Repairing Continental Olympic Tubular Tires

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by MJG, Jun 28, 2004.

  1. MJG

    MJG New Member

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    I managed to flat two of the most expensive tires known to mankind (hand-me-downs from a pro): 19mm Continental Olympics. Thorns did me in. Does anyone know if they can be repaired? The holes in the inner tubing are microscopic, but enough that they don't hold air. I saw in VN that tirealert.com does sewup repair, but it seems a bit dramatic...ripping apart the whole seam and replacing the base tape? Is there a patch method? Will any of these methods work with these stupid-light tires?

    MJ
     
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  2. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    MJG asks anonymously:

    > I managed to flat two of the most expensive tires known to
    > mankind (hand-me-downs from a pro): 19mm Continental
    > Olympics. Thorns did me in. Does anyone know if they can
    > be repaired? The holes in the inner tubing are
    > microscopic, but enough that they don't hold air. I saw in
    > VN that tirealert.com does sewup repair, but it seems a
    > bit dramatic...ripping apart the whole seam and replacing
    > the base tape? Is there a patch method? Will any of these
    > methods work with these stupid-light tires?

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html
    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.28.html

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  3. Jp

    Jp Guest

    MJG <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I managed to flat two of the most expensive tires known
    > to mankind
    (hand-me-downs from a pro): 19mm Continental Olympics.
    Thorns did me
    in. Does anyone know if they can be repaired? The holes in
    the inner tubing are microscopic, but enough that they
    don't hold air. I saw in VN that tirealert.com does
    sewup repair, but it seems a bit dramatic...ripping
    apart the whole seam and replacing the base tape? Is
    there a patch method? Will any of these methods work
    with these stupid-light tires?

    Before I went tearing into those tires I would try Tufo
    sealant. It has worked for me to repair a couple of good
    tires. If the holes are as small as you say, I would expect
    that it will do the job for you. Mere coincidence or not,
    those tires have not flatted since then, either.

    JP
     
  4. MJG-<< Thorns did me in. Does anyone know if they can be
    repaired? The holes in the inner tubing are microscopic, but
    enough that they don't hold air. I saw in VN that
    tirealert.com does sewup repair, but it seems a bit
    dramatic...ripping apart >><BR><BR>

    Find the hole in water, pull the base tape off there, cut
    the stitches, pull a little of the tube out, patch, stuff
    back in and sew up, reglue the base tape with Fastac. I use
    waxed dental floss and a chain or 'baseball' stitch.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Bill K.

    Bill K. Guest

    Normally I would say that if you can't repair sew ups, you
    shouldn't be riding them. But I won't.
    #1....Don't put any goop into a tire that good.
    #2....Excuse me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Olympic a
    # track tire.
    #3....TireAlert.com does a fine job. About a month ago, I
    # had a CX
    that had failed at the valve. I normally fix them myself,
    but this one needed a new tube. They did an excellent job,
    including the base tape. A few years ago, they did a crappy
    job of base tape glueing. Big improvement. They use a butyl
    tube in all cases, and the tube doesn't have a removeable
    valve core.
     
  6. Jp

    Jp Guest

    [email protected] (Bill K.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Normally I would say that if you can't repair sew ups, you
    > shouldn't be riding them. But I won't.
    > #1....Don't put any goop into a tire that good.

    Why? Have you ever tried it? I have repaired a lot of
    tubulars in my day, and I can tell you that in general
    Tufo is a less intrusive way to do it. In this particular
    case, with a small puncture it is almost certain to work
    and may even provide protection against future flats. It
    leaves the structure of the tire completely intact, and I
    have yet to discover any downside to it. With a tubular it
    is easily possible to develop a slow leak where you can
    tear out half the stitching trying to find the leak,
    because the air is escaping around the valve stem instead
    of the point of the puncture.

    The only thing worse than putting goop in a tire that good
    is not putting goop in a tire that good.

    JP
     
  7. Bill K.

    Bill K. Guest

    I've used the TUFO goop on a TUFO tire, and wasn't
    completly satisfied. The tire was not balanced after I did
    it, and still lost air slowly. The TUFO goop is a last
    resort for a tire that you can't repair any other way. If
    you're not able to repair a tubie, you'd be better off
    sending it in to tire alert.
     
  8. Jp

    Jp Guest

    [email protected] (Bill K.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've used the TUFO goop on a TUFO tire, and wasn't
    > completly satisfied. The tire was not balanced after I did
    > it, and still lost air slowly.

    The latex-tubed tires I repaired with Tufo actually lost air
    *less* slowly with the Tufo than they did before the flat,
    although they still need a daily topping up. And since
    bicycle wheel/tube/tire systems are not balanced before you
    add Tufo, I would not expect them to be balanced afterwards.
    However, if you somehow noticed the difference you probably
    used too much. I typically use 2 hypodermics (without the
    needle) worth, which I believe equates to about 10cc.

    > The TUFO goop is a last resort for a tire that you can't
    > repair any other way.

    No, it's a first resort- minimally invasive surgery.

    > If you're not able to repair a tubie, you'd be better off
    > sending it in to tire alert.

    (Obviously not addressed to me personally since I have
    already stated that I have repaired many tubular tires over
    the years using the traditional approach.)If you don't mind
    a butyl tube with a non-extractable valve core. That kind of
    repair will permanently resolve the question of whether you
    will ever use Tufo in the future on that tire or not, since
    you have to remove the valve core to use Tufo (since ripping
    open the tire to inject it through a hole in the tube kinda
    defeats the purpose). And since I get fewer flats with latex
    tubes I wouldn't recommend replacing them with butyl. (I
    admit that this may be the result of the fact that better
    tires tend to have latex tubes; however, lacking definitive
    evidence one way or the other I will stick with and
    recommend latex.)

    JP
     
  9. Bill K.

    Bill K. Guest

    "I admit
    > that this may be the result of the fact that better tires
    > tend to have latex tubes; however, lacking definitive
    > evidence one way or the other I will stick with and
    > recommend latex.)"

    I'm really not sure why Conti puts a butyl tube in their
    Comps. You would think that they would try to save 30 grams
    and use a latex tube in their top of the line road tire. As
    I can only speak for myself, I would only use the Tufo goop
    on a Tufo tire, since that the only way to repair them.
    Normally on tubies, I'll just rip open two inches of
    stiching to repair them. I recomend tirealert for when the
    tube is ruined, or if you are afraid to open a tubie up. A
    Conti Olympic is not a good tire to learn tubie repair. I
    learned on Vittoria Criterium's and Conti Giro's. Cheap
    tires that you don't cry over,if you screw them up.
    Ps. Nowadays, I only race on tubies, so I don't get
    many flats.
     
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