Two-bicycle, side-by-side, quadricycle tandem

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Moosh:), May 10, 2003.

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  1. Moosh:)

    Moosh:) Guest

    I'm thinking of buying two cheap ladies mountain bikes and lashing them together like the "granny
    bike". My better half can't ride a bike, and my arferitus makes getting on a permanently upright
    bloke's bike impossible (you should see me getting on and off my MTB :) Anyway, I was thinking of 2'
    2" between the frames (leave 2" between the handlebars anyway) and I haven't a clue yet what
    Ackerman angle to incorporate into the steering (around 40 degrees between the two steering arms at
    straight ahead?) What minimum specs should I look for in the two bikes? I suspect alloy rims,
    stainless spokes, and would steel or ally frame be more robust where I clamp the cross ties on the
    headstock and rear downstays? Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

    Moosh:)
     
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  2. Moosh:)

    Moosh:) Guest

    On Sat, 10 May 2003 15:20:49 GMT, "Moosh:)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    Apologies for the multiposting -- my poor old Agent is past its useby date and appeared to stall
    several times without posting.

    Moosh:)
     
  3. "Moosh:)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm thinking of buying two cheap ladies mountain bikes and lashing them together like the
    > "granny bike".

    The best recommendation I can give here is to stay well away from four-wheel rigs and avoid
    home-engineering. A quadricycle brings in a whole host of compliations concerning steering control
    and angles, tyre/road contact on irregular surfaces without full suspension, respective drive power
    of two riders and turning forces, not to mention the structural security of the connecting members.

    > My better half can't ride a bike, and my arferitus makes getting on a permanently upright bloke's
    > bike impossible

    Look into the options of:

    - Viewpoint Tandem maybe able to set something up that meets your needs www.bilenky.com/viewpnt.html
    - Greenspeed (in Ferntree Gully, Victoria) make very cool tandem recumbent trikes
    www.greenspeed..com.au/tandem.htm

    Neither of these are cut-price options - in fact a good financial arrangement would be worthwhile,
    but you will find the cycling much happier and will arrive alive.

    Cheers Peter
     
  4. Another view on the Viewpoint, including a semi-independent drivetrain.
    http://www.bilenky.com/daveductorarticle.htm

    You maybe able to talk to them about altered steering to provide for a
    recumbent captain, with your partner as an upright stoker. Just an idea.

    Cheers Peter
     
  5. Moosh:)

    Moosh:) Guest

    On Sun, 11 May 2003 22:53:09 +1000, "Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Moosh:)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm thinking of buying two cheap ladies mountain bikes and lashing them together like the
    >> "granny bike".
    >
    >The best recommendation I can give here is to stay well away from four-wheel rigs and avoid
    >home-engineering. A quadricycle brings in a whole host of compliations concerning steering control
    >and angles, tyre/road contact on irregular surfaces without full suspension, respective drive power
    >of two riders and turning forces, not to mention the structural security of the connecting members.
    >
    >> My better half can't ride a bike, and my arferitus makes getting on a permanently upright bloke's
    >> bike impossible
    >
    >Look into the options of:
    >
    >- Viewpoint Tandem maybe able to set something up that meets your needs
    > www.bilenky.com/viewpnt.html
    >- Greenspeed (in Ferntree Gully, Victoria) make very cool tandem recumbent trikes
    > www.greenspeed..com.au/tandem.htm
    >
    >Neither of these are cut-price options - in fact a good financial arrangement would be worthwhile,
    >but you will find the cycling much happier and will arrive alive.

    Thanks for that Peter. If only I had the funds :)

    I'm thinking $400 max and these are over $8000.

    Then there is one tiny point. The side by side will likely get away with an occasional train trip in
    Perth, whereas these alternatives would likely not.

    I take your two major points. About four rigid wheels on uneven ground, as we are near enough to 60
    and not wanting to use anything but good paved cycle paths at gentle speeds, I suspect this will not
    be an insurmountable problem.

    The home engineering point is valid, and I usually tend to overengineer my projects. I have
    reasonable workshop facilities. I understand the braking and cornering stresses on any linkage, and
    will make this extraordinarily rigid.

    The gearing and braking will remain independent. The steering will be linked with a tie rod that I
    will finely adjust from an initial Ackerman angle that I have found for setting up three wheelers.

    There is a Canadian kit for joining two bikes, so it must work to some extent. If it doesn't then it
    can be dismantled and the original bikes sold.

    I would appreciate still any further traps or pitfalls that you or anyone can suggest. I'm sure
    there are things I haven't thought of yet :)

    The granny bike is here:

    http://www.thegrannybike.com/

    Moosh:)
     
  6. Moosh:)

    Moosh:) Guest

    On Thu, 15 May 2003 09:51:48 +1000, "Cody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> The best recommendation I can give here is to stay well away from
    >four-wheel
    >> rigs and avoid home-engineering. A quadricycle brings in a whole host of
    >
    >I always liked the sidecar arrangement I saw years ago in the Philippines (I think it was). Dead
    >simple to build; The sidecar wheel was in line with the rear wheel of the bike so steering wasn't a
    >problem and the sidecar could have a seat for one or two or used for a load.
    >
    >Not that this has anything to do with the subject.
    >
    >

    Of course it does, Cody. Thanks for your thoughts. I was contemplating something like that, but the
    stoker needs to bloodywell stoke, Dammit! :)
     
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