Turnover worn chain for longer life?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John Crankshaw, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was tight
    like new again.

    Haven't tried it. What do you think?
     
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  2. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I think - without measuring/observing - that there will be some difference in the 'elongation'. But
    "tight like new"?

    "John Crankshaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    | A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was
    | tight like new again.
    |
    | Haven't tried it. What do you think?
    |
    |
     
  3. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    John Crankshaw wrote:
    > A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was
    > tight like new again.
    >
    > Haven't tried it. What do you think?

    I put a half-twist in my chains and reconnect them like a Moebius strip. Chain wear is evened out
    and since the wear surface is doubled, so is lifespan.
     
  4. LOL!!!

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    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > John Crankshaw wrote:
    > > A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was
    > > tight like new again.
    > >
    > > Haven't tried it. What do you think?
    >
    > I put a half-twist in my chains and reconnect them like a Moebius strip. Chain wear is evened out
    > and since the wear surface is doubled, so is lifespan.
    >
    >
    >

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  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    John Crankshaw writes:

    > A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was
    > tight like new again.

    Elongation is measured on the straight run of the chain and that doesn't change when you turn the
    the chain. It is the pitch of the incoming straight chain as it rolls onto sprockets that is the
    problem and this remains unchanged regardless of orientation.

    I think avoiding this rider's "good tips" would be a prudent measure.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 13:17:01 GMT, "John Crankshaw"
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >A riding buddy says that when his chain got to 1/16" elongation he flipped it over and it was tight
    >like new again.
    >
    >Haven't tried it. What do you think?

    I think your acquaintance needs to take a second look at his chain. It's still worn out.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  7. On the older, UniGlide cogs, you could flip them over to prolong their existance, because only one
    edgee of the teeth sees wear fron chain contact.

    I don't think the same applies for the chains.

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  8. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    ? clean chain twice with solvent.clean clean. flex chain sideways and listen for silica
    disintegration. oil chain in bath. hang chain from hook.allows penetration.dry chain in heat source
    before using. replace most slightly worn cassette sprocket cog with new spare, often the middle cog
    be aware of what cog (s) yawl ridin' in and move to other cogs. spread the wear. turn the chain over
    as an experiment. it may be that a slightly worn in elliptical and conelike chain run in a reverse
    direction will: 1:skip and 2) wear the cogs and CR faster than ... but its allexperimental. doing it
    and observing the resul;ts may tyeach more than the associated immediate costs involved. put the
    removable chain link back on exactly as it came off using coloured paperclips

    for example: how many oil changes and filters equal a rebuild given yawl doin' the works
    installation et. al. yawlself?
     
  9. Mark Buell

    Mark Buell Guest

    Wahl, I hope thas all jus tung in cheek, as they say.
    Howevah, I will say, in an OT sort o' way, thet 56K miles on
    my VW saw a rebuild with religious oil and filter changes.
    As you infer, very expensive DIY oil changes. On the other
    hand, several other gasoline powered, and human powered
    vehicles have relied on my sometimes less than stellar care,
    and have survived for many many moons. I think we ken rule
    out the possibility that the DIY approach is a hidden cost.

    Cheers, and all in good fun; Mark

    If'n you reaally want my reply to pull out the stops
    mastopsrk_bustopsell(at)yahoo.com

    > paperclips
    >
    > for example: how many oil changes and filters equal a
    > rebuild given yawl doin' the works installation et. al.
    > yawlself?
     
  10. Robrac

    Robrac Guest

    The old air cooled VW engine had a design flaw, the oil
    cooler blocked the airflow to number three cylinder, which
    caused the exhaust valve to burn. The only way to save the
    valve on a stock engine was to adjust the valves
    religiously. In addition to the oil and air filters, without
    the valve adjustment you were in deep doo doo, and the
    problem was that the valves had to be adjusted with the
    engine cold. Which meant that the dealers either spent the
    extra time and made certain that the engine was cold, or
    they did a poor job. The best time was to do the DIY work
    first thing in the morning, when the engine was stone cold.

    The solution was to install an external oil cooler, and the
    do it yourself ers would do just that when they were
    rebuilding the engine.

    Now, if you want to talk about rebuilding the carb, well,
    that was fun too.

    Anyway, the VW engine has no correlation to a bicycle, and
    there are fewer major design flaws on a bicycle.

    rob

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 17:25:37 -0800,
    [email protected] (Mark Buell) wrote:

    >Wahl, I hope thas all jus tung in cheek, as they say.
    >Howevah, I will say, in an OT sort o' way, thet 56K miles
    >on my VW saw a rebuild with religious oil and filter
    >changes. As you infer, very expensive DIY oil changes. On
    >the other hand, several other gasoline powered, and human
    >powered vehicles have relied on my sometimes less than
    >stellar care, and have survived for many many moons. I
    >think we ken rule out the possibility that the DIY approach
    >is a hidden cost.
    >
    >Cheers, and all in good fun; Mark
    >
    >If'n you reaally want my reply to pull out the stops
    >mastopsrk_bustopsell(at)yahoo.com
    >
    >> paperclips
    >>
    >> for example: how many oil changes and filters equal a
    >> rebuild given yawl doin' the works installation et. al.
    >> yawlself?
     
  11. Mark Buell

    Mark Buell Guest

    [email protected] says...

    > Anyway, the VW engine has no correlation to a bicycle, and
    > there are fewer major design flaws on a bicycle.
    >
    > rob
    As to being OT I plead guilty, sir. And that there is no
    correlation as well. However, it was

    > >Cheers, and all in good fun;

    c ya Mark
     
  12. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    robrac <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > The old air cooled VW engine had a design flaw, the oil
    > cooler blocked the airflow to number three cylinder,
    > which caused the exhaust valve to burn. The only way to
    > save the valve on a stock engine was to adjust the valves
    > religiously. In addition to the oil and air filters,
    > without the valve adjustment you were in deep doo doo,
    > and the problem was that the valves had to be adjusted
    > with the engine cold. Which meant that the dealers either
    > spent the extra time and made certain that the engine was
    > cold, or they did a poor job. The best time was to do the
    > DIY work first thing in the morning, when the engine was
    > stone cold.
    >
    > The solution was to install an external oil cooler, and
    > the do it yourself ers would do just that when they were
    > rebuilding the engine.
    >
    > Now, if you want to talk about rebuilding the carb, well,
    > that was fun too.
    >
    > Anyway, the VW engine has no correlation to a bicycle, and
    > there are fewer major design flaws on a bicycle.
    >
    > rob
    >

    Dear Rob,

    If burning VW valves interest you, this should make your
    day:

    http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/baugher_us/b029-
    09.html

    Search for "115" in this lengthy page about B-29 bombers,
    and you'll get a somewhat sanitized explanation for the B-
    29's terrible loss rate and for the mountains of discarded
    engines on islands in the Pacific. (Similar engine fires
    doomed the first test B-29 over Seattle, where the 115
    degree ground temperatures accused of being the culprit in
    India are unknown.)

    When a B-29's valves failed, its magnesium engine cases
    caught fire and burned through its main wing spar in less
    than a minute.

    In case there turns out to be a correlation to bicycles, I
    have resolved to check the Schrader valves on my Fury
    Roadmaster before every ride.

    Carl Fogel
     
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