Usefullness of Barnett's or UBI training?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Eric St. Mary, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. Eric St. Mary

    Eric St. Mary New Member

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    I am curious to, as if attending Barnett's or UBI training and certification seminars actually provides any gusto for getting a job as a shop mechanic. Whether it does or not, are there actually jobs out there to be had and what is the pay. Would you also please state whether or not you have attended one, and if so were you pleased with it.

    Thanks,
    Eric
     
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  2. cycleboy

    cycleboy Guest

    I have not attended any of these seminars.

    However, I'm sure any formal training won't hurt your chances but I suspect that a lot of bike shop jobs are obtained thru informal channels. Friend of a friend who works there, word of mouth, somebody hanging around when someone quits, etc. Large shops and chains are likely to have more formal application procedures.

    If you want to work in a bike shop, get to know the owner(s) and let them know that you are interested. Be prepared to tell them what maintenance procedures you can do and do well. Be ready to learn and be sure to project a good attitude toward the work and THE CUSTOMER!

    People do this because they love cycling and want to be around it so pay is not going to be high. If you spend a lot of money on your cycling you may get the benefit of an employee discount which is the same as pay.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Eric-<< I am curious to, as if attending Barnett's or UBI training and certification seminars
    actually provides any gusto for getting a job as a shop mechanic. Whether it does or not, are there
    actually jobs out there to be had and what is the pay. >><BR><BR>

    Regardless of the schools you attend, you will have to demonstrate your skills, mostly by building a
    bike(altho I had a oral exam when I ran a shop).

    If satisfactory, you will start by building bikes and rise in the wrenching organization. Keep your
    sense of humor and don't expect to get paid very well. Maybe $10/ hr for a very experienced wrench.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 22:10:13 GMT, Eric St. Mary
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >I am curious to, as if attending Barnett's or UBI training and certification seminars actually
    >provides any gusto for getting a job as a shop mechanic. Whether it does or not, are there actually
    >jobs out there to be had and what is the pay. Would you also please state whether or not you have
    >attended one, and if so were you pleased with it.

    I haven't worked as a professional bike mechanic, but I've been a professional mechanic and shop
    foreman in the automotive field, which is a trifle more involved. Schools can't substitute for
    talent and experience; they can jump-start the process of getting the latter, but given that bike
    shops don't pay all that well, I question the cost-effectiveness of formal training for someone who
    is speculatively looking to get into the field. It would be wise to consult with some of the local
    bike shops about the real-world pay rates and job prospects before making your decision, but my gut
    instinct is that you're better off looking for a 9-to-5 in another field and keeping bikes as a
    hobby that you can then continue to *enjoy*.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    Eric St. Mary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I am curious to, as if attending Barnett's or UBI training and certification seminars actually
    >provides any gusto for getting a job as a shop mechanic. Whether it does or not, are there actually
    >jobs out there to be had and what is the pay. Would you also please state whether or not you have
    >attended one, and if so were you pleased with it.

    I went through the UBI program in 1988 and got a job at a shop the day I graduated.

    I don't know much about the job situation now but I found a different career because bike shop jobs
    pay crap and often have poor benefits. There are some exceptions but you'll be lucky if you can pick
    and choose.

    --Paul
     
  6. Vee

    Vee Guest

    Eric St. Mary <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am curious to, as if attending Barnett's or UBI training and certification seminars actually
    > provides any gusto for getting a job as a shop mechanic. Whether it does or not, are there
    > actually jobs out there to be had and what is the pay. Would you also please state whether or not
    > you have attended one, and if so were you pleased with it.

    I would definitely advise you, if possible, to get a taste for the job before giving John Barnett
    lots and lots of your money. I have three friends who have done Barnett's Bicycle Repair and
    Overhaul program. Two already had a couple years of bike shop experience and were essentially
    seeking more pay and prestige. The third was very mechanically proficient but he had no bike shop
    experience. The first two found a bit more pay and prestige, but not enough to keep them in the
    industry for very long- they simply wanted more than the job usually offers. The third, who just
    wanted to work on bikes, got hired quickly by a shop and has been working as a mechanic for the last
    five or six years. All three found the Barnett's program at least somewhat worthwhile, but it won't
    make you a happy career mechanic if you don't enjoy fixing bikes and working with customers in their
    own right. Also, even if you go to Barnett's, it will take you a few years to learn what you need to
    know, and to become efficient enough, to make it worthwhile for somebody to pay you well. In the
    meantime, you'd better be content with mediocre pay ($7-10) and ample opportunity to learn about
    bikes and people. I didn't have much trouble getting a job assembling new bikes in a shop, despite
    my lack of experience and formal certification, but I was making little more than minimum wage when
    I got started.

    -Vee
     
  7. Eric St. Mary

    Eric St. Mary New Member

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    I have built quite a few bikes, none in a shop though and I'm not talking about Huffies. I maintain, rebuild, and build bikes for my friends, local club riders, and myself. My mechanical skills are excellent and I have built about a dozen wheels too. I'm not looking to make a career just, something to earn some extra regular cash while in grad school. The thing is UBI now accepts the GI Bill and I wouldn't have to pay for it (well I guess I did with six years of my life). I just wouldn't want to waste my time attending the school and paying for a plane ticket, if it wouldn't help me land a job. I've heard that the work is quite seasonal, which would work out great. Is that correct? Peter could you give me an example of what you oral quiz consisted of; I'm guessing it couldn't be to difficult, we are talking about bikes not space craft.

    Cheers,
    Eric
     
  8. Eric-<< The thing is UBI now accepts the GI Bill and I wouldn't have to pay for it (well I guess I
    did with six years of my life). >><BR><BR>

    Thought your era got 60% paid, not the whole deal(I still have VietNam era GI bill, never
    have used it).

    Eric-<< My mechanical skills are excellent >><BR><BR> << Peter could you give me an example of what
    you oral quiz consisted of; I'm guessing it couldn't be to difficult, we are talking about bikes not
    space craft >><BR><BR>

    Things like dimensions, things that if ya didn't know could goon up a bike. Differences in Italian
    and English threading? Sizes of headsets and fork diameters. What's compatible with what, cranks and
    BBs. What's compatible with what, shifters, ders, cranks, etc. Wheel lacing patterns, ball beraring
    sizes and applications. Just take the front of the bike to the rear and be able to demonstrate how
    each thing workls together, raod and MTB.

    Find a shop that will let ya build a bike. Insist that you do a complete job, not a fast one. Insist
    on doing things like adding grease to hubs and HS', taking the tires off and actually truing,
    tensioning, dishing, rounding and stress relieveing the wheels.

    If you have a fair amount of mechanical knowledge and can think things thru, you should be able to
    find a seasonal wrenching job. Now's the time to look.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. Eric St. Mary

    Eric St. Mary New Member

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    Peter Wrote "Thought your era got 60% paid, not the whole deal(I still have VietNam era GI bill, never
    have used it)."

    It is $985 a month for 36 months for full-time university, plus a extra $150 a month from the "Top Up" program. For "high cost, short term, highly skilled training" or some similar BS the have just changed it to cover 100% and UBI is onboard. Pretty nice actually.

    Your test sounds pretty easy; as long I didn't have to name internal part numbers from the old Sturmey-Archer hubs or something similar I would do well.

    Be Well,
    Eric
     
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