running with a water bottle

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jac, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Jac

    Jac Guest

    I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.

    Thanks in advance John Clarke
     
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  2. David

    David Guest

    Get a Fuel Belt. I love mine... doesn't bounce at all. Aside from a little extra weight when the
    bottles are all full... you hardly even know you have it on.

    "JAC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    > shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    > difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance John Clarke
    >
    >
    --
    David Nova Scotia, Canada.
     
  3. Gateway

    Gateway Guest

    "JAC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    > shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    > difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance John Clarke

    I run with a bottle round my waist. The holder keeps the bottle at an angle. It feels comfortable
    enough and doesn't slosh around at all. It can be a bit awkward to get the bottle in & out of the
    holder but it's not too bad. I bought it in a running/cycling shop.

    I also have a small CamelBak which is also comfortable but I prefer the bottle even though it has
    much smaller capacity.
     
  4. >I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    >shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    >difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.

    I think your tiny pea-sized brain is sloshing around in your skull to ask such

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( . ) Rogers ass pre-Bill, ( 0 ) and Rogers ass post-Bill

    OO
     
  5. Roger 2k

    Roger 2k Guest

    JAC wrote in message ...
    >I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    >shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    >difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    >Thanks in advance John Clarke

    I have one of those belts where the bottle is "straight up" and I don't mind the "slosh around" at
    all. What I don't like is when it is full it bounces around.

    So what I do is carry it in my hand until I can drink part of it, then put it in the belt when it is
    about half full. It sloshes then, but it doesn't bounce as much.
     
  6. >I also have a small CamelBak

    Your physical description wasn't necassary.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( . ) Rogers ass pre-Bill, ( 0 ) and Rogers ass post-Bill

    OO
     
  7. Kelly Lee

    Kelly Lee Guest

    JAC wrote:
    > I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    > shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    > difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance John Clarke
    >
    >

    I run with a 6 bottle fuel belt, depending on how far I run I only take as many bottles as I need. I
    was worried about the extra weight and the bounce, but can't really tell any difference at all, well
    worth the money. Go to fuelbelt.com.

    Kelly Lee
     
  8. It seem the "Fuel belt" and the "Camel back" are the two solutions of choice. I don't have either as
    I don't like to carry my own, I stash mine on the route.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math

    "JAC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    > shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    > difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance John Clarke
     
  9. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    David wrote:
    > Get a Fuel Belt. I love mine... doesn't bounce at all. Aside from a little extra weight when the
    > bottles are all full... you hardly even know you have it on.

    I tried one once and found it annoying but that is me. Just a heads up, if you plan to use the FB in
    a race be prepared to spend a pile of time refilling those little baby bottles. And if the aid
    stations offer refill services don't be surprised if you get a nasty look. If it's only for a
    training run I'd opt for a few hundred eyedroppers on a velcro belt. :)

    Just an observation but in my last two races this spring where everyone carries fluid, I noticed
    only one Fuel Belt. That's about 600+ runners between the two.

    As a trail runner and racer I have seen just about every type and the answer is you have to see what
    works for you. I have a one and two bottle Ultimate Direction waist belt(UD has very wide belts to
    allow for a bounce less ride) and hardly know it there. Others prefer the "camel back" type with
    bladders. You need to experiment.

    --
    Caveat Lector "the further you go outside, the further you go inside" - B. McKibben Doug Freese
    [email protected]
     
  10. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > It seem the "Fuel belt" and the "Camel back" are the two solutions of choice.

    Not in my race experience - the FB is hardly seen.

    --
    Caveat Lector "the further you go outside, the further you go inside" - B. McKibben Doug Freese
    [email protected]
     
  11. > I stash mine
    > on the route.

    Some runners at the res in Holyoke do that too. I usually pee a bit into each one while they're
    gone. One day I was really horny, so you can guess what went into those bottles that time. Not too
    much so they'd taste it, just enough so they'll still drink it, but keep saying "What is that
    unusual flavor? I know I've tasted it before, i just can't remeber where." So stash away!

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( . ) Rogers ass pre-Bill, ( 0 ) and Rogers ass post-Bill

    OO
     
  12. >I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    >shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    >difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.

    Heck, I just get a 24-ounce bottle (bought it for a few bucks at Jamba Juice, it's pretty well
    designed, has a rubber ring around it for easy gripping) and carry that in my hand. But that's me --
    I suspect a belt around my waist would drive me nuts. Plus I'm cheap.

    I can get by with that for about 15 miles on a cool day without refilling.

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  13. Tom Schipper

    Tom Schipper Guest

    JAC <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    : shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    : difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.

    : Thanks in advance John Clarke

    The reason there are so many options out there is because different things work for different
    people. You have to be willing to spend a little or borrow some )belts generaly not devices like
    camel backs with the moth tube) and see what works for you. I generally use a waist belt with a
    single verticle bottle in the middle of my back. I also have a very small fanny pack that holds a
    bottle on either side of the pack and have used that on a few long longs where water would not be
    available. I have a camle back but hate it. Never tried the fule belt. When they first came out the
    developer was spammin rec.running. I sent them an e-mail explaining spammin was not appreciated at
    rec.running and they stopped even offed me a free fule belt but I didn't really want to take
    something from a spammer.

    Tom
     
  14. Dieshooter

    Dieshooter Guest

    Tom Schipper <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > JAC <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : I've seen a lot of different types and designs. Some are straight up, some slanted, some weird
    > : shaped bottles. I am interested in what you might suggest, and where to get it. Also, was it
    > : difficult to adapt to running with it. Does it slosh around. etc.
    >
    > : Thanks in advance John Clarke

    Before you got out and spend a bunch of money on a system or belt or pack or whatever, try carrying
    a 20-oz or 16-oz plastic bottle of water you get at the grocery store. On a 15-16 mile run, I've
    never had a problem just toting a Dansini water bottle. Once I got used to it, I hardly noticed it.
     
  15. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:
    >

    > As a trail runner and racer I have seen just about every type and the answer is you have to see
    > what works for you. I have a one and two bottle Ultimate Direction waist belt(UD has very wide
    > belts to allow for a bounce less ride) and hardly know it there.

    FWIW, in the two 2-bottle ones I have, one has single 2 inch belt, and the other two 1 inch belts
    that hook into the same buckle. The single 2 inch belt works better for me than the effectively
    wider double 1-inch belts. While theoretically more stable, I find it has to ride too high
    (=affecting breathing) to be stable. Single bottle has 1.5 inch belt and works fine.

    To the OP, try one of the belt types on in the store - preferably with gear if it has space or
    similar clothes to what you run in. They ride very differently when carrying fluid / gear, and I
    found mine slipped more when in summer gear compared to winter.

    More importantly, consider how much fluid and/or gear you may need with you - is one or two 20-oz
    bottles enough or do you need the larger capacity of a fluid bladder like camelbak. I started with a
    single water bottle type, but as I got more adventurous and had an assortment of things happen, I
    needed more fluid, food, and emergency gear (trail runner in Alaska). Our trail races don't have aid
    stations and some have required gear, so I just train the way I would be racing. That's probably not
    going to be an issue for you, but it's a reason many people use the backpack CamelBak style. 20-oz
    of fluid just doesn't get us very far.

    Other things that might be a consideration is the temperatures involved (hot or cold=freezing
    fluid), flow rate out the nozzle (some systems are harder to get fluid out of than others - Camelbak
    delivers more fluid per effort than my UD bottles), hands-free drinking and being able to keep eyes
    on trail, mouth opening (can you fit ice cubes in it), and how easy is it to get the bottle out of
    holder (UD bottles have loops to facilitate this).

    Bottles may have a pleasant rhythmic swish, and you may hear interesting sounds if your fluid starts
    freezing (swish changes to clunk). Hydration bladders have less swish if you remove the air first.

    My weapon of choice is my Camelbak cloudwalker, but do use the 1- and 2-bottle (usually with 1-1.5
    bottles plus gear) UD varieties (solitaire 4s, gemini 4s, with the "s" meaning it has extra
    insulation) for shorter runs.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  16. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    Dot wrote:

    > FWIW, in the two 2-bottle ones I have, one has single 2 inch belt, and the other two 1 inch belts
    > that hook into the same buckle.

    I hope we are measuring different places. When I'm talking about the width it's across the back
    where the bottle is secured. My one bottle belt it is 7 inches and my 2 bottle it is 8.

    > inch belt works better for me than the effectively wider double 1-inch belts. While theoretically
    > more stable, I find it has to ride too high (=affecting breathing) to be stable.

    What do you feel is being compressed to affect breathing. I know we are built differently ;) but I'd
    have to have someone else with two free hands pull it to effect my breathing.

    --
    Caveat Lector "the further you go outside, the further you go inside" - B. McKibben Doug Freese
    [email protected]
     
  17. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:
    >
    > Dot wrote:
    >
    > > FWIW, in the two 2-bottle ones I have, one has single 2 inch belt, and the other two 1 inch
    > > belts that hook into the same buckle.
    >
    > I hope we are measuring different places.

    Duh, yep!

    When I'm talking
    > about the width it's across the back where the bottle is secured. My one bottle belt it is 7
    > inches and my 2 bottle it is 8.

    My single starts at 8 and narrows to about 3-4 at the tapered end where the webbing comes out. The
    double that works starts at 6 and narrows to
    4. The double that doesn't work starts at 7.75 and narrows to 3.75. But for comparison - and
    emphasizing your point - my 1st holder from a local dept store (step above wally-mart) was 2.5 in
    narrowing to 1.5 inches where a 1 inch belt comes out. And, yep, that'un definitely flops - but
    it was that or nothing for awhile.

    >
    > > inch belt works better for me than the effectively wider double 1-inch belts. While
    > > theoretically more stable, I find it has to ride too high (=affecting breathing) to be stable.
    >
    > What do you feel is being compressed to affect breathing. I know we are built differently ;) but
    > I'd have to have someone else with two free hands pull it to effect my breathing.
    >

    I tend to prefer things to ride low, like on my hips. When I got the one with the split belt
    initially, I was thinking that it would ride part on hips and part above, like a backpack hip belt.
    In order for that to happen, the pack hits butt so is unstable. When I position the pack so it rides
    stably (to accomodate a 10 inch tall cargo compartment), the top of buckle is about 2.5 inches below
    sternum and a lot of the belt is tightened around rib cage. I should also point out the buckles on
    that particular belt don't grab well so they slip. It's also fairly wide in back (I needed volume to
    carry gear at the time), which I think contributes to the problem. More importantly for me, it's got
    bottle holders with just strap bottoms, so it drains after river crossings or in heavy rains (I'm
    presuming), but that makes the bottles much more vulenerable to freezing. Regardless of fit, it's
    just a really poor winter pack.

    My newer double pack - with insulated bottle compartments including zip top :) - is about 2 inches
    shorter, is a little narrower in back, and the single waist belt fits better. It has less volume,
    but I've got lighter gear now that does fit in there. It works just right for the mid-length (about
    1+ hrs) winter runs. It rides well with one bottle and gear or two partial bottles and less gear.
    That's what I used when I was testing lights. If I put 2 full bottles and gear in there, then it
    starts getting a little uncomfortable. While I can tolerate it for 1.5 run, I definitely feel relief
    when unstrapping it.

    The backpacks work much better for me, and even in hiking, I've never really liked fanny packs. Not
    sure if decades of hiking and about 28 yrs of at least part-time bike commuting with book pack has
    anything to do with it.

    One thing I meant to mention in earlier post is that sometimes good compression straps or lack
    thereof can make or break a pack. Originally, I thought the straps across the cargo compartments on
    the bottle holders were just for lashing on an extra layer, but I find they can compress the load
    horizontally, to make the pack effectively narrower - which makes a big difference in the ride for
    us folks that aren't as wide bodied as others.

    I actually find my CB Cloudwalker rides better than the smaller UD Luna (designed for women although
    I got it for other reasons, like external pockets). The Cloudwalker has compression straps that work
    well. The Luna doesn't, and even with a full load, it seems to bounce more. Packs also fit a little
    better after you drink some, so that the pack conforms to body better than when it's full and
    somewhat rounded.

    As far as telling when you're running out of fluid, you can tell by the change in weight - unless
    you're removing or adding other things. In fact, you can tell even when you're running out earlier
    than expected because you mis-measured (doubled 20 and got 32 ;( but I was almost back anyway).
    20-oz bottles *always* seem to be almost out of fluid to me (too many years of wide-mouth liter
    bottles, I guess).

    As I'm sure you've recognized, some people have a body shape that can put on just about anything and
    run with it comfortably. Others just don't seem to fit certain things or any thing.

    CBs seem to be more common up here, partly because of water bottles freezing (can only imagine what
    happens to fuel belts), but also people tend to be go out and enjoy the woods for several hours -
    whether it's running, biking, skiing, hiking, etc. and the backpack versions are just so much more
    flexible than other devices. I did try a hand-carried bottle once and didn't like carrying things
    in my hands.

    Did somebody say something about you need to find what works for you? :)
    :)

    Dot so happy to have many kinks worked out of gear so I can just go run :)

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  18. >Plus I'm cheap.

    If you were really cheap (and smart) you'd buy a .59 cent H2O bottle, and a package of 1000 rubber
    bands for less than a dollar.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( . ) Rogers ass pre-Bill, ( 0 ) and Rogers ass post-Bill

    OO
     
  19. > camel backs with the moth tube)

    The plot thickens... now we have added moth tubes to bladders and hunchbacks.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( . ) Rogers ass pre-Bill, ( 0 ) and Rogers ass post-Bill

    OO
     
  20. David

    David Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I tried one once and found it annoying but that is me. Just a heads up, if you plan to use the FB
    > in a race be prepared to spend a pile of time refilling those little baby bottles.

    That depends on the distance. I'm running a half-marathon in a couple of weeks and 4 fuel belt
    bottles is enough for that distance for me... no refilling required. If you're going to use a water
    bottle, in my experience, there's really no option other than the Fuel Belt. Everything else I tried
    bounced and drove me crazy.
    --
    David Nova Scotia, Canada.
     
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