Re: Problem with new Shimano Cassette sticky freewheel action

  • Thread starter Phil, Squid-in-Training
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Phil, Squid-in-Training

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"Wayne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:1115032251.11413.8.camel@localhost...
> Hi,
> I recently overhauled the drive train on my bike, fitting a new Shimano
> Cassette, New Chain and new chain rings. Sometimes when I stop pedalling
> the the ratchet or freewheel doesn't immediately work on the cassette so
> the chain goes slack between the top of the cassette and the chain ring
> to the point it lands on the wheel stay, the chain on the underside
> eventually becomes so short that the freewheel kicks in and starts
> revolving properly. I've ridden about 80 odd miles now hoping it would
> free up but it hasn't. Is it possible that I've overtightened the
> locking ring on the cassette or am I just unlucky and have a duff one?
>
> It's a Shimano 9sp Deore cassette.


Hey Wayne,
Does this only happen on the smallest cogs of the cassette? The inertia of
a heavy cassette will keep it rotating if you're pedaling a high cadence and
suddenly stop, and the rear derailleur cage doesn't have enough tension to
resist that inertia.

An overtightened lockring can't cause this issue... all that is supposed to
be rigid anyways. The freehub on the inner diameter of the cassette is what
makes it all work.

If it's "sticky" sticky though, Peter's suggestion's the way to go.

--
Phil, Squid-in-Training
 
Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> "Wayne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:1115032251.11413.8.camel@localhost...
> > Hi,
> > I recently overhauled the drive train on my bike, fitting a new

Shimano
> > Cassette, New Chain and new chain rings. Sometimes when I stop

pedalling
> > the the ratchet or freewheel doesn't immediately work on the

cassette so
> > the chain goes slack between the top of the cassette and the chain

ring
> > to the point it lands on the wheel stay, the chain on the underside
> > eventually becomes so short that the freewheel kicks in and starts
> > revolving properly. I've ridden about 80 odd miles now hoping it

would
> > free up but it hasn't. Is it possible that I've overtightened the
> > locking ring on the cassette or am I just unlucky and have a duff

one?
> >
> > It's a Shimano 9sp Deore cassette.

>
> Hey Wayne,
> Does this only happen on the smallest cogs of the cassette? The

inertia of
> a heavy cassette will keep it rotating if you're pedaling a high

cadence and
> suddenly stop, and the rear derailleur cage doesn't have enough

tension to
> resist that inertia.
>
> An overtightened lockring can't cause this issue... all that is

supposed to
> be rigid anyways. The freehub on the inner diameter of the cassette

is what
> makes it all work.
>
> If it's "sticky" sticky though, Peter's suggestion's the way to go.
>
> --
> Phil, Squid-in-Training


I've been seeing this a lot lately on new bikes, I'd assumed it was
too-sticky grease in the freehub bearings and have been leaving it to
run in. Interesting that the OP has found it without changing the
freehub though. It also happened with a 11-34 7sp freewheel
(non-cassette) so I was assuming it to be Shimano grease combined with
a very small sprocket.

I hadn't considered the inertia thing, but ISTR you can reproduce it by
spinning the wheel up to speed in the 11-tooth sprocket, leaving it to
freewheel then backpedalling gently, which does suggest it's not
entirely inertia. I'll have a poke at one tomorrow and see if I can
deduce anything.

For the original problem, I think flushing the freehub grease out with
oil is indeed your best bet.
 
On Mon, 2005-05-02 at 16:35 +0000, Marvin wrote:
> Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> I've been seeing this a lot lately on new bikes, I'd assumed it was
> too-sticky grease in the freehub bearings and have been leaving it to
> run in. Interesting that the OP has found it without changing the
> freehub though. It also happened with a 11-34 7sp freewheel
> (non-cassette) so I was assuming it to be Shimano grease combined with
> a very small sprocket.
>
> I hadn't considered the inertia thing, but ISTR you can reproduce it by
> spinning the wheel up to speed in the 11-tooth sprocket, leaving it to
> freewheel then backpedalling gently, which does suggest it's not
> entirely inertia. I'll have a poke at one tomorrow and see if I can
> deduce anything.
>
> For the original problem, I think flushing the freehub grease out with
> oil is indeed your best bet.


Thanks for all the replies, I'll check the plastic plate first then move
onto this solution.

Regards
Wayne.
 

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