new disc pads and squeal



Swoop

New Member
Feb 13, 2004
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ok so I have magura martas. I have recently changed the pads and also had to bleed the brakes ( long story) anyways.. I have good solid lever feel and ok stopping power......However, my brakes squeal like piggies. I have cleaned the rotors and pads...no help. I have made sure they are well aligned...which they seem to be pretty good. The only thing I can think is it the new pads are not yet broke in ..( I have only ridden once around campus for a test) Does this seem plausible? How long does it take for pads normally to break in? (they are EBC'S.) thanks.
 

jon8inch

New Member
Mar 9, 2005
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try this= drag your brake while going downhill, keep the brake engaged, squirt clean water on it and repeat as needed. this is the fastest way to bed in your brakes.
 

moparchris

New Member
Apr 13, 2004
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usually squeel from new pads is just because theyre not yet completely flat with the disc, also when you get new pads theyre usually slightly glassy on the surface so it takes a while to wear in, they should be fine after a ride or 2
 

Muddy Beast

New Member
Apr 3, 2005
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yeah what i do is clean the disc and wet them up then i walk around a little holding the disc enough so they'll move but not so loose that its not a little harder to do...and then you go fast downhill like was said before and do the same thing let the brakes drag on the way down, to the point were there about to or are squeling a little

~Scott
 

Conniebiker

New Member
Jan 1, 2005
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The reccomended method of bedding pads in is to do hard stops. What i like to do is ride around a parking lot or the like and sprint-to-stop until I see results. The squeaks have different tones. A brake that is not bedded yet will usually have a high frequency but smoothish scrape at low speed. A lubricated pad(like has fluid on it) will have a lower tone almost honking sound.
To remedy a lubricated pad, nothing works better in my experience than laquer thinner and 400 grit sandpaper. Wet the pad with the thinner(it evaporates very quickly, so lay it on) and rub it evenly on the paper, not running on the same patch of paper twice. Rewet and wipe on a white rag. If it comes off the rag test clean, then you have a clean pad and it can go back to the bedding stage. If it produces a black streak then repeat the sanding stage.
It is important to be sure of the difference because if you use the pads to operating temp the contaminant will wick into the pad and be nearly impossible to remove.
One other method, if you can to bed the pads is to find a trail. Not a fast or risky one, but a nice singletrack. The instant grabbing of the braking would be what you want but it would be more interesting than wandering a parking lot;).