My MTB Is Too Slow



J

John Retchford

Guest
Drs wrote:
> First, how about you getting the attributions correct. I never made any
> such claim, I was quoting someone else's response to what I wrote and
> you've removed the context I provided. He's the ****** in need of a
> reality check, not me, and as far as I know he's not even reading this
> group. And there's no need for you to edit "****ty".



1. If you did not write the quoted material, I apologise. My new
reader attributes it to you. Perhaps your quoting of others was to
subtle for me

2. I did not edit your good Saxon word. That was done by Cycling Forums
through which I posted. When I look at your post with Google Group
your word is intact, but not when I look with Cycling Forums, wh
must feel that such basic functions are not fit for my eyes and m
unedited reply not fit for yours. You will probably find it altere
again in this reply

I gather now that we were both mocking the same original exaggerator

Cheers

John Retchfor


-
 
A

amirm

Guest
John Retchford wrote:
> This sort of thread usually produces the "there I was cruising past
> Lance Armstrong, Stuart O'Grady et al" response. The winner of the Tour
> de France usually averages about 41 km/h and these people are
> physiological freaks. Just what is this "cruising"?
> John Retchford


Actually when I was cruising on my MTB (with knobies) the other day, I
passed Stuart. When I asked where Lance was, he didn't answer.
Apparently I was too kool. ;)

Yeah, cruise is one term that needs to be defined first. When I use this
term myself, I mean a sustainable speed (within minor variation limits)
over a certain part of a route. This speed could be equal, faster or
slower than the trip's average speed.




--
 
D

DRS

Guest
John Retchford <[email protected]> wrote in message
[email protected]

[...]

> 1. If you did not write the quoted material, I apologise. My news
> reader attributes it to you. Perhaps your quoting of others was too
> subtle for me!


I don't understand the difficulty with "my comments first, then his
response".

> 2. I did not edit your good Saxon word. That was done by Cycling
> Forums, through which I posted. When I look at your post with
> Google Groups your word is intact, but not when I look with
> Cycling Forums, who must feel that such basic functions are not
> fit for my eyes and my unedited reply not fit for yours. You will
> probably find it altered again in this reply.


Creative use of hypostrophes usually gets around such things. Try ****-ty.

--

"The central problem with the concept of the 'Axis of Evil' is that it
involves an assumption that the US is the 'fulcrum of virtue'."
Bob Hawke
 
D

DRS

Guest
stu <[email protected]> wrote in message
[email protected]
> ohhhhhhhhhh I see now. Some more >>>>> would have made it clear what
> you were saying and what you were quoting.


I don't understand the difficulty with "my comments first, then his
response". There were only two paragraphs.

--

"The central problem with the concept of the 'Axis of Evil' is that it
involves an assumption that the US is the 'fulcrum of virtue'."
Bob Hawke
 
D

DRS

Guest
jamesc <[email protected]> wrote in message
[email protected]

[...]

> Changing tyres does have an impact as I when from 700 x 40 to 700 x
> 28.


Which tyres?

> Changing gearing also helped as I went from 42/32/22 to 44/32/22


How much did that cost?

--

"The central problem with the concept of the 'Axis of Evil' is that it
involves an assumption that the US is the 'fulcrum of virtue'."
Bob Hawke
 
J

jamesc

Guest
Drs wrote:
> jamesc <[email protected]> wrote in message
> [email protected]
> [...]
> > Changing tyres does have an impact as I when from 700 x 40 to 700 x
> > 28.

> Which tyres?
> > Changing gearing also helped as I went from 42/32/22 to 44/32/22

> How much did that cost?
> --
> "The central problem with the concept of the 'Axis of Evil' is
> that it involves an assumption that the US is the 'fulcrum of
> virtue'." Bob Hawke



In answer to your questions

Tyres - Continental Top Touring 2000 700 x 28 A$36 eac

Crank - Deore LX at about A$80 bought from the Internet over a year ago
as I have damaged my current chainrings I am now getting a trekkin
version (usually only available in Europe) of the Deore LX 48/36/26 fro
Cambriabik

Regard

Jame


-
 
K

kingsley

Guest
On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 22:50:18 +0000, amirm wrote:

> Yeah, cruise is one term that needs to be defined first. When I use this
> term myself, I mean a sustainable speed (within minor variation limits)
> over a certain part of a route. This speed could be equal, faster or
> slower than the trip's average speed.


Me too: to be 'crusing', the path must be mostly flat, since
otherwise you'd be climbing or descending. FWIW I'd define it
as riding along reasonably flat ground, at a speed where you're
not really exerting yourself, but not going slow either.

An easy pace.

-kt
 
D

DRS

Guest
jamesc <[email protected]> wrote in message
r6b%[email protected]

[...]

> In answer to your questions:
>
> Tyres - Continental Top Touring 2000 700 x 28 A$36 each


Which do you think made the greatest single difference, new tyres or a new
crank?

> Crank - Deore LX at about A$80 bought from the Internet over a year
> ago, as I have damaged my current chainrings I am now getting a
> trekking version (usually only available in Europe) of the Deore LX
> 48/36/26 from Cambriabike


MBC has the Deore Octalink crank in either 44-32-22T or 48-36-26(silver
only). How does that compare to the European 48/36/26 Deore LX?

http://www.bikes.com.au/enter.html?target=ACCESSORIESMTB_ComponentsCranks.html

--

"The central problem with the concept of the 'Axis of Evil' is that it
involves an assumption that the US is the 'fulcrum of virtue'."
Bob Hawke
 
A

apologies

Guest
"DRS" <[email protected]> wrote:

>> 48/36/26 from Cambriabike

>
>MBC has the Deore Octalink crank in either 44-32-22T or 48-36-26(silver
>only). How does that compare to the European 48/36/26 Deore LX?


This would be a good quality product but you'll probably need to get a
new bottom bracket as this is splined.

The change in gearing from say 42/11 (1:3.82) to 48/11 (1:4.36) is
massive if your top speed is say 40km its going to be 45.7km with the
new ratio at the same cadence (woo hoo!).

Where it all falls down IMHO is in the lower gearing with where say
you might be doing 8km climbing you will now be doing 18 percent
faster for the same cadence. It may not sound like much but in terms
of effort and power output its a lot more.

IMHO and at the risk of sparking a riot I belivieve that cadence is
everything, if you cant spin it you cant climb it. Take a gander at
Lance he eats em alive and its not just guts and grit. By the way I'm
not comparing my feeble effort to Lances I'm just an old fart who
found a way to save his legs.

A great combination would be 48/34/22 but where do you get it or maybe
you can build it?


May all your cycling adventures be with a tailwind,

Neil.
 
D

DRS

Guest
forgetit (apologies) (tomuchspam) .com.au <@bsmail> wrote in message
[email protected]
> "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>> 48/36/26 from Cambriabike

>>
>> MBC has the Deore Octalink crank in either 44-32-22T or
>> 48-36-26(silver only). How does that compare to the European
>> 48/36/26 Deore LX?

>
> This would be a good quality product but you'll probably need to get a
> new bottom bracket as this is splined.


What does that mean?

> The change in gearing from say 42/11 (1:3.82) to 48/11 (1:4.36) is
> massive if your top speed is say 40km its going to be 45.7km with the
> new ratio at the same cadence (woo hoo!).


[...]

> A great combination would be 48/34/22 but where do you get it or maybe
> you can build it?


I don't know. Obviously you'd need to be able to get individual rings, for
starters, but if I could get a new large Shimano ring I wouldn't have to buy
a new crank, would I?

And which do you think made the greater, new tyres or a new 44/33/22 crank?

--

"I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two hours of bloody,
barbarous torture in gloating detail is considered indicia of religious
piety, whereas a mere second gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for
outraged apoplexy."
Betty Bowers, http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
 
A

apologies

Guest
"DRS" <[email protected]> wrote:


>> This would be a good quality product but you'll probably need to get a
>> new bottom bracket as this is splined.

>
>What does that mean?


The bottom bracket is the spindle and bearing arrangement that your
pedal cranks are fitted to. There a few different types - Tapered
square drive, splined and I think there is a variation of the splined
type. You can't fit splined cranks to a square bottom bracket and visa
versa.

>> A great combination would be 48/34/22 but where do you get it or maybe
>> you can build it?

>
>I don't know. Obviously you'd need to be able to get individual rings, for
>starters, but if I could get a new large Shimano ring I wouldn't have to buy
>a new crank, would I?
>
>And which do you think made the greater, new tyres or a new 44/33/22 crank


New tyres aren't going to change all that much unless your going from
slicks to knobbies but then you increase rolling resistance and are
likely to loose speed because of the extra effort to drive the tyres.

Have a look at Sheldon Browns site on all things bicycle it has a
wealth of info.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gearing/index.html

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

How many gears does your bike have?

Count the number of teeth on the sprockets on your wheel.
Do the same for your cranks.
Find out what your tyre circumference is by rolling the wheel along a
tape. Using the valve as the start and finish helps.

Then go to - http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

Have look at the gearing calculator then change the numbers on the
chain rings to match the set up you are considering.



May all your cycling adventures be with a tailwind,

Neil.