MTB Handlebar Height

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Michael J. Klein, Jun 19, 2004.

  1. I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    on the handlebar? New stem time?
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
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    Tags:


  2. Bert L.am

    Bert L.am Guest

    "Michael J. Klein" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    > feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    > palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    > bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    > on the handlebar? New stem time?


    No, two days on a new bike is not enough for a real answer to your question.
    Try at least two weeks or better two months.
    One has to get adjusted to ones new bike and in the process of adjustment
    (or getting used to) pain is sometimes the name of the game
    What type of gloves are you using?


    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  3. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 18:28:02 +0800, Michael J. Klein
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >on the handlebar? New stem time?
    >Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    >Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    >Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings


    How are the brake handles and shifters set up? If they are rotated so
    that they are facing forward, you have to twist your wrist back and
    down for operation, and this can cause problems. Pretend the levers
    aren't there and see where your hands, arms, and shoulders are
    comfortable. Then rotate the levers to match this. Not the other way
    around, rotating wrists to match levers.

    Still it sounds like the stem could be changed for now. When I bought
    a similar bike last year, the handlebars were at the right distance
    but far too low. I was getting a cramp/pain at the base of my neck
    from having to hold my head back in order to see. Getting a stem that
    raised it an inch solved that.

    Since you just got back on a bike (if I remember your other posts) I'd
    play it conservative. Get a new stem that pulls the handlebars back
    and up. Maybe the dealer could loan you an adjustable one for a week
    or two, and when you find the right position you buy a new one from
    him? As time goes on and your body adjusts, you can swap stems again,
    maybe ending up with the one you have right now after a year...

    Look at the seat position, also. This seriously affects how weight is
    distributed between the seat and handlebars.

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm
     
  4. RE/
    >I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >on the handlebar? New stem time?


    Not normal.

    First think I'd check is the saddle tilt. Maybe you're sliding forward on a
    saddle whose nose is down rather than level or up.

    Does the bike have riser bars? If not, one option for more height is risers.

    Another option is one of those extenders that goes between the steering tube and
    your stem. Dunno how robust they are mechanically, but they're good for 3-4"
    of height.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 17:15:14 +0200, "Bert L.am" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Michael J. Klein" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    >news:eek:[email protected]
    >> I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >> feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >> palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >> bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >> on the handlebar? New stem time?

    >
    >No, two days on a new bike is not enough for a real answer to your question.
    >Try at least two weeks or better two months.
    >One has to get adjusted to ones new bike and in the process of adjustment
    >(or getting used to) pain is sometimes the name of the game
    >What type of gloves are you using?


    gloves?
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
    [email protected]
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    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    www.goto-info.com
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
     
  6. On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 08:36:35 -0700, Dan Daniel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 18:28:02 +0800, Michael J. Klein
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >>feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >>palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >>bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >>on the handlebar? New stem time?
    >>Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    >>Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    >>Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings

    >
    >How are the brake handles and shifters set up? If they are rotated so
    >that they are facing forward, you have to twist your wrist back and
    >down for operation, and this can cause problems. Pretend the levers
    >aren't there and see where your hands, arms, and shoulders are
    >comfortable. Then rotate the levers to match this. Not the other way
    >around, rotating wrists to match levers.


    The position of the brakes and shifters appears good. I will keep
    taht aspect in mind though, as small changes can make a big
    difference.

    >Still it sounds like the stem could be changed for now. When I bought
    >a similar bike last year, the handlebars were at the right distance
    >but far too low. I was getting a cramp/pain at the base of my neck
    >from having to hold my head back in order to see. Getting a stem that
    >raised it an inch solved that.
    >
    >Since you just got back on a bike (if I remember your other posts) I'd
    >play it conservative. Get a new stem that pulls the handlebars back
    >and up. Maybe the dealer could loan you an adjustable one for a week
    >or two, and when you find the right position you buy a new one from
    >him? As time goes on and your body adjusts, you can swap stems again,
    >maybe ending up with the one you have right now after a year...


    I'm going to ask him about that later next week when I go back for
    some adjustments.

    >Look at the seat position, also. This seriously affects how weight is
    >distributed between the seat and handlebars.


    That is a very good point! I was thinking about that but I didn't
    adjust anything yet for lack of information. Thanks for the URL.

    >http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm



    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
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    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    www.goto-info.com
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
     
  7. On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 19:16:37 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RE/
    >>I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >>feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >>palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >>bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >>on the handlebar? New stem time?

    >
    >Not normal.


    Thanks for confirming that. Its my belief that if something feels
    wrong, it probably is.

    >First think I'd check is the saddle tilt. Maybe you're sliding forward on a
    >saddle whose nose is down rather than level or up.


    I did make some saddle adjustments today, after reading about bicycle
    fitting. This seems to have made quite a positive difference.

    >Does the bike have riser bars? If not, one option for more height is risers.


    I don't know what riser bars are! I have a pretty basic Giant Yukon
    MTB.

    >Another option is one of those extenders that goes between the steering tube and
    >your stem. Dunno how robust they are mechanically, but they're good for 3-4"
    >of height.


    That sounds interesting. I just came back from a pretty long ride
    (for me that is, considering I got it 4 days ago) and I don't seem to
    have the hand/arm fatigue that I did previously.

    I'm going to detail the adjustments I made in another message so you
    may choose the level of boredom you wish to be exposed to! lol

    Thanks Pete!

    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  8. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Michael J. Klein wrote:
    > On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 19:16:37 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Does the bike have riser bars? If not, one option for more height
    >> is risers.

    >
    > I don't know what riser bars are! I have a pretty basic Giant Yukon
    > MTB.


    A riser bar has upward curves, as opposed to a "flat bar" that's...well, you
    know :)

    > Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    > Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    > Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    > ---------------------------------------------


    Thanks for losing the long string of addies here!

    Bill "noticed" S.
     
  9. Note: This is the second reply to the original reply:

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 08:36:35 -0700, Dan Daniel
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 18:28:02 +0800, Michael J. Klein
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >

    <my comments snipped>

    >How are the brake handles and shifters set up? If they are rotated so
    >that they are facing forward, you have to twist your wrist back and
    >down for operation, and this can cause problems. Pretend the levers
    >aren't there and see where your hands, arms, and shoulders are
    >comfortable. Then rotate the levers to match this. Not the other way
    >around, rotating wrists to match levers.


    I took another look at how they were positioned. I'm a manufacturing
    engineer by trade and have setup quite a number of factory assembly
    lines and ergonomic workstations. I did end up adjusting the
    brake/shifter positions slightly different from where they were
    originally. The compromise is for the thumb. When the brakes are
    dead centered for pull, the thumbs have to be moved way up.
    Positioning the brake levers up somewhat puts the thumb shifting lever
    down and then its not such a wrist move to reach them.

    <other stuff snipped out>

    >Look at the seat position, also. This seriously affects how weight is
    >distributed between the seat and handlebars.
    >
    >http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm


    After reading this article again (I had read it some time ago, but now
    I had something to actually adjust), I made some minor adjustments one
    at a time. I went for a ride and checked out the adjustments. For
    me, this was a pretty long ride.

    Before I left, I put the seat back about 2.5 cm (~1"). I rode it to
    the bottom of the big hill and around some before I stopped to take a
    drink. At that point I pushed it back further, about another cm.
    After I went back up to the top of the hill, I adusted the seat
    incline nose up and rode it home. I like the final adjustment and my
    arms feel a lot better now. Typically I felt like I had been bench
    pressing the whole time. Now I feel more balanced. I anticipate that
    as I lose this gut I'll have to push the seat forward as I'll have
    less "ballast" to offset. lol

    I know you guys like to get technical, so I made a map of the course I
    rode today, which you can see here:
    http://www.asiancastings.com/images/ride.jpg The overall distance
    indicated by the green line is approximately 2.47 KM one-way. Just on
    the other side of the highway, (the blue line) is where I actually
    went. The blue line is an irrigation channel which feeds the rice
    paddies, and has a narrow paved path next to it. I rode south on the
    narrow path until I couldn't go any further due to obstacles (fallen
    debris). I turned around and rode north for several kilometers along
    the irrigation channel and then back under the highway through some
    small neighborhoods and temples. You have to see it to appreciate how
    cool it is to ride through the Taiwan countryside. Next time I go out
    I will get some pictures - but imagine Buddhist temples next to rice
    paddies with a thin paved bike path, and the Central Mountain Range in
    the background and you pretty much have it.

    The part of the road with the large "S" curve (on the website image)
    is an impressive hill with goes down as it approaches the highway. My
    GPS indicates that the point where the curve begins to the point where
    the road crosses the highway is 400 meters, straight line. Yet,
    within this linear distance the change in elevation is well over 100
    meters! Needless to say, I rode the brakes pretty much all the way
    down. While I was concerned about being able to get back uphill, I
    was determined to not let the size of the hill and the grade
    intimidate me and stop me from enjoying my ride on the flatlands
    beyond. I could hear the motor strain on the scooters passing me
    going uphill, lol.

    On the uphill climb, I put it in granny and spun my way up. I stopped
    3 times to rest. Each time I got back on I felt stronger. I had
    people driving by in cars and on scooters who had incredulous looks on
    their faces. One guy looked at me and gave me a very hearty "thumbs
    up." Once I got to the top I took a rest on the steps of a temple
    (this is where I made the seat angle adjustment). The guy in the van
    had returned and drove by me again, with another thumbs up. Just
    after that, a 20-something (or less) young man went down the hill. He
    came back a few mins later, walking his bike! lol He didn't go more
    than 50 meters and decided it was too much for him. At 48 y/o, that
    made me feel pretty good. About that time I felt like starting back
    home and I ended up passing that guy without actually intending to.
    This leads me to think that I'm not quite as out of shape as I
    thought.

    Number of meters walking the bike back uphill: 0
    Number of meters riding off-seat back uphill: 0
    Total distance ridden, including large hill: 7km (estimate)

    I understand that for you bike jocks this is nothing. For me, its a
    beginning. I feel really great and I believe that is the Zen goal
    (remember, the meaning of the word "zen" is truth). I will get some
    pictures of the area next time because of its scenic beauty.

    For those of you who care (and don't know), I have written 2 bike
    articles related to manufacturing. See
    http://www.asiancastings.com/photo_galleries.htm for the master list
    of articles. At some point I will do one regarding my fledgling bike
    activites. lol
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  10. On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 04:09:29 GMT, "S o r n i"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael J. Klein wrote:
    >> On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 19:16:37 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>> Does the bike have riser bars? If not, one option for more height
    >>> is risers.

    >>
    >> I don't know what riser bars are! I have a pretty basic Giant Yukon
    >> MTB.

    >
    >A riser bar has upward curves, as opposed to a "flat bar" that's...well, you
    >know :)


    Duh, thanks! lol Mine is a slight riser then. Its rotated for the
    max offset. I was thinking that I'd like to find a set of high
    handlebars like I had when I was a kid, lol.

    >Thanks for losing the long string of addies here!


    The addresses had done their work. I thank everyone for their
    understanding. In fact, if everyone posted the personal email
    addresses of spammers on USENET, maybe they would get the message that
    spam is not a good thing. Maybe....
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  11. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> writes:

    > Number of meters walking the bike back uphill: 0
    > Number of meters riding off-seat back uphill: 0
    > Total distance ridden, including large hill: 7km (estimate)


    Killing a challenging hill: priceless.

    Keep going; you're doing very well.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  12. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Michael J. Klein wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 04:09:29 GMT, "S o r n i" wrote:
    >>
    >> Thanks for losing the long string of addies here!

    >
    > The addresses had done their work. I thank everyone for their
    > understanding. In fact, if everyone posted the personal email
    > addresses of spammers on USENET, maybe they would get the message that
    > spam is not a good thing. Maybe....


    Ah. I missed the explanation of why they were there.

    Bill "hmmmmm... pretty clever" S.
     
  13. On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 21:39:56 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> Number of meters walking the bike back uphill: 0
    >> Number of meters riding off-seat back uphill: 0
    >> Total distance ridden, including large hill: 7km (estimate)

    >
    >Killing a challenging hill: priceless.
    >
    >Keep going; you're doing very well.
    >
    >
    >cheers,
    > Tom


    Thanks Tom - I'm having a blast. I appreciate the encouragement.

    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  14. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    > feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    > palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    > bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    > on the handlebar? New stem time?
    > Michael J. Klein [email protected]


    I think that although the other adjustments you've made will probably
    help, it's pretty likely that eventually a different stem will be the
    answer. It's at least part of the answer for everyone who cares to get
    a really good fit on their bike. It's true that a rider does get
    adjusted to a bike to some extent after a period of time, but I think
    this adjustment is pretty subtle and doesn't really have the ability
    to overcome notable problems in weight distribution, reach, etc. Or if
    it does, it certainly can't be relied upon to do so. Experimenting
    with an adjustable stem but not keeping it is a pretty good idea, but
    remember an adjustable (or the common ones, at least) doesn't really
    have the ability to simulate everything that the range of regular
    stems can give you. Also a good piece of advice I've become convinced
    about it is to pretty much completely ignore everything you hear about
    how some stems will "mess up the bike's steering geometry too much."
    It really isn't an issue. Stems with short extensions do change the
    way the bike steers, sometimes by quite a bit for really short
    extensions, but this is a change that you get used to pretty quick.
    So just get what feels good.
     
  15. Bert L.am

    Bert L.am Guest

    "Michael J. Klein" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 17:15:14 +0200, "Bert L.am" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Michael J. Klein" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    > >news:eek:[email protected]
    > >> I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    > >> feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    > >> palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    > >> bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    > >> on the handlebar? New stem time?

    > >
    > >No, two days on a new bike is not enough for a real answer to your

    question.
    > >Try at least two weeks or better two months.
    > >One has to get adjusted to ones new bike and in the process of adjustment
    > >(or getting used to) pain is sometimes the name of the game
    > >What type of gloves are you using?

    >
    > gloves?


    Cycling gloves with gel pads help to ease the pain from pressure.

    Back to the original issue:
    If you still have your old bike: copy paste all positions, heights and
    distances from handlebars, breaks, levers, saddle from the old to the new
    bike.

    bert l. (NL)


    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  16. Ned Mantei

    Ned Mantei Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >on the handlebar? New stem time?


    Assuming that the fit is at least approximately right, you might want to
    consider bar-ends as an alternative to a stem with more rise. I have
    mine pointing up at a ca. 45 degree angle from the horizontal. This
    allows for either a more upright or a more bent forward position,
    depending on headwinds, terrain, how I feel, etc. A bit like the
    multiple positions available with drop bars on road bikes. Bar-ends that
    curve around towards the middle offer even more hand positions.

    I have also been surprised at how much difference a couple of degrees of
    saddle angle can make.

    --
    Ned Mantei
    Department of Cell Biology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
    CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
     
  17. On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 10:35:34 +0200, "Bert L.am" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Michael J. Klein" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 17:15:14 +0200, "Bert L.am" <[email protected]> wrote:

    <snipped>

    >> >No, two days on a new bike is not enough for a real answer to your

    >question.
    >> >Try at least two weeks or better two months.
    >> >One has to get adjusted to ones new bike and in the process of adjustment
    >> >(or getting used to) pain is sometimes the name of the game
    >> >What type of gloves are you using?

    >>
    >> gloves?

    >
    >Cycling gloves with gel pads help to ease the pain from pressure.


    My contention is that in this case, the pressure was more than
    necessary. That seems to have proven true.

    >Back to the original issue:
    >If you still have your old bike: copy paste all positions, heights and
    >distances from handlebars, breaks, levers, saddle from the old to the new
    >bike.


    I never had a MTB bike before, and my old 10 speed was in 1976.

    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  18. On 20 Jun 2004 01:09:05 -0700, [email protected] (Nate Knutson)
    wrote:

    >Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >> feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >> palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >> bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >> on the handlebar? New stem time?
    >> Michael J. Klein [email protected]

    >
    >I think that although the other adjustments you've made will probably
    >help, it's pretty likely that eventually a different stem will be the
    >answer. It's at least part of the answer for everyone who cares to get
    >a really good fit on their bike. It's true that a rider does get
    >adjusted to a bike to some extent after a period of time, but I think
    >this adjustment is pretty subtle and doesn't really have the ability
    >to overcome notable problems in weight distribution, reach, etc. Or if
    >it does, it certainly can't be relied upon to do so. Experimenting
    >with an adjustable stem but not keeping it is a pretty good idea, but
    >remember an adjustable (or the common ones, at least) doesn't really
    >have the ability to simulate everything that the range of regular
    >stems can give you. Also a good piece of advice I've become convinced
    >about it is to pretty much completely ignore everything you hear about
    >how some stems will "mess up the bike's steering geometry too much."
    >It really isn't an issue. Stems with short extensions do change the
    >way the bike steers, sometimes by quite a bit for really short
    >extensions, but this is a change that you get used to pretty quick.
    >So just get what feels good.


    Thanks for the advise Nate. Sounds like good common sense thinking to
    me. I'll be going back to my dealer sometime next week and have a
    chat with him. I just hope my Chinese is up to it. lol
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  19. On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 14:12:18 +0200, Ned Mantei
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Michael J. Klein <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >>feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >>palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >>bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >>on the handlebar? New stem time?

    >
    >Assuming that the fit is at least approximately right, you might want to
    >consider bar-ends as an alternative to a stem with more rise. I have
    >mine pointing up at a ca. 45 degree angle from the horizontal. This
    >allows for either a more upright or a more bent forward position,
    >depending on headwinds, terrain, how I feel, etc. A bit like the
    >multiple positions available with drop bars on road bikes. Bar-ends that
    >curve around towards the middle offer even more hand positions.
    >
    >I have also been surprised at how much difference a couple of degrees of
    >saddle angle can make.


    I found out about the saddle angle today, and you are right about
    that. The bar ends are an interesting idea - I will see what my
    dealer has in stock. Thanks for the advice.

    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  20. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jun 2004 18:28:02 +0800, Michael J. Klein
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a new Giant Yukon. I've been riding it for 2 days and it
    >feels like I'm leaning way too much on the handlbars. My wrists and
    >palms do not like it at all. It looks like all the spacers are on the
    >bottom and the stem is up all the way. Is it normal to lean so hard
    >on the handlebar? New stem time?


    You have just discovered the reason why I prefer threaded steerers; in
    a threadless system, you have to buy a different stem to raise your
    bars just to see if that's what you really need, but a threaded
    steerer's quill stem makes it a trivial adjustment instead, within the
    limits of the quill's range.

    That minor and completely unhelpful rant aside, I think that you might
    want to look at one of the adjustable-angle threadless stems as a
    replacement. With an adjustable stem in place, if it turns out that
    your needs change as you become a more seasoned rider, you might not
    have to buy *yet another* stem to potentially account for that.
     
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