Scafell Pike from Seathwaite - estimates for how long??

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Frank Weaver, Feb 12, 2004.

  1. Frank Weaver

    Frank Weaver Guest

    We're going up to the Lakes next week and intend to do Scafell Pike for the first time. My wife is
    ill at the moment so I'll just be doing it with my 13 & 11 year old boys (+ dog).

    I'd like some estimates for times please - I don't want to push too hard but want to ensure we get
    up & down in reasonable time

    From what I've read the preferred route from Seathwaite is Taylorgill Force - Sty Head - Corridor
    Route - Lingmell col - Scafell Pike.

    Returning via Esk Hause and Grains Gill to Stockley Bridge.

    many thanks for your speedy replies!!

    Frank
     
    Tags:


  2. Ron Barker

    Ron Barker Guest

    Given that daylight fades by 5 p.m. You need to aim to be off the fells by 4
    p.m. to allow a safety margin. With boys of this age I would set off as early as you can in the
    morning to allow for any eventualities and the weary trudge of tired youngsters who do not have
    the stamina of older people.

    The weather forecast is for cloud and potentially some rain so you may have some navigation issues -
    certainly a map and compass job if the cloud is thick.

    Naismiths rule will tell you the average timing you should expect for a fit adult. You then need to
    factor in extra time according to your expectations from your boys. If you don't know how to do this
    then I would avoid this route this weekend, especially with boys that age. Leave the first attempt
    for better weather. The current fell conditions on Helvellyn reports snow patches and recommends
    full winter gear should be taken.

    I'm not wanting to be a kill joy but this is a long route in good conditions and young kids die
    easily. Be sure you can get them out of anything you put them into.

    Ron

    "Frank Weaver" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > We're going up to the Lakes next week and intend to do Scafell Pike for the first time. My wife is
    > ill at the moment so I'll just be doing it with my 13 & 11 year old boys (+ dog).
    >
    > I'd like some estimates for times please - I don't want to push too hard but want to ensure we get
    > up & down in reasonable time
    >
    > From what I've read the preferred route from Seathwaite is Taylorgill Force - Sty Head - Corridor
    > Route - Lingmell col - Scafell Pike.
    >
    > Returning via Esk Hause and Grains Gill to Stockley Bridge.
    >
    > many thanks for your speedy replies!!
    >
    > Frank
     
  3. Bernard

    Bernard Guest

    "Frank Weaver" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:c9e8f66[email protected]...
    > We're going up to the Lakes next week and intend to do Scafell Pike for the first time. My wife is
    > ill at the moment so I'll just be doing it with my 13 & 11 year old boys (+ dog).
    >
    > I'd like some estimates for times please - I don't want to push too hard but want to ensure we get
    > up & down in reasonable time
    >
    > From what I've read the preferred route from Seathwaite is Taylorgill Force - Sty Head - Corridor
    > Route - Lingmell col - Scafell Pike.
    >
    > Returning via Esk Hause and Grains Gill to Stockley Bridge.
    >
    > many thanks for your speedy replies!!
    >
    > Frank
    My gut reaction to this question is "If you have to ask it, you should not be planning such a walk".
    However my considered response is you need to ask yourself the following questions.

    How fit are you and your lads. Also how much experience of walking have your lads got? One of the
    things I discovered with my sons when they were that age was the fact that they can be fit but lack
    stamina, though a chocolate biscuit every half hour did help. From my experience stamina is built up
    over time, through experience.

    How have you and your sons faired when you have done other walks? I would compare their times on
    other walks with the corresponding Naismith time and use that as guide.

    According to my bit of string, it's just over 13km so let's round that to 14km and assuming I have
    not miscounted the contours, it's about 910m of height gain. This gives a Naismith time of 259
    minutes. I would include as an absolute minimum an extra 10% for stoppage time.

    Other factors to be aware of, is, time of year and weather conditions. You need to be prepared for
    snow and ice. I am assuming you are not experienced winter walkers and so you need to be prepared to
    turn back if conditions are unsafe for your level of skill and experience. How are your navigation
    skills in thick mist? Its amazing how much time can be spent taking and checking bearings in thick
    fog and the effect that fog can have on your walking speed if your are not totally confident in the
    route to follow.

    In the end only you can really answer the question you have asked. If the conditions are right and
    you are all fit, you'll get round no problem. If there are fitness problems and poor conditions you
    may struggle.

    Regards

    Bernard
     
  4. In message <[email protected]>, Frank Weaver
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Thanks for your advice chaps. No problems on the fitness front for the boys (and as long as my old
    >hamstrings keep working I'll be ok).

    So what commensurate walks have you done at this time of year with your boys to be confident about
    this? Unless you have done 14km distance and 1000m of ascent you DO NOT KNOW whether it will be a
    problem. Now this sort of walk has to be done on a first occasion, but one would expect a certain
    amount of caution to temper the optimism.

    >Navigation shouldn't be a problem either - haven't had much need of it for previous walks & climbs
    >but years of sailing experience should see us through ok - when at sea we always turn back if it
    >looks dodgy - so we won't be taking unnecessary risks

    W&£%$E(&IFPO*{)[email protected]{_!!!!!!!!!!!!??????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    You are kidding aren't you?

    You don't seriously believe that ability to navigate sailing can be translated into expertise on
    the hills?

    If it was the other way round and a friend told you he could navigate at sea with no problem because
    he was used to walking would you believe him?

    The two tasks are quite different and have different problems.

    --
    Michael Farthing cyclades Software House
     
  5. Frank Weaver

    Frank Weaver Guest

    Thanks for your advice chaps. No problems on the fitness front for the boys (and as long as my old
    hamstrings keep working I'll be ok). Navigation shouldn't be a problem either - haven't had much
    need of it for previous walks & climbs but years of sailing experience should see us through ok -
    when at sea we always turn back if it looks dodgy - so we won't be taking unnecessary risks
     
  6. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >If it was the other way round and a friend told you he could navigate at sea with no problem
    >because he was used to walking would you believe him?

    No because , lets face it, marine navigation is far harder than hill navigation.

    Go on, pick a good weather day and enjoy!

    Richard Webb
     
  7. In message <[email protected]>, RJ Webb
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >>If it was the other way round and a friend told you he could navigate at sea with no problem
    >>because he was used to walking would you believe him?
    >
    >No because , lets face it, marine navigation is far harder than hill navigation.

    Gaelic is harder to learn than Esperanto (1), but an expert in Gaelic cannot therefore assume he can
    immediately speak Esperanto without any practice.

    >
    >Go on, pick a good weather day and enjoy!
    >
    >Richard Webb

    I wasn't meaning to suggest he shouldn't do it, but it did strike me that he seemed a little unaware
    of, or was too glibly discounting, some of the potential problems.

    Notes
    -----
    1. If you haven't looked at Gaelic, rest assured, it is an impossible language.

    --
    Michael Farthing cyclades Software House
     
  8. Theo

    Theo Guest

    "RJ Webb" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > No because , lets face it, marine navigation is far harder than hill navigation.
    >
    > Go on, pick a good weather day and enjoy!
    >
    > Richard Webb

    But on sea you don't encounter ravines, gills, streams you can't wade through when in spate,
    rockwalls you can't climb, icy patches (normally), snowfields etc. They can make you go the way your
    navigationskills say not to go.

    Theo
     
  9. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    RJ Webb <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>If it was the other way round and a friend told you he could navigate at sea with no problem
    >>because he was used to walking would you believe him?
    >
    >No because , lets face it, marine navigation is far harder than hill navigation.
    >
    >Go on, pick a good weather day and enjoy!
    >
    But write the trip report first - just in case. :cool:
    --
    Gordon
     
  10. > We're going up to the Lakes next week and intend to do Scafell Pike for the first time. My wife is
    > ill at the moment so I'll just be doing it with my 13 & 11 year old boys (+ dog).

    Dont forget to get the weather from the National Park Weatherline on 017687 75757. Updated for the
    following day after 5:00pm. Good forecast for the Fells with such things as wind speed, temp,
    cloud cover and wind-chill factor for 3000ft (Scafell Pike region). Also, take a look at the
    weather forecast at www.wasdaleweb.co.uk, again a good indication of conditions. Included is a 72
    hour forecast.

    > I'd like some estimates for times please - I don't want to push too hard but want to ensure we get
    > up & down in reasonable time
    >
    > From what I've read the preferred route from Seathwaite is Taylorgill Force - Sty Head - Corridor
    > Route - Lingmell col - Scafell Pike.

    This is the route Clare and I do as it is generally quieter than via Esk Huase, however, it isn't an
    easy route for the unfamiliar. The path is mostly over rocks which can be difficlut to see in baad
    weather. There is one rocky step to go down just before Piers Gill, onto a ledge, which requires
    care. Will be worse if ice on the rocks. Also, easy to miss the path up the final section of Scafell
    Pike from Lingmell Col if the visibility is poor. Path is not very clear on the ground.

    > Returning via Esk Hause and Grains Gill to Stockley Bridge.

    This would be the route I would use, up and down, for the first time if unsure at this time of year.
    Although, again, in poor visibilty it requires care from Calf Cove around Broad Crag to the col
    above Little Narrowcove

    > many thanks for your speedy replies!!

    If you want to get a feel for the route, take a look at the Lake District photos on my website from
    previous trips via the Corridor Route.

    It is a good walk out .... but as always on the Fells, treat them with respect.

    --
    Sandy Saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still brings
    the same excitement'
     
  11. In message <[email protected]>, Frank Weaver
    <[email protected]> writes
    >It's exactly these sort of responses that I'm sure puts a lot of people off asking.

    If you only want replies that confirm your views then what's the point of asking? You got my honest
    assessment. You can take note; just ignore it or ignore it and complain that it isn't what you
    wanted to hear. OK if you go for the last and it puts you off asking then you've saved yourself and
    everyone else a bit of effort.

    >
    >I'm certainly not being glib about it and will obviously be taking a lot of care - otherwise I
    >would not have asked people with the knowledge in the first place.
    >
    >By mentioning my sailing experience I was trying to show that I have a bit of experience of
    >situations, a bit of sense and might cope with problems that might hit us. Mainly I will be as
    >prepared as much as I can
    >
    >No, I haven't done it before, I'm sure it won't be easy BUT I have done my research

    Well, as I say, that's not how it seemed to me. And you didn't like me saying so. Tough. I'm
    not going to start lying just to please you: it would short change those that ask and listen to
    the replies.

    --
    Michael Farthing cyclades Software House
     
  12. Frank Weaver

    Frank Weaver Guest

    It's exactly these sort of responses that I'm sure puts a lot of people off asking.

    I'm certainly not being glib about it and will obviously be taking a lot of care - otherwise I would
    not have asked people with the knowledge in the first place.

    By mentioning my sailing experience I was trying to show that I have a bit of experience of
    situations, a bit of sense and might cope with problems that might hit us. Mainly I will be as
    prepared as much as I can

    No, I haven't done it before, I'm sure it won't be easy BUT I have done my research
     
  13. Andyp

    Andyp Guest

    "Frank Weaver" <[email protected]> wrote

    > It's exactly these sort of responses that I'm sure puts a lot of people off asking.
    >
    > I'm certainly not being glib about it and will obviously be taking a lot of care - otherwise I
    > would not have asked people with the knowledge in the first place.

    So long as you have got the right attitude and a bit of common sense the fells of the Lake District
    aren't the scary place some would have you believe. From looking at the weather forecasts and
    webcams it seems unlikely that you will encounter desperate winter conditions next week and you no
    doubt won't be alone up there should you need any guidance. As for time, the book I've got suggests
    5-7 hours (not counting stops) for a similar circuit taking in the Corridor Route starting from
    Wasdale Head rather than Seathwaite (is that a bit shorter maybe?, I don't have a map to hand) and
    you have what, about 10 hours of daylight at the moment. Start early and have a good walk.
     
  14. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 19:39:53 -0000, "AndyP"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Frank Weaver" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> It's exactly these sort of responses that I'm sure puts a lot of people off asking.
    >>
    >> I'm certainly not being glib about it and will obviously be taking a lot of care - otherwise I
    >> would not have asked people with the knowledge in the first place.
    >
    >So long as you have got the right attitude and a bit of common sense the fells of the Lake District
    >aren't the scary place some would have you believe. From looking at the weather forecasts and
    >webcams it seems unlikely that you will encounter desperate winter conditions next week and you no
    >doubt won't be alone up there should you need any guidance. As for time, the book I've got suggests
    >5-7 hours (not counting stops) for a similar circuit taking in the Corridor Route starting from
    >Wasdale Head rather than Seathwaite (is that a bit shorter maybe?, I don't have a map to hand) and
    >you have what, about 10 hours of daylight at the moment. Start early and have a good walk.
    >

    I agree. It's light enough to walk without a torch for nearly 11 hours. If the weather looks like
    being grim/icy, you could always use Esk Hause both ways. If you're used to navigating then the
    chances are, if it's misty, that you will be helping someone else at Esk Hause
    - it's notorious for people getting lost!

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  15. Ken

    Ken Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Frank Weaver
    <[email protected]> writes
    >It's exactly these sort of responses that I'm sure puts a lot of people off asking.
    >
    >I'm certainly not being glib about it and will obviously be taking a lot of care - otherwise I
    >would not have asked people with the knowledge in the first place.
    >
    >By mentioning my sailing experience I was trying to show that I have a bit of experience of
    >situations, a bit of sense and might cope with problems that might hit us. Mainly I will be as
    >prepared as much as I can
    >
    >No, I haven't done it before, I'm sure it won't be easy BUT I have done my research
    just wondering whether Taylor Gill Force is doggable. It's a bit sort of scrambly.

    --
    Ken
     
  16. Ken

    Ken Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, sandy saunders
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >This is the route Clare and I do as it is generally quieter than via Esk Huase, however, it isn't
    >an easy route for the unfamiliar. The path is mostly over rocks which can be difficlut to see in
    >baad weather. There is one rocky step to go down just before Piers Gill, onto a ledge, which
    >requires care. Will be worse if ice on the rocks. Also, easy to miss the path up the final section
    >of Scafell Pike from Lingmell Col if the visibility is poor. Path is not very clear on the ground.

    I thought I saw a made up path (at the start) when I was there last September. I wasn't paying
    attention at the time as I was on my way to Hollow Stones.
    >
    >'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still brings the same excitement'
    >
    >

    --
    Ken
     
  17. Tim Jackson

    Tim Jackson Guest

    sandy saunders wrote on Fri, 13 Feb 2004 16:20:50 -0000....

    [Frank Weaver:]
    > > We're going up to the Lakes next week and intend to do Scafell Pike for the first time. My wife
    > > is ill at the moment so I'll just be doing it with my 13 & 11 year old boys (+ dog).
    >
    > Dont forget to get the weather from the National Park Weatherline on 017687 75757. Updated for the
    > following day after 5:00pm. Good forecast for the Fells with such things as wind speed, temp,
    > cloud cover and wind-chill factor for 3000ft (Scafell Pike region). Also, take a look at the
    > weather forecast at www.wasdaleweb.co.uk, again a good indication of conditions. Included is a 72
    > hour forecast.

    I think the weather forecast is the key to this trip. Adjust your plans according to what it says.

    If it's good, you'll no doubt have an excellent time, and you'll be exclaiming about what a lot of
    ninnies there are in u.r.w. who tried to persuade you against it.

    But if there's snow, ice and/or mist, then what people have said elsewhere in this thread
    is all true.

    > >
    > > From what I've read the preferred route from Seathwaite is Taylorgill Force - Sty Head -
    > > Corridor Route - Lingmell col - Scafell Pike.

    A great route in good conditions. The path up the right-hand side of Taylorgill Force is a little
    scrambly, which personally I enjoy. But if you want this can be avoided by taking the well-made path
    from Stockley Bridge to Sty Head on the other side of the Force.

    > This is the route Clare and I do as it is generally quieter than via Esk Huase,

    Well, I'm sure there'll be people around, especially at Sty Head.

    > however, it isn't an easy route for the unfamiliar. The path is mostly over rocks which can be
    > difficlut to see in baad weather. There is one rocky step to go down just before Piers Gill, onto
    > a ledge, which requires care. Will be worse if ice on the rocks. Also, easy to miss the path up
    > the final section of Scafell Pike from Lingmell Col if the visibility is poor. Path is not very
    > clear on the ground.

    This advice is spot on. (The rocky step is just before Greta Gill, which is a short distance before
    Piers Gill.)
    >
    > > Returning via Esk Hause and Grains Gill to Stockley Bridge.
    >
    > This would be the route I would use, up and down, for the first time if unsure at this time of
    > year. Although, again, in poor visibilty it requires care from Calf Cove around Broad Crag to the
    > col above Little Narrowcove

    Again, I think this advice is spot on. In bad weather, this is the way I would probably go myself,
    but I'd be wary about taking the kids.

    --
    Tim Jackson [email protected] (Change '.invalid' to '.co.uk' to reply direct)
    Absurd patents: visit http://www.patent.freeserve.co.uk
     
  18. Frank Weaver

    Frank Weaver Guest

    I was after honest advice & opinions since I haven't attempted this walk/climb before - I'm sure
    many have done it without outside help

    I am really grateful for all of that - including the actual content of yours

    Maybe it was your high-handed delivery that was unnecessary
     
  19. Ian Dainty

    Ian Dainty Guest

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I agree. It's light enough to walk without a torch for nearly 11 hours. If the weather looks like
    > being grim/icy, you could always use Esk Hause both ways. If you're used to navigating then the
    > chances are, if it's misty, that you will be helping someone else at Esk Hause
    > - it's notorious for people getting lost!

    Indeed.

    Ian.

    --
    Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
     
  20. Frank Weaver

    Frank Weaver Guest

    Thanks for that Sandy - I had come across your site eariler in the week - great pictures
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Scafell Seathwaite estimates
  1. Gizmo_says
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,191
Loading...