Training Week Ending February 8, 2004

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Swstudio, Feb 7, 2004.

  1. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
    Tags:


  2. Goal Six Foot track - March 13

    Sun 22km 4:45/km Mon 16km 5:00/km Tue am 9km 5:10/km Tue pm 9km 5:20/km Wed 16km 5:00/km Thu 22km
    5:15/km with 6 x 1km repeats at ~3:30 with 90s rest Fri am 9km 4:45/km Fri pm 9km 5:30/km Sat 28km
    5:00/km with 10 hill repeats

    Total 140km

    Previous 2 weeks training were badly disrupted by travel for work. Did get to do some running in
    Kakadu NP in Australia's tropical north which wasn't comfortable, but was an interesting change from
    inner Sydney.

    Sluggish and tired for much of this weeks training. February heat didn't help with 30+C for some
    runs. Got through a decent interval session on Thursday which is comforting and my legs coped well
    with doing ~20km after a hill session yesterday so I guess I'm OK.

    Andrew Taylor
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, SwStudio wrote:
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    First week of speed work after several weeks of easy running.

    M AM 4.6 PM 4.6 T AM Anaerobic repeats 7 reps of 300-400m (5.6 total) PM 5.5 mile run / 3x1 mile
    tempo (10 total) W rest T AM 8 PM 30min xtraining F AM 4 PM 30min xtraining S 12 S some xtraining
    (about 60min)

    Total: 48.8 miles

    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  4. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    SwStudio wrote:
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    Having an easier week after three weeks of pushing my longs runs a bit enthusiastically (17, 20, 25
    miles in the last 3 weeks)

    Mon: Easy recovery run after Saturday's 25 miler. 3.4miles

    Tue: Club 5k time trial 20:13 in blustery conditions. + 5k cooldown.

    Wed: Easy 4.2 miles

    Thu: Club run 4.8 miles

    Fri: dnr

    Sat: LSD (1hr out 58:28 back) 14.6 miles 8:10 mpm avg.

    Sun: dnr

    Total for week 33 miles

    Current goals. 50k race 11th April (sub 4:30), Edinburgh marathon June 13 (sub 3:25)

    Tim

    --
    Remove the obvious to reply by email. Please support rheumatoid arthritis research! Visit
    http://www.justgiving.com/pfp/speyside or http://www,justgiving.com/speyside if you're a UK
    tax payer.
     
  5. ultrajohn1

    ultrajohn1 Guest

    97 f you w
     
  6. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > 97

    What a candy ass. Couldn't you eke out three more miles. ;)

    UJ, looks like Baby Bush is following in daddy's footsteps and a consistent downward slide.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  7. Mark Mauro

    Mark Mauro Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.
    >
    >
    >
    > cheers,

    Goals: Build base for fall marathon, lose another 5 - 10 lbs

    Monday: 6mi (8:30 pace) Tuesday: 12mi (9:10 pace) Wednesday: off Thursday: 7mi (8:30 pace) Friday:
    5mi (8:20 pace) Saturday: 8mi (9:15 pace, snow and slush roads not plowed) Sunday: 4mi (9:00 pace
    recovery run) Total: 42 miles

    Thanks for the new plan Phil. It seems to make a lot of sense. Question. How slow should
    recovery runs be.

    Mark Mauro
     
  8. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Thanks for the new plan Phil. It seems to make a lot of sense. Question. How slow should recovery
    > runs be.

    Like everything else, that depends. If you've run any races recently, you can go to
    http://tinyurl.com/34haz and get some idea of how fast to run your recovery runs as well as any
    other types of runs. For example, if you've run a 43 minute 10K, you should be running your recovery
    runs no faster than 9:13 per mile. If you haven't run any races, maybe it's time to test yourself
    and see where you stand. Most marathon plans call for running a few tune-up races 1 to 2 months
    before the marathon. If the marathon is down the road farther, I'd do a 10K just to get your pacing
    in allignment and predict your possible marathon pace at this point in your training.

    A lot of people, me included, tend to run their recovery runs too hard. This defeats the purpose of
    the recovery run, which is to help you recover from your last hard workout and prepare you for your
    next hard workout. If you run them too hard it can make your hard workouts not as hard as they
    should be. Then all your runs tend to be flat. I have to remind myself of this, because I don't like
    running as slowly as is recommended. While going up a hill this becomes almost a walking pace.

    A heart rate monitor would come in handy to more accurately gauge the correct pace of your recovery
    runs. If you're running in the hills, this becomes difficult to gauge based on effort alone. Pete
    Pfitzinger recommends in his book, "Advanced Marathoning," that recovery runs should be run at less
    than 75% of maximal heart rate and less than 70% of heart rate reserve.

    Here are some other recommended paces from the book: Long (17+ miles): 10-20% slower than
    marathon race pace Medium-Long: 10-20% slower than marathon race pace General Aerobic: 10 miles
    or less at a steady pace Lactate Threshold: 15K to half marathon race pace VO2 Max: 3-5K race
    pace Recovery: < 75% MHR

    -Phil
     
  9. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

  10. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    goals: get the ITB 100% healed (or as close as possible) while
    finishing up marathon training. Upcoming race: marathon Feb 22.

    M: dnr
    N: 2mi treadmill (plus 6.5 elliptical)
    O: 8mi on track incl [email protected], sort of
    P: 3mi TM (plus 5.5 ET)
    Q: 8mi easy on road Sa: 4mi TM (plus 4.5 ET) Su: 20.5mi

    total: 45.5 miles running, 16.5 elliptical

    Funny that 45 miles now seems like a light week :) Coach hooked me up with a guy who does
    ultrasound, also suggested substituting some elliptical-trainer work for some of the running miles.
    Between the ultrasound and the low-impact stuff, *something* seems to be helping a lot. Running
    feels good again. This week I'll continue to baby the leg somewhat. Then it'll be taper time.

    Good week all

    Karen
     
  11. On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:10:44 GMT, joe positive <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Coach hooked me up with a guy who does ultrasound

    Coach would do better by keeping you injury-free to begin with.
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    > [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > Lactate Threshold: 15K to half marathon race pace

    I take this as a sign that like Daniels, these guys are targetting fairly well trained runners (to
    put it mildly). A rule of thumbs for LT is the fastest pace that you can hold for 1 hour, so for me
    that's about 15k pace. For someone who runs 10k in 50 min to 1hr, 10k race pace is reasonable for
    tempo runs. If you can run a HM at LT, you're probably an elite.

    LT can often be a lower intensity than this pace (max 1hr pace) even for experienced runners. For
    example, r.r regular Sam's lab tested LT is about 10k pace [http://tinyurl.com/23m7z].

    The more reading I do, the more inclined I am to avoid being overly precise about LT. Take a look at
    Andy Hass's (google for "tempo Andy Hass") and Sam's posts (Sam LT group:rec.running) on the
    subject. Daniels is almost religiously precise about LT pace and argues that minor deviations from
    this are "junk training". But I have seen little evidence that this is really the case, and many
    runners have succesfully used "tempo runs" as hard steady-state runs of 20-40 min duration, without
    being overly concerned about whether they are "really" running at "LT" (whatever that means).

    One experience I had with "tempo runs" is that I did some with a training group at a much higher
    speed than my supposed theoretical "tempo pace", but the runs "felt right". It turned out that race
    performances shortly after these runs indicated that the tempo pace I'd picked by feel was very
    close to the "theoretically correct" pace.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  13. Mark Mauro

    Mark Mauro Guest

    On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 11:05:36 -0500, Phil M. wrote
    (in message <[email protected]>):

    > [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Goals: Build base for fall marathon
    >
    > Which one?
    >
    > -Phil

    Either Clarence Demar (NH) at the end of September or Baystate (MA) in October.

    Mark Mauro
     
  14. Ben Blaukopf

    Ben Blaukopf Guest

    "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A heart rate monitor would come in handy to more accurately gauge the correct pace of your
    > recovery runs. If you're running in the hills, this becomes difficult to gauge based on effort
    > alone. Pete Pfitzinger recommends in his book, "Advanced Marathoning," that recovery runs should
    > be run at less than 75% of maximal heart rate and less than 70% of heart rate reserve.

    ?? That sounds pretty high for a recovery run. Most things I've seen suggest <60% of working heart
    rate for a recovery run. 75% would, at least for me, be significantly faster than a recovery run.

    Ben
     
  15. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:20:43 +0000, "In another life, when we are both
    cats" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:10:44 GMT, joe positive <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Coach hooked me up with a guy who does ultrasound
    >
    >Coach would do better by keeping you injury-free to begin with.

    Coach is not a nursemaid.

    I let myself get injured because I ignored some warning signs.

    Karen
     
  16. On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:43:48 GMT, joe positive <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I let myself get injured because I ignored some warning signs.

    Idiot.
     
  17. Goal: Week 2 of taper for Feb. 15 marathon.

    M: DNR Tu: 7 w/ 3x100m strides (would have done more but I forgot till I was nearly home)
    N: 6.2 including 2x1600m at 5K pace -- intended to do 3 repeats but between sore leg (adductor &
    hamstring) and EIA, packed it in early. Th: DNR
    O: 5 easy w/ 6 x 100m strides Sa: DNR Su: 12

    Total 30.2 miles.

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  18. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    "Ben Blaukopf" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    gui.server.ntli.net:

    >
    > "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> A heart rate monitor would come in handy to more accurately gauge the correct pace of your
    >> recovery runs. If you're running in the hills, this becomes difficult to gauge based on effort
    >> alone. Pete Pfitzinger recommends in his book, "Advanced Marathoning," that recovery runs should
    >> be run at less than 75% of maximal heart rate and less than 70% of heart rate reserve.
    >
    > ?? That sounds pretty high for a recovery run. Most things I've seen suggest <60% of working heart
    > rate for a recovery run. 75% would, at least for me, be significantly faster than a recovery run.

    I think that if you keep it under 75, especially going up hills, this could be OK. Then keep it
    closer to your range on the flats.

    Thanks for pointing that out.

    -Phil
     
  19. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 20:07:34 +0000, "In another life, when we are both
    cats" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:43:48 GMT, joe positive <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I let myself get injured because I ignored some warning signs.
    >
    >Idiot.

    Agreed.
     
  20. Ryan Pearman

    Ryan Pearman Guest

    Goal: Boston! (sub 3)
    M: dnr
    N: 7mi, ~7:00/mi.
    O: 7mi, tempo. 7min 7:30/mile, 15min 6:18/mile, 5min 7:30/mile, 10min 6:18/mile, rest 8:00/mile
    P: 7mi, 7:10/mi
    Q: 6mi, 7:30/mi
    R: 22mi, ~7:00/mi Su: 4mi easy

    Total: 53 miles.

    --Ryan
     
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