista we have a
    Sprouts and I think last time i paid 78 cents a pound.

    I wish my web site had this much activity in the forums...sigh. Almost
    all the posts are from Guido and myself. But I still love it.
    [email protected]
     
  17. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    MissMoon wrote:
    > I buy my whole oats at my local health food store. In Vista we have a
    > Sprouts and I think last time i paid 78 cents a pound.
    >
    > I wish my web site had this much activity in the forums...sigh. Almost
    > all the posts are from Guido and myself.


    Unless you're in the C-Menta Shooz business the name "Guido" definitely
    ain't a draw... "Miss Moon" ain't any great booty shaker either.
     
  18. Sheldon wrote:

    > the poor roast was totally reduced to a mass of chewy strings. My cats
    > liked the strings... and usually they won't eat my pot roast... probably
    > because it's too highly seasoned for them (and I don't make strings, I
    > hate falling apart stringy pot roast),


    If you haven't already thrown it out, you might be able to make some decent
    enchiladas from the leftovers.

    Bob
     
  19. Sheldon wrote:

    > MissMoon wrote:
    > > I buy my whole oats at my local health food store. In Vista we have a
    > > Sprouts and I think last time i paid 78 cents a pound.
    > >
    > > I wish my web site had this much activity in the forums...sigh. Almost
    > > all the posts are from Guido and myself.

    >
    > Unless you're in the C-Menta Shooz business the name "Guido" definitely
    > ain't a draw... "Miss Moon" ain't any great booty shaker either.



    Lol...and if they have a kid they could give it the moniker "Guinea
    Moon"...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks for the information on the slow beef. I was tempted to do the Beef
    > Bourgiunon (bourguignonne/bourguignon) that was posted yesterday. It
    > sounded pretty good. I have never had much luck with the crock pot.
    > Everything I have tried to cook in it turned out..well I guess I should
    > say didn't turn out all that good. Most of the ingredients were not
    > even recognizable after 8 hours of melt down. I did get a batch of dry
    > pintos out of it once that were decent and the beans still looked sorta
    > like beans. Will try it for oats. BTW.. how did the liner work out..I
    > mean were you able to get that thing on all by yourself or did you have to
    > have some help? ;)


    I generally don't like meat cooked to death in a crock pot, but I
    have a pot roast recipe I make in it that is wonderful. It is much
    better to do the same kind of prep as you would on a stove, such as
    browning the meat.

    Slow Cooked Pot Roast with Mustard & Horseradish Gravy from Fine Cooking

    2 carrots, peeled and cut in half width wise (I used 4 and quartered
    them)
    1 medium yellow onion, peeled and sliced into 4 wedges
    3 cloves garlic, smashed (I use 4)
    3 sprigs fresh thyme
    1 large bay leaf
    3 whole cloves or allspice berries (we used cloves)
    1 cup homemade or low-salt canned chicken broth
    1 cup dry white wine (they recommended Sauvignon Blanc, I used Pinot
    Grigio)
    2 tablespoons tomato paste
    1 boneless beef chuck roast (2 1/2-3 lbs)
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    2 tablespoons brandy
    1/2 teaspoon prepared horseradish (I used about 4 times this amount)
    1/2 teaspoon grainy prepared mustard (again, 4 times this)
    2 tablespoons sour cream
    1 teaspoon all purpose flour
    2 tablespoons finely minced flat leaf parsley

    Put carrots, onion, garlic, thyme, bay leaf and cloves or allspice in
    the bottom of a slow cooker. In measuring cup or bowl, whisk together
    the broth, wine and tomato paste to blend.

    Set large heavy based skillet over medium high heat. Pat roast dry,
    rub with olive oil, salt and pepper all over. Sear roast in skillet
    until a dark crust forms on one side, 3-5 minutes, turn and sear other
    side. Reduce heat to medium and put roast on top of vegetables in the
    crock. Add broth mixture to skillet, bring to boil and scrape the
    bottom to loosen any browned bits. Pour the liquid over the roast and
    cover the crock, don't stir. Turn the slow cooker to low, cook gently
    without lifting the lid until the roast is fall apart tender, 8-10 hours
    (I did this for 8 hours).

    Transfer roast to a cutting board and tent with foil. Strain
    contents of crock through a sieve set over a medium sauce pan (I used
    the same skillet from before). Discard the solids (I disagree with this
    and saved the carrots, onion and garlic to serve with the meat). Skim
    fat from the top of the strained liquid. Bring to boil and simmer
    rapidly until reduced by half, about 10 minutes. Whisk in the brandy,
    horseradish and mustard. In a small bowl, mix the flour into the sour
    cream, stir in a few tablespoons of the sauce, then pour the sour cream
    mixture into the sauce, whisking vigorously to blend. Cook over medium
    heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes to blend the flavors.
    Meanwhile, slice the roast thinly. Serve with the gravy and a
    sprinkling of parsley.

    I like to serve this with either mashed potatoes or egg noodles and a
    salad along with the veggies from the pot.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
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