Titanium

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ryan Cooper, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Ryan Cooper

    Ryan Cooper New Member

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    What kind of races are titanium bikes good for? How come there were no Litespeeds or Merlins in the Tour de France?
     
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  2. Catabolic_Jones

    Catabolic_Jones New Member

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  3. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    The Postal team rode the time trials in the 1999 Tour de France on Litespeeds painted to look like Treks.

    Magnus Backstedt won the 2004 Paris Roubaix on a Bianchi S9. It was the prototype version without the carbon seat stays. This is probably the kind of race that titanium frames are best suited for.
     
  4. Eden

    Eden New Member

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    Don't know if its true, but I heard a rumor the neutral service bikes in the Tour are Litespeeds? of course I guess that doesn't necessarily mean that they are Ti either?
     
  5. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Possibly in the past. This year they were Scott CR1's.
     
  6. bucfan471

    bucfan471 New Member

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    not since then all Discovery/Postal bikes are OCLV carbon.
     
  7. Hookyrider

    Hookyrider New Member

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    Don't forget Lotto rode Litespeeds in 2004.
     
  8. frusso

    frusso New Member

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    That’s why I love my Litespeed. When I’m participating in our locale races or our weekly group rides I’m usually the only one riding a Litespeed. I’ve also replaced the black seat post with a silver Dura Ace and with my Mavic Ksyrium SL, Nice
     
  9. Hookyrider

    Hookyrider New Member

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    I have two - Over here in the NL they are a Super-exotic. Kind of fun having grown adults asking premission to touch them :)

    Bottom line I felt they were the most bang for my buck...

    Lately though (especially for 05) most of the Tour Teams have had Carbon or Carbon/Al frames, I'd have to look through my GE Kicker magazine to see who had what, but one team was riding Carbon/Ti - Decathalon maybe. Ti-Triangle CF stays and fork, if memory serves.

    it was nice to see Litspeed fire back with the new ultra light G-frame this year http://www.litespeed.com/bikes/2006/road/ghisallo_.aspx
    and these guys show that Ti is still lightweight - Carbon is just getting it's time in the spot light.
    http://www.fairwheelbikes.com/gallery.html

    HR
     
  10. Las Montanas

    Las Montanas New Member

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    The problem with titanium is that it simply does not give you the most bang for your buck. Why on earth would I want a Ti Litespeed that weighs in at 16.5lbs for $5000-6000 when I can get a carbon fiber Giant TCR at 15.5lbs for $2000-3000? Makes absolutely no sense to those who are aspiring racers without much scratch to throw around. Aka the high school, college, or recent collegiate graduates. Those are the guys who are going to be buying the bikes in the future.

    Titanium manufacturers really messed up by not promoting Ti in the younger generation. If a younger racer never gets a chance to ride Ti when he is starting out or developing, he more than likely won't want to switch to it in the future. I for one will ride Al or C frames for the rest of my racing career.
     
  11. Hookyrider

    Hookyrider New Member

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    I guess this shows when I bought my bikes... a few years ago when Carbon wasn't where it is today... Ti was king, or at least still something that represented the most bang for the buck to me. My road machine weighs in right at 16 pounds, and my Hardtail MTB weighs only a little more than my old Bob Jackson 531C road machine (21.5lbs). I got incredible deals on both or I would have bought something else.


    Truth be told if I were to buy a new bike today, it would have a significant amount of Carbon - much more than just the full carbon fork my present ride has.


    Keep in mind with bike, what represented the most bang for the buck 4 to 6 years ago, will likely not "value" today. Or what today is hot will be in 5 years old hat, and not so hot. Technology and materials have made huge leaps, and will likely continue - especially for CF.


    The other piece to bang for the buck boils down to what feels best for you, and it doesn’t matter what the bike is made of – if you think it rides like crap, is uncomfortable, or the geometry makes you think your going to crash out every time you wipe your nose – then it isn’t going to cut the mustard no matter what the marketing dept. says.

    Also I believe if I had bought a CF bike in 2000 instead of my Tuscany, I’d be needing to replace, or would have replaced the bike already. I’m absolutely sure that at least 2 of the crashes I’ve been in would have totaled my road frame – but that’s only my speculation. As for the MTB I’ve had a couple of friends ruin Al frames from hard riding, and after 8 years, finally I’ve managed to chip some of that heinous yellow power coat on the BB on the Hiwassee.

    Instead of debating the equivilant of "leg grippers rolled up or flat down" – go ride your bike mate and maybe you’ll be able to keep my wheel on the Kuetenberg if you don’t pop a fuse first.

    BTW – Merry Christmas

    HR
     
  12. ToffoIsMe

    ToffoIsMe New Member

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    Titanium frames have a smoother ride because they tend to flex a lot more than CF. On the downside, it doesn't allow you to put as much of your power into your pedal strokes because the frame will absorb some of it as it flexs. CF is much stiffer, so you get more power in your pedal strokes, but it won't be as smooth of a ride and you'll feel many more of the imperfections in a road's pavement.

    Titanium would be good for a serious club rider or a long distance rider since the flex will help reduce fatigue caused by bumps in the road.

    CF is better for racers since it allows more power to be put into the pedal strokes.

    There are people that race on Ti frames, but thats because they prefer Ti. Just ride whatever feels comfortable to you.
     
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