Onboard Bicycle Maintenance Pack

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gary, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Hi,

    I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering what
    kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture Repair kit?
    Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said Allan Keys may
    be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a small rucksack.

    Thanks for any tips!

    Gary.
     
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  2. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sat, 04 Jan 2003 17:50:11 GMT, "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering what
    >kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture Repair kit?
    >Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said Allan Keys may
    >be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a small rucksack.

    Hello Gary.

    As a novice about to embark on 4 hours of cycling a day I suggest the most important piece of
    "maintenance equipment" you should carry is a spare arse. You'll need it.

    I admire your enthusiasm but you may wish to work gradually up to that sort of time in the saddle
    mate. If you want to spend a good while on the bike each day then getting some proper padded
    cycling shorts should be a priority for you, even if you wear them underneath something else. The
    seams and fabric of regular trousers, jeans etc are likely to be very painful if you intend riding
    for hours daily.

    Anyway, to answer your question, different people carry different amounts of maintenance stuff.
    Myself I keep things pretty simple, I take a spare innertube, some puncture repair patches, a tyre
    boot, a small allen key minitool and a minipump. A bit of cash for emergencies is handy if you're
    planning to travel a fair way from home.

    The allen keys are useful because the components on most modern bikes (of reasonable quality) use
    allen bolts instead of nuts. This means that with just a few allen keys you can adjust or repair
    almost anything on your bike. Very handy if you have mechanical trouble while out and about.

    These few bits all go into a very small seat pack which clips under the saddle out of the way, my
    pump attaches to the bike frame via it's own bracket thingy.

    If you want to carry more, like a waterproof or some lunch for example, you can get larger sized
    seat packs or a rack which will fix over your rear wheel and allow you to fit pannier bags. I find
    wearing a rucksack quite uncomfortable on the bike (sweaty back!) but others seem quite happy
    carrying loads that way. You'll have to see if it suits you.

    Have a browse around here:

    http://www.edinburgh-bicycle.co.uk/catalogue/

    Look in the "accessories and components" section and you'l find headings for bags, seat packs,
    minitools, minipumps, puncture repair stuff.... all kinds of goodies. It should give you an idea of
    what's available and what you may want to carry yourself.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  3. Simon Galgut

    Simon Galgut Guest

    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next
    week
    > and I am wondering what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand
    > pump? Puncture Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me.
    > Someone also said Allan Keys may be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I
    > don't mind wearing a small rucksack.

    You're going from nothing to 3 - 4 hours per day ??? Good luck

    I do a couple of hours daily, mainly on-road, and nowhere too far from civilisation, and have so far
    survived with nothing more than one spare tube and a small pump strapped to the frame. You may wish
    to take two tubes, tyre levers if your thumbs are not strong enough and a small multi-tool. A credit
    card should cover all other emergencies.

    All the above can be easily stowed in the pockets of a cycling jersey.

    Regards Simon
     
  4. Gary

    Gary Guest

    > Hello Gary.
    >
    > As a novice about to embark on 4 hours of cycling a day I suggest the most important piece of
    > "maintenance equipment" you should carry is a spare arse. You'll need it.

    Haha, made me laugh. :) I remember an old racer I had - the seat was as solid as a rock. Not
    comfortable at all. The bike has some "gell filled" number, but im guessing after a few hours it
    will make no difference.

    > I admire your enthusiasm but you may wish to work gradually up to that sort of time in the saddle
    > mate. If you want to spend a good while on the bike each day then getting some proper padded
    > cycling shorts should be a priority for you, even if you wear them underneath something else. The
    > seams and fabric of regular trousers, jeans etc are likely to be very painful if you intend riding
    > for hours daily.

    You are probably right - I am a little over enthusiastic, cant wait to get out on the road again. 4
    hours seemed a reasonable timescale, but when I think about it carefully, it is a hell of a lot of
    cycling. Maybe an hour or two to start with.

    Thanks for the advice on equipment - you mentioned a "Tyre Boot" - what is this item? What is
    it used for?

    Thanks for all the help,

    Gary.
     
  5. In news:[email protected],

    > most important piece of "maintenance equipment" you should carry is a spare arse.

    why should Gary have to give those pro-speeding cagers a lift on his pannier rack when they have
    been banned from driving? doesn't seem fair to me. I thought we were supposed to be *encouraging*
    the newbies ;)

    Alex
     
  6. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sat, 04 Jan 2003 18:27:42 GMT, "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I remember an old racer I had - the seat was as solid as a rock. Not comfortable at all. The bike
    >has some "gell filled" number, but im guessing after a few hours it will make no difference.

    Yep, I think it's more important to allow your backside time to adapt to cycling again than worry
    about gel this or super padded that. It's likely to be a bit uncomfortable to start with but after a
    few days (perhaps a week or two) you'll find things have toughened up and be quite happy sitting on
    what you might initially have thought a really hard saddle.

    >> I admire your enthusiasm but you may wish to work gradually up to that sort of time in the
    >> saddle mate.

    >You are probably right - I am a little over enthusiastic, cant wait to get out on the road again. 4
    >hours seemed a reasonable timescale, but when I think about it carefully, it is a hell of a lot of
    >cycling. Maybe an hour or two to start with.

    My advice would be to take it steady at first. There's nothing to stop you going out for hours on
    end if you feel up to it and are enjoying the ride, but, hours everyday might be a bit ambitious to
    start. Remember, you don't actually have to work hard all the time you are out on the bike, take it
    easy on the hills, and go a bit faster when you find stretches that are fun.

    What you may find is that going out every day doesn't give your body the time it needs to recover
    from what will be a long forgotten exercise.

    >Thanks for the advice on equipment - you mentioned a "Tyre Boot" - what is this item? What is it
    >used for?

    It's really just a puncture repair patch for the tyre, as opposed to the innertube. A tyre boot is
    useful if you are unfortunate enough to get a slash or rip in your tyre. If this happens the air
    pressure in the innertube will push it through the hole in the tyre and it will be unrideable. A
    boot can be stuck inside the tyre to temporarily patch the rip and allow you to ride home. They're
    cheap, small and lightweight so no bother to stash a couple in with your other repair stuff.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  7. David Green

    David Green Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> asked in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > David Green wrote:
    > >
    > > What I carry:
    > >
    > > -spare inner tube (1 or 2, tightly rolled, wrapped in clingfilm)
    >
    > Why the clingfilm?

    I find it protects the tube from damage, and it helps keep it in a nice neat (and small) bundle.

    David Green
     
  8. David Green

    David Green Guest

  9. OK, I have done this, which is why I started carrying a cable. It really soesn't add much weight.

    --

    Martin Bulmer "Mixless Foot Persuasion"

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Martin Bulmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > This is probably not advisable, but one thing I definitely wouldn't be without, having needed
    > it
    > > in the middle of nowhere a couple of times, is a spare gear cable.
    >
    > More compact alternative: Extra long rear mech limit screw*. Won't be able to change gears at the
    > back but at least you can get the chain to stay on a low/middle sprocket to make riding home
    > reasonably comfortable.
    >
    > * These use common metric threads so might find something suitable from junk lying around the
    > house, etc.
    >
    > ~PB
     
  10. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

  11. Bert Smith

    Bert Smith Guest

    Gordon BP <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Bert Smith scribed after much navel searching:
    > > I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
    > > following:
    > >
    > snip
    >
    > Good grief! why not have a sag wagon follow you with a spare bike? :)

    Hey, not fair! My OBBMP is small - only 20cm long and 750g, as mentioned in previous post. That is
    not much for peace of mind on a 150 mile bike ride. I have used, at some point, every single tool in
    the bag. A sag waggon would weigh at least 1000x as much (though it's a nice idea...)
     
  12. Gordon Bp

    Gordon Bp Guest

    Bert Smith scribed after much navel searching:
    > Gordon BP <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Bert Smith scribed after much navel searching:
    >>
    >>>I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
    >>>following:
    >>>
    >>
    >>snip
    >>
    >>Good grief! why not have a sag wagon follow you with a spare bike? :)
    >
    >
    > Hey, not fair! My OBBMP is small - only 20cm long and 750g, as mentioned in previous post. That is
    > not much for peace of mind on a 150 mile bike ride. I have used, at some point, every single tool
    > in the bag. A sag waggon would weigh at least 1000x as much (though it's a nice idea...)
    Well on a 70 mile training ride I would take 2 tyre levers (3 are unneccesary),2 spare tubes, chain
    link tool,spare chain link, small pliers, small adjustable spanner, a combination screwdriver, a
    spare rear gear cable, a spare rear brake cable and a folding tyre. This would all wrap up in the
    racing cape and be carried under the saddle with a spare toestrap!
     
  13. Gordon Bp

    Gordon Bp Guest

    Call me Bob scribed after much navel searching:
    > On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 16:30:37 +0000, Gordon BP <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Well on a 70 mile training ride I would take 2 tyre levers (3 are unneccesary),2 spare tubes,
    >>chain link tool,spare chain link, small pliers, small adjustable spanner, a combination
    >>screwdriver, a spare rear gear cable, a spare rear brake cable and a folding tyre. This would all
    >>wrap up in the racing cape and be carried under the saddle with a spare toestrap!
    >
    >
    > What happens if you want to use your racing cape?
    >
    >
    > Bob
    > --
    > Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
    the actual tools and spares used to be in a carrier bag, then wrapped in the racing cape, so when
    the cape was in use, the carrier bag was strapped under the saddle.
     
  14. On Mon, 06 Jan 2003 21:03:13 +0000, Richard Bates
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 06 Jan 2003 20:56:00 GMT, "elyob" <[email protected]> in
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Everyone is missing the most important tool. A bottle opener - great for stopping yourself by a
    > > nice river on the way home with a cool beer.
    > [..] Hmmm - perhaps there should be a cool tool addon for opening bottles?

    I carry a parks tool, the one with all the useful hex wrench sizes on the bike, and a SOG paratool
    sysadmin knife on me. Of course, given the intended owner, the latter already has a bottle opener
    designed in.

    --
    Andrew Chadwick <Secure beneath the watchful eyes
     
  15. Bert Smith

    Bert Smith Guest

    I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
    following:

    1) Puncture repair kit (smallest I can find, 7cm long). This is a small plastic box and contains
    the small items list below.
    2) Spare spokes for rear wheel x 4
    3) Spare spoke nipples x 4
    4) Spoke key of correct size (smallest I could find, Topeak 14g (.127in) spoke key from SJSC)
    5) Complete set of Shimano V-brake buts and bolts, plus 4 blocks.
    6) Park chain splitter
    7) Tyre boot cut from knackered tyre
    8) Bolts of various sizes
    9) Pathetically inadequate pedal spanner - only 6cm long (but my pedals do come off quite
    regularly, so it does work, but you wouldn't want to use it often)
    10) Topeak allen key set - contains all the allen keys I need for my bike, plus flat and cross head
    screw drivers for durailler adjustment
    11) Cassette cracker (need to find a friend who has the correct spanner size for this, but I reckon
    that finding a friendly garagae is easier than fniding a friendly garage with a cassette
    cracker, or a bike shop)
    12) Crank puller (similar logic)
    13) tyre levers x 3
    14) small pliers for pulling out the split pins in V-brake blocks
    15) lightweight inner tube (need to change this depending on whether I am road or MTBing) wrapped in
    16) j cloth for cleaning hands or bike bits
    17) Square nut the right size so that the crank puller works with hollow bottom brackets
    18) Small cross head screw driver to adjust those half moon thingies in Shimano v-brake levers

    Whole lot fits in 20cm wedgie, and weighs 750g.

    Future adjustments:
    19) Get happy with my v-brakes so I can ditch #18.
    20) Get self extracting crank bolts so I can ditch #12.
    21) Get hyper cracker to replace #11 so that I can crack the cassette without any other tools.

    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering
    > what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture
    > Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said
    > Allan Keys may be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a
    > small rucksack.
    >
    > Thanks for any tips!
    >
    > Gary.
     
  16. Bert Smith

    Bert Smith Guest

    Forgot:

    Also:

    Blackurn AS1 mini pump. Water bottle(s) for rides longer than 45mins Mobile phone Cash and credit
    card in case of disaster Food (bananas, flapjacks etc) for rides longer than 1.5hrs Rain proofs

    > From: [email protected] (Bert Smith) Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Subject: Re: Onboard
    > Bicycle Maintenance Pack References: <[email protected]>
    > NNTP-Posting-Host: 217.37.216.97 Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >
    > I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
    > following:
    >
    > 1) Puncture repair kit (smallest I can find, 7cm long). This is a small plastic box and contains
    > the small items list below.
    <snip>

    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering
    > what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture
    > Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said
    > Allan Keys may be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a
    > small rucksack.
    >
    > Thanks for any tips!
    >
    > Gary.
     
  17. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Gary wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to be doing roughly 3 - 4 hours of cycling daily as of next week and I am wondering
    > what kind of "Maintenance Equipment" I should carry? For example Foot or Hand pump? Puncture
    > Repair kit? Spare Tube? I am a novice, and have no idea what to take with me. Someone also said
    > Allan Keys may be handy. Also, should I get a kit that packs on the bike? I don't mind wearing a
    > small rucksack.
    >
    > Thanks for any tips!
    >
    > Gary.

    On a similar note, where can you get patches _small_ enough for narrow inner tubes < 27mm.

    I always find the patches are so big that they overlap the edges of the (flattened) inner tube and
    are a git to get them to stick.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  18. Gordon Bp

    Gordon Bp Guest

    Bert Smith scribed after much navel searching:
    > I have the same small wedgie for mtbing, commuting, audax and short road rides. It contains the
    > following:
    >
    snip

    Good grief! why not have a sag wagon follow you with a spare bike? :)
     
  19. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    AndyMorris wrote:
    > On a similar note, where can you get patches _small_ enough for narrow inner tubes < 27mm.

    I recommend 15mm round Velox patches from http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk - which I use succesfully with
    19-23 tubes. (They also do larger patches)

    > I always find the patches are so big that they overlap the edges of the (flattened) inner tube and
    > are a git to get them to stick.

    ...These patches are quite thin and have feathered edges so will stick well even when overlapping
    edges or ridges (if use method below).

    Best method: (you probably do this already, but for benefit of anyone interested...)
    1. Sand and apply a coating of rubber cement to area on tube larger than patch
    2. Allow to completely dry (rubber cement is a dry contact adhesive)
    3. Apply patch (without any added cement), press down firmly. This will usually work but if any
    edges don't stick, add cement (under and on top of patch edge) - wait until tacky then press
    and hold down, repeat as necessary
    4. Chalk/talc
    5. If convenient, leave to cure for several hours before inflating

    ~PB
     
  20. Bert Smith

    Bert Smith Guest

    I use Rema Tip Top.

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > On a similar note, where can you get patches _small_ enough for narrow inner tubes < 27mm.
    >
    > I always find the patches are so big that they overlap the edges of the (flattened) inner tube and
    > are a git to get them to stick.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Andy Morris
    >
    > AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK
    >
    >
    > Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    > http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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