shimano nexus 8 hub gear



M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> The gearing will "slip", after a shift, not changing
> gears but losing engagement and then recovering. The sound it
> makes is not reassuring and is unlikely to be improved by more
> muscle on the pedals. The problem was reduced by a visit to the
> dealer, but not eliminated.


Never shift under load - no bicycle gears are made to be changed whilst
putting lots of power through the chain. Slacken off briefly until the
change is made and then stomp on the power. If you think it's the gears,
get a mechanic to do a test ride - if it's shifting fine the problem is you
abusing the poor bike ;)
 
R

Roger Burton West

Guest
bob prohaska's usenet account wrote:

>I'm a smallish rider, recently obliged by a broken foot to ride
>my dad's Nexus-8 equipped Breezer. It's a wonderful bike, easy
>to ride and immensely convenient, but the hub does not seem up to a
>very strong rider. The gearing will "slip", after a shift, not changing
>gears but losing engagement and then recovering.


Other people have already suggested not shifting under load... I'd also
recommend taking a look at the adjustment, as my Nexus 8 has a nasty
tendency to slip out of line when the bike's been transported by other
means.

It was great for learning to ride, it's ideal for urban riding where I
rarely get up to a high speed, and for me it's fine on all but the
steepest hills.

Roger
 
B

bob prohaska's usenet account

Guest
In rec.bicycles.tech Mark Thompson <[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote:
>
> Never shift under load - no bicycle gears are made to be changed whilst
> putting lots of power through the chain. Slacken off briefly until the
> change is made and then stomp on the power. If you think it's the gears,


In general I'm pretty a remembering to ease off during upshifts, sometimes
I forget.

> get a mechanic to do a test ride - if it's shifting fine the problem is you
> abusing the poor bike ;)

The mechanic did a test ride, adjusted the shift linkage and said a
certain amount of slippage was to be expected. He seemed to imply that
as long as the slips were "single" steps and not repeated it was
normal.

It must be a rather fussy adjustment, set by trial and error (or is it
trial _by_ error?) not just the marks on the shift spool. Whatever he
did, it cut the incidence of slips to about half what I had before.

bob prohaska
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
> Mark Thompson <[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote:
>> Never shift under load - no bicycle gears are made to be changed whilst
>> putting lots of power through the chain. Slacken off briefly until the
>> change is made and then stomp on the power. If you think it's the gears,


bob prohaska's usenet account wrote:
> In general I'm pretty a remembering to ease off during upshifts, sometimes
> I forget.


(MT)
>> get a mechanic to do a test ride - if it's shifting fine the problem is you
>> abusing the poor bike ;)


(BP)
> The mechanic did a test ride, adjusted the shift linkage and said a
> certain amount of slippage was to be expected. He seemed to imply that
> as long as the slips were "single" steps and not repeated it was
> normal.
> It must be a rather fussy adjustment, set by trial and error (or is it
> trial _by_ error?) not just the marks on the shift spool. Whatever he
> did, it cut the incidence of slips to about half what I had before.


I for one do not believe missed shifts or skipping is normal or acceptable.

Most shifting problems we've seen center on cable issues, 4mm casing
with plastic ferrules, casing length issues, kinked wires, etc.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, bob
prohaska's usenet account
[email protected] says...
> In rec.bicycles.tech Mark Thompson <[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote:
> >
> > Never shift under load - no bicycle gears are made to be changed whilst
> > putting lots of power through the chain. Slacken off briefly until the
> > change is made and then stomp on the power. If you think it's the gears,

>
> In general I'm pretty a remembering to ease off during upshifts, sometimes
> I forget.
>
> > get a mechanic to do a test ride - if it's shifting fine the problem is you
> > abusing the poor bike ;)

> The mechanic did a test ride, adjusted the shift linkage and said a
> certain amount of slippage was to be expected. He seemed to imply that
> as long as the slips were "single" steps and not repeated it was
> normal.


He might want you to believe that, but I think it's really just an
admission that he can't fix it. But I have abolutely no experience with
these hubs so I could be mistaken.
 
M

Membrane

Guest
bob prohaska's usenet account <[email protected]> wrote:

>The mechanic did a test ride, adjusted the shift linkage and said a
>certain amount of slippage was to be expected. He seemed to imply that
>as long as the slips were "single" steps and not repeated it was
>normal.
>
>It must be a rather fussy adjustment, set by trial and error (or is it
>trial _by_ error?) not just the marks on the shift spool. Whatever he
>did, it cut the incidence of slips to about half what I had before.


Adjusting the gear cable on my Nexus 7 is a finicky job, the marker
movement between 2 gears is quite small. My Nexus 7 has 2 sets of
markers, one is visible with the bike upright, the other is visible with
the bike upside down. Initially I aligned the "upright" markers, this
resulted in spontaneous gear shifts. Using small adjustments of the
adjustment barrel whilst on the move I found a setting that worked
reliably by trial and error. I then looked again at the markers, the
"upright" markers were slightly misaligned, but the "upside down"
markers were aligned. Since then I've used the "upside down" markers and
I get reliable shifting.

--
Membrane
 
R

Roger Merriman

Guest
Rob Morley <[email protected]> wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>, bob
> prohaska's usenet account
> [email protected] says...
> > In rec.bicycles.tech Mark Thompson
> > <[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote: >
> > > Never shift under load - no bicycle gears are made to be changed whilst
> > > putting lots of power through the chain. Slacken off briefly until the
> > > change is made and then stomp on the power. If you think it's the gears,

> >
> > In general I'm pretty a remembering to ease off during upshifts, sometimes
> > I forget.
> >
> > > get a mechanic to do a test ride - if it's shifting fine the problem
> > > is you abusing the poor bike ;)

> > The mechanic did a test ride, adjusted the shift linkage and said a
> > certain amount of slippage was to be expected. He seemed to imply that
> > as long as the slips were "single" steps and not repeated it was
> > normal.

>
> He might want you to believe that, but I think it's really just an
> admission that he can't fix it. But I have abolutely no experience with
> these hubs so I could be mistaken.


i again have no experience with hub gears but that sounds too much like
a excuse, then again i may be overly cinical!

roger