sapim cx ray spoke-zipp wheel truing



R

Rocky

Guest
Jobst, I've tried this. The force to unload a drive side spoke seems to be
more than enough to dislodge the wheel from my stand, even if I clamp it
down tight.

What kind of stand do you have?

Rocky



I have unloaded spokes, and not
> using thread lock, I have had no trouble turning the spoke nipples.
> THat requires a sturdy truing stand in which the rim can be pulled to
> the side of the spoke in question enough to slacken it. This works
> quickly and easily. With low spoke count that requiring higher
> tension than 32 or 36 spoke wheels, this becomes a regular problem.
>
 
Rocky Bastinado writes:

>>> I have had no trouble turning the spoke nipples.


>> That requires a sturdy truing stand in which the rim can be pulled
>> to the side of the spoke in question enough to slacken it. This
>> works quickly and easily. With low spoke count that requiring
>> higher tension than 32 or 36 spoke wheels, this becomes a regular
>> problem.


> Jobst, I've tried this. It seems to unload a drive side spoke takes
> more than enough force to dislodge the wheel from my stand even if I
> reef down on the clamping force.


> What kind of stand do you have?


I said sturdy truing stand but I did this on a bicycle fork and rear
frame for my nephew's 24-spoke track wheels on Fiamme Tipo-Pista Red
labels rims (the triangular cross section that had no brake track. In
those days, hollow cross section rims were made with eyelets and
sockets so they could withstand tension up to the compressive yield
(buckling force) so we didn't need no steenkin spoke prep, but we did
need extra tension to keep the spokes from becoming slack (and
unscrewing) in use.

I'm sure you can find a way to do this, now that you know what it
takes. You should have little trouble with left side spokes because
they are not as tight, and they are more easily unloaded for that
reason.

Jobst Brandt