recommend: solid road/touring bike under $1000

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by raciere, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. raciere

    raciere Guest

    i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!

    my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?

    thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    > towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    > ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    > along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    > too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    > stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    > the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >
    > my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?


    Fuji Touring, approx $800 at an LBS, maybe a little less. STI shifters,
    27-speed, 11/32 cassette and 52/42/30 crankset for those steep hills,
    32mm tires for rough roads and smooth dirt/gravel. Sturdy, somewhat
    heavy but very tough and stable steel frame. For riding in the great
    northwest's wet weather, it also has eyelets for fenders, along with
    plenty of clearance for them, even with the big tires. I got one last
    fall and love it.

    If you take off the rack (it comes with one) and put on smaller, high
    pressure tires, it's got pretty reasonable performance if you don't need
    the lightest possible weight. At that price, you could even get some
    higher-performance wheels to save even more weight and aerodynamics and
    still stay under your $1000 budget.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 7 Jul 2004 12:35:28 -0700, [email protected] (raciere) wrote:
    >i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    >road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning


    Users of this newsfroup report much satisfaction with Fuji Touring
    and Jamis Aurora.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On 7 Jul 2004 12:35:28 -0700, [email protected] (raciere) wrote:
    > >i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > >road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning

    >
    > Users of this newsfroup report much satisfaction with Fuji Touring
    > and Jamis Aurora.


    Also, Bianchi's Volpe is another very similar model, at $849 list. It
    has a suspension seatpost, but no rear rack.


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  5. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 7 Jul 2004 12:35:28 -0700, [email protected] (raciere) wrote:

    >i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    >road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    >towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    >ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    >along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    >too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    >stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    >the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >
    >my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >
    >thanks.


    Among other suggestions-

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete
     
  6. Jamis Aurora.

    I'm a very very satisfied rider; I picked one up on clearance for US$
    450, and have been very satisfied since.

    -Luigi
     
  7. MJR

    MJR Guest

    K2 Mach 3.0

    20.9 lbs, Richey and 105 components.

    "raciere" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    > towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    > ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    > along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    > too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    > stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    > the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >
    > my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >
    > thanks.
     
  8. Stuart Black

    Stuart Black Guest

    [email protected] (raciere) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    > towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    > ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    > along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    > too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    > stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    > the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >
    > my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >
    > thanks.


    Cannondale T800. I bought one last summer and have been very
    impressed. It's slightly above your budget but you may be able to
    find one on clearance at REI. I used it for loaded touring on the
    Lewis and Clark trail and it held up to everything I could throw at it
    even with a full touring load.

    Stuart Black
     
  9. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] (raciere) wrote:
    >
    > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc...


    Trust me, you want one that's hollow. They're much lighter, and
    almost as strong. ;^D

    > i'm leaning
    > towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    > ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    > along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    > too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    > stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    > the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >
    > my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?


    You sound like a great candidate for a Surly Cross-Check. It's sort
    of a cyclocross bike, sort of a touring bike, but with tire/fender
    clearance that's unusual for either kind of bike. So you can run
    anything from 700x23 rubber bands to 700x47 tires with fenders, and
    thereby adjust the ride height and quality to whatever suits you best.
    It's about the most versatile thing available that matches both your
    mission profile and your price limit.

    http://www.surlybikes.com/bikes.html
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    The Cross-Check is available to almost every single bike shop in the
    USA. If you live in Seattle as you seem to suggest, I recommend
    buying it (or any other similar bike) from The Counterbalance Bicycles
    at 2 West Roy St. in Lower Queen Anne. Those guys serve largely the
    cycle messenger community, whose bike wants and budgets seem to
    correspond somewhat to your own.

    Chalo Colina
     
  10. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    David Kerber wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] says...
    >
    >>i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    >>road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    >>towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    >>ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    >>along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    >>too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    >>stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    >>the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >>
    >>my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >>

    >
    >Fuji Touring, approx $800 at an LBS, maybe a little less. STI shifters,
    >27-speed, 11/32 cassette and 52/42/30 crankset for those steep hills,
    >32mm tires for rough roads and smooth dirt/gravel. Sturdy, somewhat
    >heavy but very tough and stable steel frame. For riding in the great
    >northwest's wet weather, it also has eyelets for fenders, along with
    >plenty of clearance for them, even with the big tires. I got one last
    >fall and love it.
    >
    >If you take off the rack (it comes with one) and put on smaller, high
    >pressure tires, it's got pretty reasonable performance if you don't need
    >the lightest possible weight. At that price, you could even get some
    >higher-performance wheels to save even more weight and aerodynamics and
    >still stay under your $1000 budget.
    >

    I second the Fuji, tho it's not perfect. I've had mine for a few
    months, ride (commute) daily. Had broken spokes on the rear. Bike shop
    is going to change the rear spokes for best quality DT spokes for a mere
    $12.00 CAD. A great bit of customer service!
    I did change the Hutchinson Globe Trotter tires for Continental Top
    Touring 2000 , same size 700 x 32, but makes the bike feel like a
    different bike! I love them.
    Otherwise, saddle is a good fit for me, frame is strong all steel,
    shifts like a dream, rolls fast and smooth, and very important, the ride
    is stable as all get out. Many road bikes are twitchy and kind of
    skittery on hard curves and turns. The Fuji is easy and stable. It is
    very easy to push with just one hand on the back of the seat, and easy
    to ride no hands. I know this is due to the geometry, but that is not a
    subject I am well acquainted with, I just know how it feels.
    The paint job looks quality and not flashy as well (dark green with gold
    flecks and sand bands), which suits me. I think a touring machine
    should be less flash than a racer.
    Whatever you ride, have a ball! Summer is here, so get out there.
    Best, Bernie
     
  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "raciere" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc...


    I recently bought a flat bar road bike from Ibex Bicycles. It's the Corrida
    CT 2.2, and the price was $299. Yes, there's a flat bar, but the frame has
    rack and fender eyelets, room for up to a 700x32 tire, and a triple
    crankset. I was pleasantly surprised by the quality.

    http://www.ibexbikes.com
     
  12. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > David Kerber wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >[email protected] says...
    > >
    > >>i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > >>road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    > >>towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    > >>ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    > >>along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    > >>too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    > >>stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    > >>the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    > >>
    > >>my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    > >>

    > >
    > >Fuji Touring, approx $800 at an LBS, maybe a little less. STI shifters,
    > >27-speed, 11/32 cassette and 52/42/30 crankset for those steep hills,
    > >32mm tires for rough roads and smooth dirt/gravel. Sturdy, somewhat
    > >heavy but very tough and stable steel frame. For riding in the great
    > >northwest's wet weather, it also has eyelets for fenders, along with
    > >plenty of clearance for them, even with the big tires. I got one last
    > >fall and love it.
    > >
    > >If you take off the rack (it comes with one) and put on smaller, high
    > >pressure tires, it's got pretty reasonable performance if you don't need
    > >the lightest possible weight. At that price, you could even get some
    > >higher-performance wheels to save even more weight and aerodynamics and
    > >still stay under your $1000 budget.
    > >

    > I second the Fuji, tho it's not perfect. I've had mine for a few
    > months, ride (commute) daily. Had broken spokes on the rear. Bike shop
    > is going to change the rear spokes for best quality DT spokes for a mere
    > $12.00 CAD. A great bit of customer service!


    I had the wheels tensioned on mine soon after I bought it because they
    went out of true within a month, but they've been bullet-proof since
    then. I don't know if Fuji or somebody else assembled the wheels, but
    whomever it was left the spokes too loose. Once that was fixed, they've
    been great.

    .....

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  13. busterb

    busterb Guest

    [email protected] (Chalo) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > You sound like a great candidate for a Surly Cross-Check. It's sort
    > of a cyclocross bike, sort of a touring bike, but with tire/fender
    > clearance that's unusual for either kind of bike. So you can run
    > anything from 700x23 rubber bands to 700x47 tires with fenders, and
    > thereby adjust the ride height and quality to whatever suits you best.
    > It's about the most versatile thing available that matches both your
    > mission profile and your price limit.
    >
    > http://www.surlybikes.com/bikes.html
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete
    >
    > The Cross-Check is available to almost every single bike shop in the
    > USA. If you live in Seattle as you seem to suggest, I recommend
    > buying it (or any other similar bike) from The Counterbalance Bicycles
    > at 2 West Roy St. in Lower Queen Anne. Those guys serve largely the
    > cycle messenger community, whose bike wants and budgets seem to
    > correspond somewhat to your own.
    >
    > Chalo Colina


    I too would recommend a cyclocross bike for your riding. Touring
    bikes are generally heavier. The Cannondale xr800 I recently bought
    has rack eyelets front and rear, excellent tire clearance and without
    rear rack and bags is fairly light. A cross bike is all you'll need
    if you buy an extra set of wheels
     
  14. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    David Kerber wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >says...
    >
    >>David Kerber wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>[email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>>>i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    >>>>road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    >>>>towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    >>>>ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    >>>>along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    >>>>too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    >>>>stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    >>>>the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >>>>
    >>>>my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >>>>
    >>>Fuji Touring, approx $800 at an LBS, maybe a little less. STI shifters,
    >>>27-speed, 11/32 cassette and 52/42/30 crankset for those steep hills,
    >>>32mm tires for rough roads and smooth dirt/gravel. Sturdy, somewhat
    >>>heavy but very tough and stable steel frame. For riding in the great
    >>>northwest's wet weather, it also has eyelets for fenders, along with
    >>>plenty of clearance for them, even with the big tires. I got one last
    >>>fall and love it.
    >>>
    >>>If you take off the rack (it comes with one) and put on smaller, high
    >>>pressure tires, it's got pretty reasonable performance if you don't need
    >>>the lightest possible weight. At that price, you could even get some
    >>>higher-performance wheels to save even more weight and aerodynamics and
    >>>still stay under your $1000 budget.
    >>>

    >>I second the Fuji, tho it's not perfect. I've had mine for a few
    >>months, ride (commute) daily. Had broken spokes on the rear. Bike shop
    >>is going to change the rear spokes for best quality DT spokes for a mere
    >>$12.00 CAD. A great bit of customer service!
    >>

    >
    >I had the wheels tensioned on mine soon after I bought it because they
    >went out of true within a month, but they've been bullet-proof since
    >then. I don't know if Fuji or somebody else assembled the wheels, but
    >whomever it was left the spokes too loose. Once that was fixed, they've
    >been great.
    >
    >..
    >

    Well, I like the rims. I mean, they look like quality product. When
    the bike shop mech showed me the difference between the stock spokes and
    DT spokes, I was impressed with the difference. What's happened is, the
    spokes don't acutally break. The mushroom shaped head that sits in the
    hub flange has come off a few times.

    I don't think this will happen with the DT spokes. Let me know if you
    have issues with your bike? Did I mention I changed tires to
    Continental Top Touring 2000's? The difference was so dramatic it was
    like climbing onto a different bike. I love them. Will keep the
    Hutchinson Globe Trotter survivor for emergency back up.

    Best, Bernie
     
  15. AMG

    AMG Guest

    >>>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>>[email protected] says...
    >>>>
    >>>>>i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    >>>>>road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc... i'm leaning
    >>>>>towards a touring bike, as the riding i want to do combines an
    >>>>>ocassional trail (flat dirt trails) and the ocassional steep hill,
    >>>>>along with curbs, etc... but most of the riding will be roads. and,
    >>>>>too, i want to be able to pull my daughter in a bike
    >>>>>stroller/trailer... and pure road bikes just seem a bit frail for all
    >>>>>the above... and hybrids, well, i dont like them much. so.. touring!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>my budget requires that i stay under 1K. thoughts?
    >>>>>


    One more option: The Trek 520, a classic touring bike. These list for
    $1100, but can often be found for $100 less if you shop around. It is
    steel, and built for "loaded touring," meaning it is not frail. OTOH, it
    does not weigh a ton, either. Has many-spoked wheels (and stainless steel
    spokes), good quality components generally (road bike front + MTB back on
    the drive train), and all the fittings you'd want, for panniers, water
    bottles, etc. I bought one about 4 months ago and have been happy with it
    (no affiliation to Trek or any bike shop!)

    One caveat: This model seems to change very little from year to year
    (including the color), so dealers may be tempted to sell you an
    earlier-year model for the current price. If this matters to you, know the
    specs when you walk in the shop, because there may be no other way to
    tell the difference. OTOH, the fact that the design is relatively stable
    suggests that Trek has tweaked it enough over the years to have arrived at
    a good design point, and a model that is actually a year or two old is not
    that different from the true latest issue. Again, check those specs!

    Good luck!

    AMG
     
  16. raciere

    raciere Guest

    ok, to really throw a wrench into my plans... i did a ton of research
    and decided that a bianchi axis was the best bike for my desires (tho
    a few hundred above budget). however, i was recently *given* a
    poccianti titanium italian frame, hand made in some small shop in
    florence. it it beautiful, however it needs some work. both the top
    tube and the down tube have significant impact dents... such that they
    may need cutting out & replacing. also, 1 of the chain stays is bent.
    must of been in a car crash, not sure of the history. everything else
    on the frame looks solid... all of the welds, joints, etc....

    I am not at all familiar with this brand of frame, with titanium frame
    repair, nor do I have any idea what repair costs may be, or if this is
    even a good frame to build a cyclocross bike ... totally blind here.
    don't know if i should just get the bianchi, or dive into building a
    bike w/ this frame... as it is titanium and i hear ti will last a
    lifetime.

    so a few questions:

    = how expensive is ti frame repair?

    = to build a cyclocross, what good quality but affordable components
    would you recommend with this frame (wanting a triple + a 11/32T
    cassette?)... I've been looking at the campy centaur, but I don't
    think I can do a 11/32T cassette... what else is possible?

    = and has ANYONE ever heard of a "sesto fiorentino poccianti"
    titanium frame?

    oh, lastly... if I go for it and build this bike, who sells (online)
    the best priced new and used component groups?

    clearly I am a novice, and I will be grateful for any recommends or
    input.

    +s


    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "raciere" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > i am fairly new to riding, and am looking for a fast, solid
    > > road/touring bike for seattle hills, roads, etc...

    >
    > I recently bought a flat bar road bike from Ibex Bicycles. It's the Corrida
    > CT 2.2, and the price was $299. Yes, there's a flat bar, but the frame has
    > rack and fender eyelets, room for up to a 700x32 tire, and a triple
    > crankset. I was pleasantly surprised by the quality.
    >
    > http://www.ibexbikes.com
     
  17. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 10 Jul 2004 21:56:16 -0700, [email protected] (raciere) wrote:


    >don't know if i should just get the bianchi, or dive into building a
    >bike w/ this frame... as it is titanium and i hear ti will last a
    >lifetime.
    >


    Heh..... I find this funny. Here's a frame that sounds like it was run
    over by a car, three tubes dented or bent, and you're thinking that
    because it is titanium it will last a lifetime?? Sure-- take to an
    auto junk yard and have it smashed into a small cube, drill out a
    hollow, and they can bury your ashes in it :)

    Nothing personal. I hope you can see the humor of someone describing a
    smashed up bike and then going, 'But it will last forever!'


    >so a few questions:
    >
    >= how expensive is ti frame repair?
    >


    Probably more expensive than it's worth?

    >= to build a cyclocross, what good quality but affordable components
    >would you recommend with this frame (wanting a triple + a 11/32T
    >cassette?)... I've been looking at the campy centaur, but I don't
    >think I can do a 11/32T cassette... what else is possible?
    >


    One idea-

    http://www.hubbub.com/ergoleverswshim9.htm


    >= and has ANYONE ever heard of a "sesto fiorentino poccianti"
    >titanium frame?
    >
    >oh, lastly... if I go for it and build this bike, who sells (online)
    >the best priced new and used component groups?
    >


    Buying a bike with parts is almost always cheaper than buying/having a
    frame and buying parts to put on it. And many bike shops will charge
    you a lot to assemble/fix a bike from parts you've collected mail
    order. Be sure to look carefully at the full costs here.

    >clearly I am a novice, and I will be grateful for any recommends or
    >input.
    >
    >+s
    >


    As a novice, do you think that you are capable of building up a bike
    from parts? Do you know enough to order the right parts and deal with
    the little nuances that can come up? Like using anti-seize on titanium
    parts?

    I think that you will be much better off buying either a complete
    bike, or working with a local shop to get the parts to flesh out a
    used one. It's much easier to learn on an existing bike, and shops are
    much more willing to help you and share what they know when you are a
    customer.
     
  18. On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 21:56:16 -0700, raciere wrote:

    > ok, to really throw a wrench into my plans... i did a ton of research
    > and decided that a bianchi axis was the best bike for my desires (tho
    > a few hundred above budget). however, i was recently *given* a
    > poccianti titanium italian frame, hand made in some small shop in
    > florence. it it beautiful, however it needs some work. both the top
    > tube and the down tube have significant impact dents... such that they
    > may need cutting out & replacing. also, 1 of the chain stays is bent.
    > must of been in a car crash, not sure of the history. everything else
    > on the frame looks solid... all of the welds, joints, etc....
    >


    You can buy a titanium frame for $600. Custom frames can be very, very
    hard to fix, and you may be far better off buying a complete package.

    Seems that nowadays you can buy a complete bike, with wheels, tires, etc
    for what you pay if you just buy the group.

    So, I would not get hung up on fixing the frame. It sounds pretty much
    trashed. 2 out of 3 main tubes are damaged, as is one of the chainstays.
    The whole frame is probably racked.

    Me, I'm partial to the old Raleigh Technium frames for touring. Great
    touring geometry.

    --Kamus
     
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