Smelly vests



C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
"W K" <[email protected]> writes:

>Why does anyone bother with non-bio? Bio works better, and
>the scares about it were testicular.

Makes me itch. Have met several folk who have independently
discovered the same thing. I'm not scared of itching, I just
prefer not to.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 23/3/04 11:03 am, in article
[email protected], "Mark Thompson"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>> Why does anyone bother with non-bio? Bio works better,
>> and the scares about it were testicular.
>
> Some people are sensitive to it

Itchy especially if you don't rinse well. It is also
contraindicated for certain fabrics. (the enzymes are
proteases, don't go using them on silk, wool or at a
stretch, polyamide)

..d
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 23/3/04 1:35 pm, in article [email protected], "Jon
Senior" <jon_AT_restlesslemon.co.uk> wrote:

> "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Why does anyone bother with non-bio? Bio works better,
>> and the scares about it were testicular.

> "Testicular"? A polite way of saying "bollocks"?

> Anyway, the enzymes used are (if recall correctly)
> proteases, namely they "eat" proteins. Struck me as being
> a bad call for most natural fibres and

Bad for protein based ones, ie wool and silk. Should be fine
for cellulose based ones such as cotton or linen.

Polyamide is a sort of synthetic protein (OK all you
chemists out there, I know it isn't a protein, but the
hydrolysable bond in proteins is the same as that in the
polyamides) so I would suspect that these fabrics may be
susceptible long term to biological detergents.

The other enzymes may be peroxidases to aid with bleaching
and making the clothes look whiter.

> certainly if they are not removed by washing, they can't
> do any good. Whether or not they do harm is a different
> matter, but certainly some people appear to react to them.

hence the itchy testicles. Most unpleasant. I personally
prefer ordinary detergent and heat (and yes I am a
biochemist(ish) by profession.)

..d
 
W

W K

Guest
"Chris Malcolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "W K" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> >Why does anyone bother with non-bio? Bio works better,
> >and the scares about it were testicular.
>
> Makes me itch. Have met several folk who have
> independently discovered the same thing. I'm not scared of
> itching, I just prefer not to.

Are you sure it does?

I'd have thought they should be rinsed enough to get
rid of it.

BTW: Dust mites and wearing jumpers+ t-shirt make me look
like I've had a once over (all over) with a cheese grater.
 
J

Jon Senior

Guest
"David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:BC85FB99.10568%[email protected]...
> hence the itchy testicles. Most unpleasant. I personally
> prefer ordinary detergent and heat (and yes I am a
> biochemist(ish) by profession.)

Not sure that anyone mentioned itchy testicles directly
but hey...

Jon - A biochemist by qualification, but not by profession!
 
W

W K

Guest
"David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:BC85FB99.10568%[email protected]...

> Polyamide is a sort of synthetic protein (OK all you
> chemists out there, I know it isn't a protein, but the
> hydrolysable bond in proteins is the same as that in the
> polyamides) so I would suspect that these fabrics may be
> susceptible long term to biological detergents.

Surely most proteases have a specificity that makes them
work better with certain combinations of amino acids at
either side of that bond. I would imagine that such a
bond would not really get its self into the active site
of the enzyme properly because polyamides are not shaped
like a protein.

And no imagination: Nylon tents don't rot (?)
 
M

Marc

Guest
W K <[email protected]> wrote:

> >
> > Quite a few people find that biological washing powder
> > makes them itch.
> It's
> > one reason why it's recommended that you don't wash baby
> > clothes in bio
> stuff.
>
> I'm sorry, but as you may have noted, I'm cynical on this
> point. I have heard too many people spout too much
> nonesense about what does and does not cause skin
> allergies.
>
> Have they actually tried it?

Yes, I notice within minutes if a different detergent is
used, or if the detergent has had it's formula changed.

--
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D

David Martin

Guest
On 24/3/04 9:40 am, in article [email protected], "W K"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
> "David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:BC85FB99.10568%[email protected]...
>
>> Polyamide is a sort of synthetic protein (OK all you
>> chemists out there, I know it isn't a protein, but the
>> hydrolysable bond in proteins is the same as that in the
>> polyamides) so I would suspect that these fabrics may be
>> susceptible long term to biological detergents.
>
> Surely most proteases have a specificity that makes them
> work better with certain combinations of amino acids at
> either side of that bond. I would imagine that such a bond
> would not really get its self into the active site of the
> enzyme properly because polyamides are not shaped like a
> protein.
>
Indeed. The proteases tend to be fairly nonspecific (not
care too much about the adjoining residues [1]). But given
the heat that one can use in a wash, you may get a lot more
thermal motion that could allow polyamide to fit into the
active site. There are many synthetic substrates for
proteases so it is not an impossible scenario.

Whether it makes any difference in teh real world (probably
more damage form the agitation and wearing th eclothes) is
open to question.

> And no imagination: Nylon tents don't rot (?)

They do degrade though. (different mechanism)

..d

[1] Proteases are proteins. Proteins are a chain of amino
acids of which there are about 20 common types. Yes this
does mean that proteases eat themselves.

..d