Tires, tubes or not.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by kyperman, Apr 28, 2007.

  1. kyperman

    kyperman New Member

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    The used Trek I just bought came with some tires that I want to replace, they have a presta valve, but appear to be all one unit, not a tire and a tube. I am a newbie, and I can't seem to find this type of tire on Nashbar, what is this type ot tire called?
     
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  2. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    If the tire is glued onto the rim (my guess) you have sew ups.

    Sew ups are a little lighter in weight than the much more commonly used clincher tires mostly because the flangeless rims are lighter. Most riders also report sew ups as having superior ride qualities. Downsides (besides price) are that punctured sew ups are much more difficult and time consuming to repair and a first class installation job onto a rim takes a couple of days.

    If you want to replace the tires with more common ones your best bet is to ebay the wheels and tires and buy a new, conventional wheelset.
     
  3. melslur

    melslur New Member

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    By the way, "sew-ups" are also called "tubulars"
     
  4. kyperman

    kyperman New Member

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    I am learning a lot here, thanks....what would be the reason to stick with tubular or go with something different? I got this bike pretty cheap, I don't care to stick a fortune into it really. I think I better learn how to install a tubular tire...

    Do any of you guys use tubular?
     
  5. melslur

    melslur New Member

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    In general, tubulars are lighter and have better road feel. However, they are glued to the rim, which means that they can be messy to install, and perhaps more importantly, you better know what you are doing or you may find your poorly-glued tire rolling off in a corner. The guys who use tubulars tend to be hard-core racers, not the average guy out for a ride. If I were you, I would probably ask at your local bike club if anyone is willing to trade a pair of "clinchers" (rims+old tires + tube) for your tubulars. Likely someone has a set of clinchers they don't use much. This way, you will have less hassle and be safer, for little or no cost.
     
  6. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    I would strongly recommend that you get rid of the tubulars and get clinchers. In my personal experience, the improved ride quality was not worth the rather long hike that I took when one of these suckers went flat. I was told that you can stick a replacement tire/tube assembly on the rim and ride very carefully back home. This bit of "advice" cost me a tubular rim and some skin.:(

    Also, installing new tires on the rims is really a pain in the ischial bones, what with the glue, pre-stretching the tires, cleaning the rims, and the precise stitching required.
     
  7. Scarantino

    Scarantino New Member

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    Are you sure you have tubulars? It seems odd that a "cheap" bike would come with them.

    I think tubulars are going to be phased out eventualy. Clicnhers are going to catch up in the weight department soon enough.
     
  8. kyperman

    kyperman New Member

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    I am sure I have tubulars, I have identified the type of tire and am 100 percent sure they are, I have a spare also that came with the bike so I have a tire off the rim...it is tubular.


    The bike was cheap, but it was used, thus cheap. It is Trek 760, 1985 to be exact. It has campy components. I have already switched out the handlebars and am adding a new seat post. I don't know if I care to spend 200 bucks on a new wheelset, ya know? I could ask around if anyone whats to trade as was suggested. I am really leaning toward just keeping the tubulars for now unless I can find a good deal somewhere. Anyone out there reading have an extra pair they want to trade or sell ? How about using the tubular tape I have been reading about, seems cheaper and easier than the glue.
     
  9. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    Probably safest to learn how to fit and repair tubulars from an expert - you could join a local club? Potential for dangerous stuff-ups is definitely there.
     
  10. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with Artemidorus about this! Tubulars are not something to mess around with unless you are experienced with them. The potential for serious bodily harm is great if they are not glued right. I have the scars to prove it.
     
  11. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Being an 1985 model, the rear wheel may not be compatible with modern bikes as it is probably too narror, so I doubt you will get someone to swap wheels with you.
     
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