Shoulder pain during touring

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by biztourer, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. biztourer

    biztourer New Member

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    I went from daily rides of no more than an hour or two to biking every day for 8 hours with no training in between. My trap muscles in my left shoulder started hurting the second day in. It's now the 7th day and over 70 miles later (with 4 days rest in between 3 eight hour days) and my shoulder still hurts in the same place/way after long rides. I tried lifting the handlebars and adjusting the seat but it didn't help. I don't know if I should keep on or go hitchhiking instead. Thoughts? More details: I am riding a hybrid diamondback road bike. My tour is planned to go another 4 months. I've always had to switch hand positions on the handlebars to stay comfortable on this bike.
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I think that most, if not all, Hybrid bikes come with FLAT handlebars ...

    While some people have successfully toured with Flat handlebars ...

    If it happens to be the case that your Diamondback has Flat handlebars, then because you are experiencing discomfort then you probably need to consider:

    1. bar ends ...
      • I would mount TWO sets ...... the outboard set angled at about 60º above level OR whatever is comfortable for you
      • and, a second set a little inboard which is angled at closer to level
    2. or, changing to Drop Bars + suitable (i.e., Campagnolo ... accept NO substitutes) shifters ...
      • changing the bars & shifters would cost less than $200 if you were at home and could DIY...... if you know that you will be staying someplace else for a few days, then you can have what you need shipped to you OR mailed to you via GENERAL DELIVERY (THAT's what people who hike the Appalachian Trail do to replenish supplies)
      • more recent Campagnolo shifters require a T25 Torx Wrench ... very annoying, IMO
      • if you opt for Drop Bars, you will also need MASKING TAPE (duct tape or packing tape will do) to bind the cable housing to the handlebars + the actual handlebar tape you plan to use + scissors-or-knife ... PLUS, you will need some "dikes" to snip the bicycle cables, cleanly, many won't & that is why PARK sell a dedicated cable cutter ...
      • if you have an LBS do the conversion, look at spending closer to $300 for parts & labor
      • of course, your old handlebar & shifters can be shipped home OR lug them along with you (they can't weight that much ... lash the handlebars to your frame or to your rear rack).

    ALSO, while others have disagreed with me on the following in the past, I feel that if you are using a handlebar bag that you should not put more than ~3 lbs in it ...

    And, front pannier weight should be limited to about 20 lbs.

    The LESS WEIGHT that you have to steer the better!!

    BTW. There are NO GUARANTEES that either adding Bar Ends or changing to Drop Bars will mitigate-or-eliminate the discomfort which you are experiencing.

    ALSO, some soft tissue injuries take a long time to "heal" ...

    In the meantime, take some Ibuprofen, as needed ... and/or Aspirin.
     
  3. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    cut down your days into 4 hours riding, possible with a break in between, 2 hours in the morning, lunch and rest, two hours in the afternoon, aside from medication try some healing cream in the area where it hurts,
     
  4. hardee41

    hardee41 New Member

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    I tour a lot. Long days and many weeks for quite a few years. I think you'll find that you will have to put more weight on your seat (requires a touring saddle) and less weight on your hands/arms/shoulders.
    On my touring bikes I purchased stem extenders. My bars are raised about 8"; also moving my seat forward helps. Good luck; I hope the wind is behind you. harley
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Actually that doesn't require a "touring saddle" at all. It just requires a more upright position and a saddle that works with that position.
     
  6. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    well the original poster made a direct transition from 1 hour rides tops into 8 hours ride, im surprised he doesn't reports tendons or other injuries and just a shoulder trap muscle pain
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    That's true. The pain could just be from over use as a result of the sudden and large increase in ride length. His fit could still be fine. I'm kind of surprised that he doesn't have back or neck pain with the sudden onset of big miles.
     
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