Result of eating more beans

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Metroped, Dec 3, 2003.

  1. Metroped

    Metroped Guest

    To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this personal observation may be of
    interest...

    For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy
    'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped 12%
    without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.

    Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month I
    no longer had that 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.

    Bob
    --
    _______________________________
    Robert Brubaker, Director Metroped Inc.
    P.O. Box 7244 Alexandria, VA. 22307 Phone: 1-267-295-1035 E-Mail: [email protected]
    Internet: www.metroped.org
     
    Tags:


  2. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    MetroPed wrote:

    > To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this personal observation may be of
    > interest...
    >
    > For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    > diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy
    > 'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped
    > 12% without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.
    >
    > Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month I
    > no longer had that 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.

    Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    "oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    product called "Beano."

    If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.

    Pastorio
     
  3. Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also, very
    easy to cook.

    i

    In article <[email protected]>, MetroPed wrote:
    > To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this personal observation may be of
    > interest...
    >
    > For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    > diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy
    > 'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped
    > 12% without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.
    >
    > Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month I
    > no longer had that 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.
    >
    > Bob
     
  4. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    > "oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    > down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    > product called "Beano."
    >
    > If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    > sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.

    Not hard to believe at all! I eat beans every day, sometimes twice a day and have done so for most
    of my adult life. As a child, I ate the frequently, but not as frequently as I would have liked. The
    rest of the family did not like them as well as I did and they did have some problems with them.

    When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    cooking them. My Mom adds baking soda to her beans. She claims this gets rid of the gas. I did try
    this once and only got a foamy mess. I do not get gas from my beans. I don't get gas from canned
    beans either. Never have!

    But milk? All it takes is one glass and my stomach is in knots. Fruit is troublesome too. Raw
    cabbage or raw cauliflower eaten in any quantity does not work well for me, and the sugar alcohols
    are the worst.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  5. Andrew Kelly

    Andrew Kelly Guest

    Raffinose is the oligosaccharide found in beans, and intestinal micro flora in the large intestine
    can digest raffinose, which produce the enzymes needed. There are also other digestion resistant
    polysaccharides in beans.

    "Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > MetroPed wrote:
    >
    > > To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this
    personal
    > > observation may be of interest...
    > >
    > > For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    > > diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise
    have
    > > remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy 'low blood sugar'
    effect
    > > an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped
    12%
    > > without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of
    interest
    > > to some.
    > >
    > > Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month
    > > I no longer had that
    'bowel
    > > distress' problem folks associate with beans.
    >
    > Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    > "oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    > down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    > product called "Beano."
    >
    > If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    > sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >
    > Pastorio
     
  6. Mirek Fidler

    Mirek Fidler Guest

    > Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also, very
    > easy to cook.

    I must say, at third week of low-carbing, beans and oranges are the only food that I really
    miss so far.

    So I am happy I will be able to eat them again later :)

    Mirek
     
  7. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Thu, 4 Dec 2003 00:42:59 +0100 in article <[email protected]> "Mirek
    Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also, very
    >> easy to cook.
    >
    >I must say, at third week of low-carbing, beans and oranges are the only food that I really
    >miss so far.
    >
    What percentage (approximately) of carbs in beans are digestible? What are the best plant low-carb
    replacements for beans?
     
  8. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > "Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    >>"oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    >>down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    >>product called "Beano."
    >>
    >>If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    >>sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >
    >
    > Not hard to believe at all! I eat beans every day, sometimes twice a day and have done so for
    > most of my adult life. As a child, I ate the frequently, but not as frequently as I would have
    > liked. The rest of the family did not like them as well as I did and they did have some problems
    > with them.
    >
    > When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    > cooking them.

    There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble. Nothing in the chemistry of
    the beans changes because of the soak or the water changes.

    Russ Parsons did a whole bunch of experiments that he documented about this subject. No need to soak
    at all. Cook from dry, it just takes a bit longer.

    > My Mom adds baking soda to her beans. She claims this gets rid of the gas.

    She's wrong.

    > I did try this once and only got a foamy mess. I do not get gas from my beans. I don't get gas
    > from canned beans either. Never have!
    >
    > But milk? All it takes is one glass and my stomach is in knots. Fruit is troublesome too. Raw
    > cabbage or raw cauliflower eaten in any quantity does not work well for me, and the sugar alcohols
    > are the worst.

    Well, you know what to avoid. If not for yourself, at least for those around you.

    Pastorio
     
  9. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Thu, 04 Dec 2003 01:44:29 +0200 in article <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thu, 4 Dec 2003 00:42:59 +0100 in article <[email protected]> "Mirek
    >Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also, very
    >>> easy to cook.
    >>
    >>I must say, at third week of low-carbing, beans and oranges are the only food that I really
    >>miss so far.
    >>
    >What percentage (approximately) of carbs in beans are digestible? What are the best plant low-carb
    >replacements for beans?

    Another question: what about soy beans in low-carb diet? Unlike other beans soy beans have a higher
    amount of proteins than carbs. A serving of 200 g of boiled mature soy beans have 33 g protein and
    20 g of carbs.
     
  10. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    ANdrew Kelly wrote:

    > Raffinose is the oligosaccharide found in beans, and intestinal micro flora in the large intestine
    > can digest raffinose, which produce the enzymes needed.

    Yes. And the metabilization of the oligosaccharides in our large intestine by our resident bacteria
    creates gases as byproducts. But you're right, I didn't spell it out very clearly.

    > There are also other digestion-resistant polysaccharides in beans.

    And a pleasure they are, too.

    Pastorio

    > "Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> MetroPed wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this
    > > personal observation may be of interest...
    >>>
    >>>For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    >>>diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise
    > > have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy 'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2
    > > after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped 12% without 'dieting'. As I said this
    > > is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.
    >>>
    >>>Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month
    >>>I no longer had that
    > > 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.
    >>
    >>Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    >>"oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    >>down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    >>product called "Beano."
    >>
    >>If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    >>sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >>
    >>Pastorio
    >>
    >
     
  11. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    In sci.med.nutrition Bob Pastorio <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    > MetroPed wrote:

    >> To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this personal observation may be of
    >> interest...
    >>
    >> For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    >> diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy
    >> 'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped
    >> 12% without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.
    >>
    >> Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month
    >> I no longer had that 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.
    >
    > Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    > "oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    > down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    > product called "Beano."
    >
    > If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    > sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.

    Cooking reduces the oligosaccharide content, though - e.g.:

    http://ift.confex.com/ift/2001/techprogram/paper_8808.htm
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
     
  12. Ropingirl

    Ropingirl Guest

    Mirek ~

    I have to agree with you that two of my favorite foods I am missing with low carb are beans and
    oranges...eaten seperately of course!

    Also to address the "gas" issue with beans. The only beans I eat are pinto beans and I've eaten them
    all of my life on an almost daily basis and find that for the most part I don't have gas. Though I
    have to admit once in a while I wouldn't want to be in the same isle in the grocery store with me
    after a good ole bowl of beans, green chile and cheese! Haha!

    "Mirek Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also, very
    > > easy to cook.
    >
    > I must say, at third week of low-carbing, beans and oranges are the only food that I really
    > miss so far.
    >
    > So I am happy I will be able to eat them again later :)
    >
    > Mirek
    >
    >

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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  13. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    In sci.med.nutrition Bob Pastorio <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >> "Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >>>Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    >>>"oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break
    >>>them down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using
    >>>the product called "Beano."
    >>>
    >>>If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    >>>sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >>
    >> Not hard to believe at all! I eat beans every day, sometimes twice a day and have done so for
    >> most of my adult life. As a child, I ate the frequently, but not as frequently as I would have
    >> liked. The rest of the family did not like them as well as I did and they did have some problems
    >> with them.
    >>
    >> When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    >> cooking them.
    >
    > There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble. Nothing in the chemistry
    > of the beans changes because of the soak or the water changes.

    Try drinking a *little* bit of the soak water to see how false this is.

    > Russ Parsons did a whole bunch of experiments that he documented about this subject. No need to
    > soak at all. Cook from dry, it just takes a bit longer.

    ``The main reasons for soaking dried beans is to soften and return moisture to them, and to break
    down the oligosaccharides (the indigestible sugars that cause gas).''

    - http://missvickie.com/howto/beans/howtosoak.html
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
     
  14. Mattlb

    Mattlb Guest

    Bob Pastorio wrote:

    > > When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    > > cooking them.
    >
    > There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble.

    Sure they are - in fact they are included in the group 'soluble fibre'.

    MattLB
     
  15. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    Tim Tyler wrote:

    > In sci.med.nutrition Bob Pastorio <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    >
    >> MetroPed wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>To whom it may concern, I realize this is very anecdotal but this personal observation may be of
    >>>interest...
    >>>
    >>>For about the last year I've significantly increased the percentage of 'beans and lentils' in my
    >>>diet. Overall calorie intake and exercise have remained the same. Noticed I don't get that drowsy
    >>>'low blood sugar' effect an hour or 2 after I've eaten. More importantly, my weight has dropped
    >>>12% without 'dieting'. As I said this is very anecdotal but may be of interest to some.
    >>>
    >>>Note 1: I'm boiling dry beans with no sugar added. Note 2: Also noticed that after about 2 month
    >>>I no longer had that 'bowel distress' problem folks associate with beans.
    >>
    >>Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    >>"oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break them
    >>down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using the
    >>product called "Beano."
    >>
    >>If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    >>sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >
    > Cooking reduces the oligosaccharide content, though - e.g.:
    >
    > http://ift.confex.com/ift/2001/techprogram/paper_8808.htm

    It may well reduce the level somewhat, but it certainly doesn't bring it anywhere near enough to
    discount the effects. But every little bit helps, right?

    "Some" ain't necessarily "enough."

    Pastorio
     
  16. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    Tim Tyler wrote:

    > In sci.med.nutrition Bob Pastorio <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    >
    >>Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Bob Pastorio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>>>Very interesting. Hard to believe. The music maker in beans is a family of compounds called
    >>>>"oligosaccharides" which we can't digest no matter how hard we try. We have no means to break
    >>>>them down to simpler sugars. No enzymes. The only way is to add them to our foods, as in using
    >>>>the product called "Beano."
    >>>>
    >>>>If you've found a way to do that, you're the first human in history to do so. Boiling beans with
    >>>>sugar is not a broadly-used way of cooking them.
    >>>
    >>>Not hard to believe at all! I eat beans every day, sometimes twice a day and have done so for
    >>>most of my adult life. As a child, I ate the frequently, but not as frequently as I would have
    >>>liked. The rest of the family did not like them as well as I did and they did have some problems
    >>>with them.
    >>>
    >>>When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    >>>cooking them.
    >>
    >>There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble. Nothing in the chemistry
    >>of the beans changes because of the soak or the water changes.
    >
    > Try drinking a *little* bit of the soak water to see how false this is.
    >
    >>Russ Parsons did a whole bunch of experiments that he documented about this subject. No need to
    >>soak at all. Cook from dry, it just takes a bit longer.
    >
    > ``The main reasons for soaking dried beans is to soften and return moisture to them, and to break
    > down the oligosaccharides (the indigestible sugars that cause gas).''
    >
    > - http://missvickie.com/howto/beans/howtosoak.html

    Miss Vickie says, "Beans are protein, and pound for pound they are equal to a good cut of meat, but
    cost only a few pennies. As stated above the longer you have to cook beans the more valuable protein
    will be destroyed and this can impact the nutritional needs of your family, especially if you do not
    serve protein in other forms to compensate."

    Whoever Miss Vickie is, she doesn't know much science. Read the rest of her page and see.

    Next.

    Pastorio
     
  17. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    MattLB wrote:

    > Bob Pastorio wrote:
    >
    >>>When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    >>>cooking them.
    >>
    >>There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble.
    >
    > Sure they are - in fact they are included in the group 'soluble fibre'.

    Matt, please go see what that means. It isn't what you think.

    Pastorio
     
  18. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    Bob Pastorio <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    > MattLB wrote:
    >> Bob Pastorio wrote:

    >>>>When I cook my beans from scratch, I soak them overnight, changing the water a few times before
    >>>>cooking them.
    >>>
    >>>There's no good reason to do that. The oligosaccharides aren't soluble.
    >>
    >> Sure they are - in fact they are included in the group 'soluble fibre'.
    >
    > Matt, please go see what that means. It isn't what you think.

    What does this mean:

    ``Rinsing beans will help. Luckily, oligosaccharides are water soluble, so
    rinsing the beans several times in fresh water helps in reducing gas.''

    - http://www.wisc.edu/foodsafety/assets/foodfacts_2001/foodfacts_feb_2001.pdf

    ...?
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
     
  19. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Ropingirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Mirek ~
    >
    > I have to agree with you that two of my favorite foods I am missing with low carb are beans and
    > oranges...eaten seperately of course!
    >
    > Also to address the "gas" issue with beans. The only beans I eat are pinto beans and I've eaten
    > them all of my life on an almost daily basis and find that for the most part I don't have gas.
    > Though I have to admit once in a while I wouldn't want to be in the same isle in the grocery store
    > with me after a good ole bowl of beans, green chile and cheese! Haha!
    >
    > "Mirek Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream. Also,
    > > > very easy to cook.
    > >
    > > I must say, at third week of low-carbing, beans and oranges are the only food that I really miss
    > > so far.
    > >
    > > So I am happy I will be able to eat them again later :)
    > >
    > > Mirek

    I added Black Beans "ranch style" to my diet as an occasional treat, they are also great as a
    substitute for flour when adding substance to a soup.
     
  20. Once upon a time, our fellow Ignoramus11065 rambled on about "Re: Result of eating more beans." Our
    champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

    >Beans have delightful taste if you mix them with something fatty, such as sour cream.

    You must think that this is a gourmet forum?

    Perhaps, if you were to concentrate?

    Ha, ... Hah, Ha!
     
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