Trek 7500 hybrid frame size - standover question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Abc, Jun 28, 2003.

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  1. Abc

    Abc Guest

    Last summer, I purchased a Trek 7500 hybrid with a 22.5 inch frame size (largest size available)
    made out of Alpha SL Aluminum.

    I've had this bicycle for 11 months, but for various reasons, I have not ridden it at all - yet.
    That is about to change in the next week.

    I am 6'2", big body frame, 250 pounds, and wear 32 inch inseam slacks. I have a long torso
    (headroom always a problem when buying cars!) and my arms are short compared to my torso. (My hands
    hang down at my sides at least a few inches less than most people - which is why I play golf with
    extra long clubs.)

    But I am concerned in that when standing over the bike, I only have an inch of clearance - if that.
    (And that is with shoes on - if I'm barefoot, my nuts are just barely resting on the top tube!)

    I'm concerned that at some point, I'm going to stop the bike and one time will be "singing soprano".
    But the larger frame SUPPOSEDLY would be good for my extra long torso.

    I don't plan a lot of offroad riding with this bike.

    My 22.5 inch frame has a standover of 32.4", horizontal top tube of 22.9", head angle of 71.5
    degrees, wheelbase of 42.1" The 20.0 inch frame has a standover of 30.5", horizontal top tube of
    22.2", head angle of 70.5 degrees, wheelbase of 41.8"

    QUESTION: Is there a good reason to bring the 22.5" bike back after 11 months with no miles on it
    and attempt to get the 20.0" frame size before putting any miles on my 22.5" bike?

    Thanks in advance! :)

    Bud South Bend, Indiana, USA
     
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  2. A shy person wrote:

    > Last summer, I purchased a Trek 7500 hybrid with a 22.5 inch frame size=

    > (largest size available) made out of Alpha SL Aluminum.
    >=20
    > I am 6'2", big body frame, 250 pounds, and wear 32 inch inseam slacks.=
    I
    > have a long torso (headroom always a problem when buying cars!) and my =
    arms
    > are short compared to my torso. (My hands hang down at my sides at lea=
    st a
    > few inches less than most people - which is why I play golf with extra =
    long
    > clubs.)
    >=20
    > But I am concerned in that when standing over the bike, I only have an =
    inch
    > of clearance - if that. (And that is with shoes on - if I'm barefoot, =
    my
    > nuts are just barely resting on the top tube!)
    >=20
    > I'm concerned that at some point, I'm going to stop the bike and one ti=
    me
    > will be "singing soprano". But the larger frame SUPPOSEDLY would be go=
    od
    > for my extra long torso.
    >=20
    > I don't plan a lot of offroad riding with this bike.
    >=20
    > My 22.5 inch frame has a standover of 32.4", horizontal top tube of 22=
    =2E9",
    > head angle of 71.5 degrees, wheelbase of 42.1" The 20.0 inch frame has a standover of 30.5",
    > horizontal top tube of 22=
    =2E2",
    > head angle of 70.5 degrees, wheelbase of 41.8"
    >=20
    > QUESTION: Is there a good reason to bring the 22.5" bike back after 1=
    1
    > months with no miles on it and attempt to get the 20.0" frame size befo=
    re
    > putting any miles on my 22.5" bike?

    Definitely not. It sounds like you got the right size the first time=20 around. Since you're not
    going to be riding off road, you don't need a=20 lot of standover clearance (but I'd advise against
    riding barefoot!)

    I often fit riders with proportions like yours on bikes with minimal=20 standover clearance,
    because that's the way to get the right top tube=20 length. Standover height has nothing to do with
    ride comfort.

    See also http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-sizing.html for more detail on thi=
    s.

    Sheldon "Short Torso, Long Lets, Long Seatpost, But That's Me, Not You"=20 Brown
    +----------------------------------------------+
    | I will be making my grand opera debut in a | Concert Performance of Bizet=92s Carmen | July
    | 31/August 1, M.I.T. Kresge Auditorium | Cambridge, Mass http://web.mit.edu/gsp/www/ |
    +----------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "ABC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Last summer, I purchased a Trek 7500 hybrid with a 22.5 inch frame size (largest size available)
    > made out of Alpha SL Aluminum.
    >
    > I've had this bicycle for 11 months, but for various reasons, I have not ridden it at all - yet.
    > That is about to change in the next week.
    >
    > I am 6'2", big body frame, 250 pounds, and wear 32 inch inseam slacks. I have a long torso
    > (headroom always a problem when buying cars!) and my
    arms
    > are short compared to my torso. (My hands hang down at my sides at least
    a
    > few inches less than most people - which is why I play golf with extra
    long
    > clubs.)
    >
    > But I am concerned in that when standing over the bike, I only have an
    inch
    > of clearance - if that. (And that is with shoes on - if I'm barefoot, my nuts are just barely
    > resting on the top tube!)
    >
    > I'm concerned that at some point, I'm going to stop the bike and one time will be "singing
    > soprano". But the larger frame SUPPOSEDLY would be good for my extra long torso.
    >
    > I don't plan a lot of offroad riding with this bike.
    >
    > My 22.5 inch frame has a standover of 32.4", horizontal top tube of
    22.9",
    > head angle of 71.5 degrees, wheelbase of 42.1" The 20.0 inch frame has a standover of 30.5",
    > horizontal top tube of
    23.2",
    > head angle of 70.5 degrees, wheelbase of 41.8"
    >
    > QUESTION: Is there a good reason to bring the 22.5" bike back after 11 months with no miles on it
    > and attempt to get the 20.0" frame size before putting any miles on my 22.5" bike?

    I don't know the answer to your specific question but I did own a "too large" bike when that was
    the fashion.

    It would be a rare event indeed where that would be an actual problem. Most of the time one steps to
    the pavement with one foot, leavng the other in a toeclip (or otherwise still on a pedal) , the bike
    leaning from the vertical. I'm sure many r.b.t. readers of a certain age will have had direct
    experience here as well.

    Try a ride around your neighborhood (unless that entails riding in mud or on an expressway) Ride
    back to your bike dealer and ask the same questions you asked us but with your bike at hand. See
    if they want to reconsider their fit recommendation in light of your comments. If you do decide
    it's not an optimal fit, the delay shouldn't matter much - - but it sure will in August when 2004
    bikes come out.

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
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