My view on buying a bike and Cycling.

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Ray1966, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. Ray1966

    Ray1966 Member

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    My name is Ray, and I’m 44 years old. I’ve been cycling for quite a long time now. Throughout the years, I’ve been quietly going out riding my 40 mile a day rides and just enjoying myself. I’m not a racer, or a competitive cyclist, I just enjoy the health benefits and overall pleasure you get from riding a bike. My bike of choice is the traditional Road Bike. But whatever kind, style or brand you ride is great as long as you’re out and riding.

    With the age of the Internet, and Forums such as this one bringing people together, I have noticed something that just bothers me. I know this will be sort of long, but I’ll try to keep it simple. Also, it’s not just about cycling; it applies to all forms of recreation or hobbies. But for this post I’m referring to cycling

    First up, the manufactures. Most of us are not rich, were not able to spend crazy amounts of money on a bicycle, nor do we need to spend a lot to enjoy Cycling. The only time you need to do that is if you race, or do competitive events. But for most of us it’s not necessary. But what bothers me, is how Manufactures list some of there bikes as “entry level, the perfect bike for the beginning cyclist”. Well I’m not a beginning Cyclist. I’m a Cyclist that because of life and responsibilities and bills to pay I’m on a tight budget. So the sales tactic they like to use is let’s shame people into spending more money on something by making them think, Hey, I’m not a beginner people may laugh at me or make fun of me or not ride with or talk to me if I ride this bike So I better get this more expensive model. The same goes for the snobby cyclist (More on that in a second).

    The second: The snobby cyclist that thinks if you don’t have or buy a multi thousand dollar ride, you’re not a cyclist. They will tell you you’re bike is good, BUT you may want to upgrade this or that, get one of these. Hell, I can afford it so can you. The shifters are the lower Sora or whatever the brand is there talking about. Well, I’ll tell you something. I ride a Giant Defy 3 with Sora. ( $700.00 Entry level beginner bike according to the company) This bike is very comfortable and it suits me to a T! I enjoy riding it everyday I’ve had this bike since 2009 and I have over 5000 miles on. I’ve never had one problem with the front or rear shifting. It’s still just as smooth and quiet today as it was the day I brought it home. That goes for any of the other components on the bike as well. Just keep up the maintained schedule (like you have to on any thing else) and you will be fine. Before The Giant, I rode a 1983 Trek model 613 road bike that I purchased new, still have and ride at least once a week.

    Now, I could go on and on, but I won’t I think you get a part of the picture. But I will say this. When it comes to Cycling, it doesn’t matter whether it’s an old bike, new bike, used bike or what style. It’s NOT a bike popularity contest, or a competition about who’s got the newest latest thing or upgrading to this or that. It IS about getting out on your bike, enjoying the outdoors, the good things that you’re doing for your health and body. Helping maintain your personal well being. Don’t be intimidated by people telling you to get this, or don’t get that. There not going to give you money to get it. So just follow this simple guideline.

    Figure out what kind of bike you want. Sit down and figure out your budget that you can afford to spend on a bike. Then go looking at all different brands. Test ride as many as you can. Write down what you liked and didn’t like. What bike was the most comfortable and felt the best. Don’t worry if it’s not the highest priced, most flashy bike in the area, it’s the bike YOU LIKE. Then once you find it, ride it with pride. Don’t be embarrassed or feel bad in anyway if it doesn’t have top of the line components on it. If it works well for the kind of riding you do, then that’s what matters. You purchased a bike to ride, not a bike to bring home and spend all your time, and money working on it or changing stuff out that isn’t necessary. And remember, if you run across these people that look down on you or give you advice that you need to do this or upgrade that. Just look at them and say (If they will talk to you that is) “I purchased this bike because I really like it. It’s comfortable and it suits and works well for me. For me, it’s about the riding and the benefits I get from it and I don’t really care about the image that everyone thinks I or we as cyclists should have.

    Also, if you want to wear a Cycling jersey with team logos on it, go right ahead. Some snobby cyclists say that a wearing a jersey with logos on it will make other cyclists laugh at you because you think you ride and or are sponsored by the company or team on the jersey. Well, if you run across one of these, just say. Ok, you can laugh all you want, but that means I can laugh at all the people wearing NASCAR, NFL, NBA, MLB and all other jerseys and jackets because I know they don’t work or play for them.

    So just have fun, put on what you want, go outside get on your bike and go for a nice care free ride and enjoy yourself. In the end, you can have the satisfaction of knowing you got the best bike you could get, the bike you liked the best and feel proud of it.

    Happy miles everyone.
     
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  2. clearlybored

    clearlybored New Member

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  3. moosensquirrel

    moosensquirrel New Member

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  4. cycleheimer

    cycleheimer New Member

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    Shopping for things is a hobby and interest in itself in this country. Vance Packard wrote about this back in the 1950s. Some people spend more time buying "the right bike" than riding it. This means that 5 to 10 years later a dedicated cyclist can come along and pick up an incredible deal when they do "sping cleaning".
     
  5. ProdigalCyclist

    ProdigalCyclist New Member

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  6. Reid2

    Reid2 Member

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    Thank you for your creation of a great article.

    Cycleheimer above also makes some good points.

    It is human nature to want to turn tools into status symbols or toys.

    That's OK in its way, as long as we have thread starters and article writers

    like the genius who started this topic. Thanks for reminding people to get out and ride:

    it's good for the body, mind, and for reminding the car-addicted public about what's best for humanity.
     
  7. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    well you can do just that thanks to manufacturers offering the wide range of accessories and bikes you initially criticized,
    Jan Ullrich, in his book, tells the story of the wall falling down in Berlin in 89, and how eastern germans saw 10 different brands of running shoes in western stores against 1 brand on the eastern stores, so i guess it is our western way of life we are talking about, otherwise good article and thank you for posting it !
     
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