Preventing flats

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Daniel Crispin, Jul 10, 2004.

  1. Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible place
    and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)

    Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on installing a
    kevlar tire to reduce the risk.

    I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    worth it?
     
    Tags:


  2. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    effect on efficiency.


    "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible place
    > and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)
    >
    > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on installing

    a
    > kevlar tire to reduce the risk.
    >
    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    > flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?
    >
    >
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    > tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    > effect on efficiency.


    Doesn't work as well as a kevlar belted tire. Also, some people report that
    the inserts flats themselves through friction or rough edges.
     
  4. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible place
    > and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)


    Do you know for certain what caused the flat?
    >
    > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on installing

    a
    > kevlar tire to reduce the risk.


    Kevlar-belted tires can help against some kinds of punctures. Not much use
    against pinch-flats or flats caused by rim problems or rim tape issues.

    Be sure you know what actually caused your flat before you panic.
    >
    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    > flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?


    Mr Tuffy and similar strips add a layer of kevlar or similar material, for
    additional protection from punctures. On a bike with wide tires and heavy
    wheels you probably won't notice their presence. On a bike built for speed
    they will slow you down a bit.

    RichC
     
  5. AMG

    AMG Guest

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:19:07 -0400, Daniel Crispin wrote:

    > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible place
    > and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)
    >
    > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on installing a
    > kevlar tire to reduce the risk.
    >
    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    > flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?


    One other procedure that might be useful: Check your tires periodically
    for little bits of embedded glass or metal that haven't yet worked their
    way in deep enough to puncture the tube. Often, little shards will stick
    in the surface layer of the tire, then gradually be forced in deeper and
    deeper as you ride. When they eventually penetrate the tube, pffffft...

    If you do a careful inspection now and then (especially if you ride
    through much broken glass, or in other industrial-wasteland-type
    environments), you will probably find a couple of small, sharp objects
    embedded in your tires, which you can then remove (carefully, of course,
    lest you inflict a puncture yourself), possibly averting a flat before it
    occurs. An ounce of prevention...

    Now that I mention it, I'd better go and check my tires...

    AMG
     
  6. Daniel Crispin wrote:
    > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible place
    > and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)
    >
    > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on installing a
    > kevlar tire to reduce the risk.
    >
    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    > flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?


    We talked about this on a club ride yesterday.

    I tried kevlar-belted tires for a year or more. I noticed the increased
    rolling resistance more than I noticed a reduction in flats. The guy on
    the ride who was using them (they came on his brand new touring bike)
    seemed to agree. And Mr. Tuffy tire liners got the same review.
    Several people had tried them, then given them up.

    I don't doubt these things can help somewhat, but they're certainly not
    cures. Far more effective is to watch the road surface and avoid the
    glass and trash. In particular, stay in the area that the car's right
    tires sweep clean, at least as much as you possibly can.

    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  7. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 02:48:03 +0000, Ken wrote:

    >
    > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >> yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    >> tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    >> effect on efficiency.

    >
    > Doesn't work as well as a kevlar belted tire. Also, some people report
    > that the inserts flats themselves through friction or rough edges.


    They can indeed have an effect on handling and efficiency since the tire
    will effectively be stiffened slightly, losing suppleness. I just think
    they feel "weird" but that's pretty subjective. Worth a shot I guess, I've
    heard folks rave about them, so they can't be totally dismissed either. :D

    A Kevlar belted tire's a good bet. They aren't foolproof, if you get a
    piece of glass stuck in the tread, it will work it's way in slowly, so
    it's worth having a quick gander at your tires after every ride.

    Do carry a patch kit and inflation device/pump and learn to use
    it--consider flats part of the challenge of cycling, just like a pit stop
    for auto racers--it's par for the course. I can personally get back on the
    road in 5 minutes or so with my road bike. I don't even remove the wheel,
    just open the tire on one side, slip out the tube, patch, inflate and
    ride. Never had a patch fail in over twenty years of riding either.

    Proper inflation is crucial, and think about tire style. Are you on a
    super racy bike, or a mtb, or hybrid? It might be worth looking for a
    little heavier rubber in addition to the kevlar. I run 70x25s while most
    other folks around here use 21s and 23s on their sport bikes--I find just
    that added bit of width helps enormously. If I had a cyclocross bike or
    touring ride that could handle the width, I'd probably go for some 32mm
    wide touring tires since I ride solo and worry more about long distance
    comfort.

    In my experience, if you get more than one flat per thousand miles on a
    regular basis, there's something amiss. Between my city and sport bikes, I
    average a flat every 1000 -2000 miles, the sportier ride getting perhaps
    50% more flats due to the thinner rubber.

    As always, YMMV.

    :D
     
  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:48:33 -0400, Rich Clark wrote:

    > Kevlar-belted tires can help against some kinds of punctures. Not much use
    > against pinch-flats or flats caused by rim problems or rim tape issues.
    >
    > Be sure you know what actually caused your flat before you panic.


    well said--check your rims for rough spots on the inside, with particular
    attention to the valve hole. sometimes you have to smooth it with a round
    file--though I'm a lazy bastard and often "soften" the edges with
    electrical tape.
     
  9. Daniel Crispin wrote:
    > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible
    > place and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)
    >
    > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on
    > installing a kevlar tire to reduce the risk.
    >
    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to
    > prevent flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?


    Carry one or two spare tubes and a pump. Learn to replace a tube in less
    than ten minutes and then you wont bother worrying about flats anymore.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  10. Collin

    Collin Guest

    Ken wrote:

    > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    >>tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    >>effect on efficiency.


    I concur. I have some Mr. Tuffys I've used for over ten years and never
    had a flat with them. They increase rolling resistence a little - it's
    barely noticeable.
    >
    >
    > Doesn't work as well as a kevlar belted tire. Also, some people report that
    > the inserts flats themselves through friction or rough edges.


    I disagree. I think the quality of the tire is a more important factor.
    My on-sale kevlars a full of holes and I got plenty of flats. I
    re-instlled the Mr. Tuffys and haven't had a flat since.

    Installation is important. A folded Mr. Tuffy WILL abrade your tube and
    give you flats. Of course, the little bump every tire revolution will
    annoy you first.
     
  11. > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside
    > the tire to prevent flats... anyone ever used it?


    I've been using two such items for years: the Mr. Tuffy liner, which
    goes between tube and tyre, and the Slime sealant that goes inside the tube.

    > Is it worth it?


    It is to me, because I use my bike to commute to work on ugly urban
    streets littered with broken glass and construction debris, and I'd
    rather not be patching punctures or changing tubes on my way to work in
    the morning, or on my way home in the evening. The liners and the
    sealant add some additional weight (few hundred grams) and rolling
    resistance (few watts), but who's counting?

    --
    Robots don't kill people -- people kill people.
    http://www.irobotmovie.com/
     
  12. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    maxo wrote in part:

    << In my experience, if you get more than one flat per thousand miles on a
    regular basis, there's something amiss. >>

    I totally agree. I flat about once every 400 miles and something is definitely
    amiss. I think it's the thorns.

    Robert
     
  13. Bob in CT

    Bob in CT Guest

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 02:48:03 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >> yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    >> tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    >> effect on efficiency.

    >
    > Doesn't work as well as a kevlar belted tire. Also, some people report
    > that
    > the inserts flats themselves through friction or rough edges.


    I've only had that happen once, out of the many miles I've used them.
    They help a lot (and better than my previous kevlar-belted tire). I have
    had flats, though. One flat was caused by a small nail that must've been
    perfectly upright, as it went through everything.

    --
    Bob in CT
    Remove ".x" to reply
     
  14. Palookabutt

    Palookabutt Guest

    > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to prevent
    > flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > worth it?


    I've been commuting for about 8 years now. After a number of
    "learning experiences", I've settled on the following setup:

    1. Slime in my tubes: worth every penny, in my experience -- I love
    the stuff. In most cases, if a tire gets low I'll find something in
    the tire. As soon as I remove it, the slime takes over and I can just
    pump it back up. I can always change the tube when I get where I'm
    going.

    2. Tire liners: seem to work well on thorns, sticks and small bits of
    glass.

    3. Spare tube: easier and faster than a patch, especially in the dark
    or rain.

    4. High-quality pump - I keep mine in a plastic bag in a pannier or
    knapsack and not on the frame.

    Some of this might seem like overkill, but I expect to commute in all
    kinds of conditions. The last thing I'd want on a cold, rainy night
    is a flat and only a patch kit and a finicky pump to get me home.
     
  15. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 16:03:25 GMT, Bob in CT <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I've only had that happen once, out of the many miles I've used them.
    >They help a lot (and better than my previous kevlar-belted tire). I have
    >had flats, though. One flat was caused by a small nail that must've been
    >perfectly upright, as it went through everything.


    I'm just hoping my uh, competitors on the bike trail don't pick up on
    this - you know the militant dog walkers...nuff said.

    -B
     
  16. flatline

    flatline Guest

    I use a Mr Tuffy liner on my rear 23x700c rear tire only. It has
    worked very well for me. I've picked out more than six pieces of
    glass from the tire rubber on my last rear tire and I think only liner
    prevented the glass from penetrating into the tube. The tire was full
    of cut holes when I finally discarded it after it wore thin.
    But I had to to cover the seam edge on the liner to avoid wearing hole
    in the tube.
     
  17. Well I think patches are a pain... I will start carring a spare tube
    instead, they only cost 5$ anyhow so it's not really expensive.

    As for the tires, I went to my LBS and he completelly refused to sell me Mr
    Tuffy (or what ever it is called) ;) He said that
    after a while the corners start to lift and puncture the tube. He suggested
    I use better tires instead. Showed me one made by
    specialized that is kevlar belted and has a central band much thicker than
    the rest of the tire, so there is more space between the body of the tire
    and the road. Only 33$ per tire. I will have both tire replaced this
    Thursday.

    My tires are 700 but I am not sure of the with... I think it's 32 but I
    could be wrong ... it's an Hybrid with standard size hybrid
    tires (if there is such a thing).

    I think the new tires can also take higher pressure (100 pounds compared to
    85 pounds for my current tires)... that should make
    for a smoother ride.



    "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 02:48:03 +0000, Ken wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > news:[email protected]:
    > >> yes, i have some kind of green strip thingys that go between the tube &
    > >> tire. havent had a flat since i installed them but wonder there is any
    > >> effect on efficiency.

    > >
    > > Doesn't work as well as a kevlar belted tire. Also, some people report
    > > that the inserts flats themselves through friction or rough edges.

    >
    > They can indeed have an effect on handling and efficiency since the tire
    > will effectively be stiffened slightly, losing suppleness. I just think
    > they feel "weird" but that's pretty subjective. Worth a shot I guess, I've
    > heard folks rave about them, so they can't be totally dismissed either. :D
    >
    > A Kevlar belted tire's a good bet. They aren't foolproof, if you get a
    > piece of glass stuck in the tread, it will work it's way in slowly, so
    > it's worth having a quick gander at your tires after every ride.
    >
    > Do carry a patch kit and inflation device/pump and learn to use
    > it--consider flats part of the challenge of cycling, just like a pit stop
    > for auto racers--it's par for the course. I can personally get back on the
    > road in 5 minutes or so with my road bike. I don't even remove the wheel,
    > just open the tire on one side, slip out the tube, patch, inflate and
    > ride. Never had a patch fail in over twenty years of riding either.
    >
    > Proper inflation is crucial, and think about tire style. Are you on a
    > super racy bike, or a mtb, or hybrid? It might be worth looking for a
    > little heavier rubber in addition to the kevlar. I run 70x25s while most
    > other folks around here use 21s and 23s on their sport bikes--I find just
    > that added bit of width helps enormously. If I had a cyclocross bike or
    > touring ride that could handle the width, I'd probably go for some 32mm
    > wide touring tires since I ride solo and worry more about long distance
    > comfort.
    >
    > In my experience, if you get more than one flat per thousand miles on a
    > regular basis, there's something amiss. Between my city and sport bikes, I
    > average a flat every 1000 -2000 miles, the sportier ride getting perhaps
    > 50% more flats due to the thinner rubber.
    >
    > As always, YMMV.
    >
    > :D
    >
     
  18. Exactly what I am planing to do ;)

    I am also thinking about changing to the other type of valve... can't
    remember the name... from what I ear it doesn't leak
    air like a regular valve do.


    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Daniel Crispin wrote:
    > > Well tonight I got my first flat with my new bike... worst possible
    > > place and time too (don't we just love Murphy? ;)
    > >
    > > Anyhow, tomorrow I will have to go to the bike shop, I plan on
    > > installing a kevlar tire to reduce the risk.
    > >
    > > I also heard of a product that can be installed inside the tire to
    > > prevent flats... anyone ever used it? Is it
    > > worth it?

    >
    > Carry one or two spare tubes and a pump. Learn to replace a tube in less
    > than ten minutes and then you wont bother worrying about flats anymore.
    >
    > --
    > Perre
    >
    > You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
    >
    >
     
  19. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    After all this talk about mr tuffy i went to inspect my commuter tires
    (23's). i think the tuffy has prevented flats because the tire was really
    shot with a couple of spots where small chunks of tire were missing and wire
    coming out, and there was some debris inside.

    "flatline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I use a Mr Tuffy liner on my rear 23x700c rear tire only. It has
    > worked very well for me. I've picked out more than six pieces of
    > glass from the tire rubber on my last rear tire and I think only liner
    > prevented the glass from penetrating into the tube. The tire was full
    > of cut holes when I finally discarded it after it wore thin.
    > But I had to to cover the seam edge on the liner to avoid wearing hole
    > in the tube.
     
  20. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 20:05:23 -0400, "Daniel Crispin"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Well I think patches are a pain... I will start carring a spare tube
    >instead, they only cost 5$ anyhow so it's not really expensive.
    >
    >As for the tires, I went to my LBS and he completelly refused to sell me Mr
    >Tuffy (or what ever it is called) ;) He said that
    >after a while the corners start to lift and puncture the tube. He suggested
    >I use better tires instead. Showed me one made by
    >specialized that is kevlar belted and has a central band much thicker than
    >the rest of the tire, so there is more space between the body of the tire
    >and the road. Only 33$ per tire. I will have both tire replaced this
    >Thursday.
    >
    >My tires are 700 but I am not sure of the with... I think it's 32 but I
    >could be wrong ... it's an Hybrid with standard size hybrid
    >tires (if there is such a thing).
    >
    >I think the new tires can also take higher pressure (100 pounds compared to
    >85 pounds for my current tires)... that should make
    >for a smoother ride.
    >
    >


    Hi, a spare tube is a good idea, but not "instead" of a patch kit. You
    could have more than one flat, or as recently happened to me. My brand
    new spare tube had a hole in it. I had to patch the tube, before I
    could use it.

    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
Loading...
Loading...