Provision for emergencies

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mark, May 8, 2003.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring up
    to plead to come & pick me up, for example.

    Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?

    Ta

    Mark
     
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  2. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?

    Carry enough money with you to get a taxi, then find a good mini cab firm with a people carrier that
    will carry bikes free of charge. That was my solution when I was cycling in Wales away from family
    and friends who lived in London.

    Gadget
     
  3. Mark wrote:
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?

    You could consider joining the ETA, they offer a bicycle recovery scheme. Unfortunately, they don't
    send out Michael Palin to repair your bike in situ but they will get you to the nearest bike repair
    shop---though I expect there's some small print involved.

    Colin
     
  4. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?

    Anything more serious happens rarely. In the last 10 years I've had 3 'incidents' that stopped me.
    (A chain broke, a rear axel broke and the chain wheels fell apart).

    1 was within 3 miles of home so I walked, 2 required a friendly local to store the bike in his
    garden while I taxied home, showered and drove back to get the bike and 3 resulted in some bodging
    and a very gentle last 20 miles.

    Unless you are cycling across Siberia or up the Orinoco there is always a solution :)

    T
     
  5. "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Carry enough money with you to get a taxi, then find a good mini cab firm with a people carrier
    > that will carry bikes free of charge....

    Wouldn't a bike easily fit in a standard car with both wheels removed?
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Mark" wrote ...
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?
    >
    > Ta
    >
    > Mark

    The bus system where I live will transport bicycles during the summer months- is this an option for
    you? I've got a few tools that I carry (chain tool, spare power link), and I try to keep the bike in
    good repair so that it won't break at too inopportune a moment. I also carry a cell phone so that I
    could, if necessary, call a taxi for a ride home or to work, or let my employer know that I will be
    a few minutes (hours?) late.

    --
    mark
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Guest

    > The bus system where I live will transport bicycles during the summer months- is this an option
    > for you?

    Thanks for the thought, but there *isn't* a bus system where I am. Hence the ride.

    Mark
     
  8. In news:[email protected], Mark
    <[email protected]> typed:
    >> The bus system where I live will transport bicycles during the summer months- is this an option
    >> for you?
    >
    > Thanks for the thought, but there *isn't* a bus system where I am. Hence the ride.
    >
    Black cabs take bikes reasonably happily. But then again, they only operate where there's a bus
    service, don't they.
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Mark wrote:
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?

    Keep bike in tip top condition, practice some maintenance, carry some tools and you'll most likely
    be able to proceed somehow.

    If anything _really_ serious happens, you'll get a free taxi service. Look out for the large white
    vehicles with flashing blue lights.

    ~PB
     
  10. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    > Wouldn't a bike easily fit in a standard car with both wheels removed?
    >
    >

    Usually yes, but most cabbies don't like having to put back seat down or resting the forks on the
    backseat. Plus I didn't see many black cabs up in wales

    Gadget
     
  11. Mark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    >"What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    >than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring up
    >to plead to come & pick me up, for example.

    Carry a multitool; allen keys or spanners for everything on the bike, chaintool, tyre boot,
    something you can adjust spokes with. If you ride at night, have two _entirely independent_ lighting
    systems front and rear, and carry spare batteries or bulbs as appropriate.

    Know where the railway stations closest to your route are.

    You may have to limp in once a year, but everyone's commute goes wrong once a year...
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  12. Sam Salt

    Sam Salt Guest

    I joined the ETA scheme via the CTC.Have not used them but there doesn,t seem to be any ' small
    print ' except that they don't cover punctures.Who exactly comes out or how long you would have to
    wait I don't know but just knowing someone was on their way would do for me.

    Sam Salt

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My long & arduous trek into work is enjoyable but lurking at the back of my mind is the question
    > "What are you going to do if something goes wrong?" Punctures I can fix, but anything more serious
    > than that means I end up without a paddle within a certain creek. I don't have anyone I can ring
    > up to plead to come & pick me up, for example.
    >
    > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?
    >
    > Ta
    >
    > Mark
    >
    >

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.478 / Virus Database: 275 - Release Date: 06/05/2003
     
  13. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On 08 May 2003 18:11:01 +0100 (BST), David Damerell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > You may have to limp in once a year, but everyone's commute goes wrong once a year...

    I've been lucky so far then. I've only limped home once and that was a puncture I decided a half
    mile walk home, a beer and then fix it. was preferable to changing the tube at the roadside

    Regards,

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  14. Carol Hague

    Carol Hague Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mark wrote:

    > > Just wondered how other people cater for such emergencies. Is there anything else I can do?
    >
    > You could consider joining the ETA, they offer a bicycle recovery scheme. Unfortunately, they
    > don't send out Michael Palin to repair your bike in situ but they will get you to the nearest bike
    > repair shop---though I expect there's some small print involved.

    You have to be more than 5 miles from home when you break down IIRC. But if there's no repair
    facilities available (e.g. it's Sunday and everywhere's shut) they'll take you home. At least
    they did with Rob when his lights failed on the last leg of his ride from London to Taunton a few
    years back.

    --
    Carol Hague "The bicycle is the product of pure reason applied to motion."
    - Angela Carter, "The Lady of the House of Love"
     
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