New to Road Cycling(Eggbeaters)

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by coolny29, Apr 27, 2010.

  1. coolny29

    coolny29 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been Mountain biking for several years and have just bought a Road Bike. I would like to use my egg beater pedals with it, will I have any problems? I have used mine for a couple of years on my mountain bike and love them.
     
    Tags:


  2. Hewerrr

    Hewerrr New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    I commuted on the road with eggbeaters for a couple of years (20 miles one way), did some centuries and stuff with them, and I liked them a lot. When I wore the bearings out on one, I decided to try a more traditional road pedal, and I like them better. There's a bigger platform to push on, and my feet feel more secure. I've had to get used to less float, and I've had to fuss with the new pedals more to get my position dialed in with them, but once I got it, it felt like I got a whole new stiffer, more responsive drivetrain. I feel like the power from my legs goes more directly into the cranks. I don't know if that's actually the case, but the eggbeaters just felt a little sloppy by comparison. But, yeah, you can use eggbeaters, and they'll do just fine- I just think road specific pedals feel better on the road. I still use my eggbeaters on my mountain bike. One thing to keep in mind that I just thought of- make sure your road shoes will accept the two bolt configuration the eggbeaters need. You can get an adapter if you need to, so it's just something to be aware of.
     
  3. gordonharris912

    gordonharris912 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    No problem -- I always use light mountain bike shoes and spd pedals on my road bike so I can walk normally .

    Gordon Harris
    www.bikenewengland.com
     
  4. JML

    JML New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have Eggbeaters on my road bike, and I love them.

    I used to ride regular quill pedals with clips and straps, of course, back in the old days (MKS, SunTour Superbe, Campy SL), and then used Campy/Look, Ritchey, and Time ATAC (on my mountain bike). I put Eggbeaters on my bike after trying my son's cross bike with Eggbeaters. The Eggbeater design is very similar to the Time and Look spring-loaded bar design, but lighter and more simple.

    I can use them with either my road shoes or my mountain shoes (i.e., shoes with recessed cleat fittings that let me walk like a human being). Easy to click in and release. Easy to clean if needed, easy to rebuild, and very nicely made. Plus the design doesn't change every year or two, with a huge price increase! I have not experienced any hot spots from these, but that depends much on your shoes (I have Carnac shoes).

    Road pedals may claim to have more surface area for an extended contact between shoe sole and cleat, but I can't see any significant difference that isn't otherwise probably affected even more by the sole of the shoe. Others may feel differently, and do; you'll find reports all over the spectrum. But any sole these days is so stiff that if the shoe fits, it reduces the chance for any hotspots caused by a small cleat that is otherwise fitted correctly onto the sole.

    One might claim there's more clearance in turns, but I don't race, and most of the pedals that clamp onto a large cleat have far more depth below the spindle than do the Eggbeaters. I've seen several pictures of pro and top amateur road racing bikes fitted with Eggbeaters.

    Of course, the cycling world is full of differing opinions on this.

    I had to cut away some of the tread on my mountain shoes to clear the Eggbeater spindle, but that kind of modification is frequently needed with any pedal system. It's easy to do with a Dremel rotary tool or with a grinding/sharpening stone mounted in an electric drill.

    I have to say that the price of shoes and pedals is just astronomical nowadays. From the manufacturers' perspective, it must be the perfect blend of attire and componentry that yields greater profit per item than anything else in cycling.

    View attachment 12048 View attachment 12049
     
  5. coolny29

    coolny29 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks to all for your input. After a couple of longer rides 40 and 50k I have decided to keep my eggbeaters. Since my mtb shoes are kind off scruffy I went out and bought some mid level shimano road shoes and quattro adaptors so I can use the eggbeater cleats.

    I am very happy with this set up.

    Rob
     
  6. JML

    JML New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    One suggestion: clean off any grease from the pedal spindle threads and crank arm threads. Then apply silver antiseize compound and remount the pedals.

    Grease is meant for moving parts, and antiseize is meant to do exactly what the name suggests: preventing parts from seizing together and from corroding, especially when the parts are dissimilar metals. It's much, much easier to disassemble later on. IMHO, this is even more important when the pedal spindles have the internal hex fitting design of the Eggbeaters, which is much more easily stripped out than external wrench flats on the spindle.

    There's nothing better for the threads on pedal spindles, bottom brackets, etc., or for slide-fit items like seatposts.

    To remove excess, just use isopropyl alcohol on a rag.
     
Loading...