Bicycle for college?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bluesman5920, Jun 1, 2003.

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  1. Bluesman5920

    Bluesman5920 Guest

    I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State University). I went to my local bike shop
    and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought this
    very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.

    A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need like
    a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a bike to
    college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could I do to
    secure it?
     
    Tags:


  2. On 1 Jun 2003 14:25:08 -0700, [email protected] (bluesman5920) wrote:

    >I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State University). I went to my local bike shop
    >and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought this
    >very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.
    >
    >A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    >like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a bike
    >to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could I do to
    >secure it?

    [Note: I'm on a different continent. Not everything in my experience necessarily applies]

    Lock it, and for god's sake don't overclean. It's fine to clean the moving parts, chain, axles, and
    other bearings, but otherwise, the more mud & rust you're dragging along the better, for camouflage.
    But the most important thing is and remains lock discipline. Summary: get a lock that an average
    thief can't open in three seconds flat. That category includes most chain locks and locks that have
    a separate padlock, plus the cheaper and midrange variants of cable locks. A good quality U-lock
    works fine, but the cheap ones suck. Two locks are much better than the sum of their parts. Locking
    your bike to the "solid world", so that the pro thieves don't just drive a truck up and lift a dozen
    bikes into them, for cracking their locks at leisure, also a good idea.

    The best lock IMHO is a chain lock by Cyclops[1]. The difference with regular chain locks is that
    these are through and through hardened steel, where most chains are either mild steel or mild steel
    with a hardened outer layer. Boltcutters just curl up and die when they see these babies.

    Whether you can find those in the US would be a major stumbling block, though.

    Ring locks[2] are extremely convenient, because they screw onto the bike and thus you don't have
    to worry about having it with you, or storing it somewhewre on the bike after you unlock it --
    just insert key, twist, and you can go. I have no idea if that kind of lock is commonly available
    in the US, though, and don't get one any cheaper than that Axa model from the footnote. The Axa
    SL-7 is already much better, and not much more expensive. When you leave your bike in a high risk
    area for longer periods of time, two locks are the way to go, one of which should lock your bike
    to the bike rack.

    If you get good locks (and expect to spend $50 or so on locks, if the bike doesn't come with
    anything decent), and use them, and don't leave the keys in (my personal bane -- lost 3 or 4 bikes
    that way), then you should be okay.

    If you want to be frugal (and/or spend the rest on beer), not worry about your bike much, and be
    able to replace it fairly cheaply, get an old clunker. But do look for one with a 3speed hub,
    especially if you've got hills. I just bought myself a new one last week, for about $150. Good steel
    frame, 3speed, drum brakes, baggage rack, lighting system, manufactured '85, all bearings adjusted
    properly, but slightly rusty and unsightly.

    Here in the Netherlands, you can leave such a bike with just a ring lock without much trouble.
    Leaving a bike without *any* locks means screaming at the top of your voice "Hey, drunk fratboys!
    Free transportation back to home!", even aside from 'real' thieves.

    Jasper

    [1] http://www.armada-bike-security.com/

    [2]http://www.wheel2wheel4bikes.com/products.php?mcat=2&brand=27&scat=93&prodid=158
     
  3. Eric Vey

    Eric Vey Guest

    --get an old clunker. But do look for one with a 3speed hub, especially if you've got hills. I just
    bought myself a new one last week, for about $150. Good steel frame, 3speed, drum brakes, baggage
    rack, lighting system, manufactured '85, all bearings adjusted properly, but slightly rusty and
    unsightly.--

    This is what I did when I was in college. I bought an old 3 speed for $35. I kept it looking bad,
    but running good.

    I was pretty good about keeping it locked, but one night the rack got hit by "professionals" all
    aged under 18. The whole rack gets cleared out except for mine and a single speed . . . I had
    forgotten to lock up that night.

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 1 Jun 2003 14:25:08 -0700, [email protected] (bluesman5920) wrote:
    >
    > >I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State
    University).
    > > I went to my local bike shop and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the
    > > college atmosphere, I thought this very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.
    > >
    > >A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    > >like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a
    > >bike to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could
    > >I do to secure it?
    >
    > [Note: I'm on a different continent. Not everything in my experience necessarily applies]
    >
    > Lock it, and for god's sake don't overclean. It's fine to clean the
    moving
    > parts, chain, axles, and other bearings, but otherwise, the more mud & rust you're dragging along
    > the better, for camouflage. But the most important thing is and remains lock discipline. Summary:
    > get a lock
    that
    > an average thief can't open in three seconds flat. That category
    includes
    > most chain locks and locks that have a separate padlock, plus the
    cheaper
    > and midrange variants of cable locks. A good quality U-lock works
    fine,
    > but the cheap ones suck. Two locks are much better than the sum of
    their
    > parts. Locking your bike to the "solid world", so that the pro thieves don't just drive a truck up
    > and lift a dozen bikes into them, for
    cracking
    > their locks at leisure, also a good idea.
    >
    > The best lock IMHO is a chain lock by Cyclops[1]. The difference with regular chain locks is that
    > these are through and through hardened
    steel,
    > where most chains are either mild steel or mild steel with a hardened outer layer. Boltcutters
    > just curl up and die when they see these
    babies.
    >
    > Whether you can find those in the US would be a major stumbling block, though.
    >
    > Ring locks[2] are extremely convenient, because they screw onto the
    bike
    > and thus you don't have to worry about having it with you, or storing
    it
    > somewhewre on the bike after you unlock it -- just insert key, twist,
    and
    > you can go. I have no idea if that kind of lock is commonly available
    in
    > the US, though, and don't get one any cheaper than that Axa model from
    the
    > footnote. The Axa SL-7 is already much better, and not much more expensive. When you leave your
    > bike in a high risk area for longer
    periods
    > of time, two locks are the way to go, one of which should lock your
    bike
    > to the bike rack.
    >
    > If you get good locks (and expect to spend $50 or so on locks, if the
    bike
    > doesn't come with anything decent), and use them, and don't leave the
    keys
    > in (my personal bane -- lost 3 or 4 bikes that way), then you should
    be
    > okay.
    >
    > If you want to be frugal (and/or spend the rest on beer), not worry
    about
    > your bike much, and be able to replace it fairly cheaply, get an old clunker. But do look for one
    > with a 3speed hub, especially if you've
    got
    > hills. I just bought myself a new one last week, for about $150. Good steel frame, 3speed, drum
    > brakes, baggage rack, lighting system, manufactured '85, all bearings adjusted properly, but
    > slightly rusty
    and
    > unsightly.
    >
    > Here in the Netherlands, you can leave such a bike with just a ring
    lock
    > without much trouble. Leaving a bike without *any* locks means
    screaming
    > at the top of your voice "Hey, drunk fratboys! Free transportation
    back to
    > home!", even aside from 'real' thieves.
    >
    >
    > Jasper
    >
    > [1] http://www.armada-bike-security.com/
    >
    > [2]
    >
    http://www.wheel2wheel4bikes.com/products.php?mcat=2&brand=27&scat=93&prodid=158
     
  4. Tanya Quinn

    Tanya Quinn Guest

    Bikes are really handy for getting around campuses. Buy a decent lock for your bike - better yet buy
    two - a sturdy U-lock as well as a cable lock. (thus the bike thief would need to have two types of
    tools) As well with two locks it makes it easier to lock both wheels. Lock any pieces of the bike
    that can easily disappear.

    Beyond that, park your bike near other bicycles preferably nicer where your bike doesn't look
    particularly like a target amongst them. If everyone on your campus has a brown 70's bike, then
    yours would look the most tempting. Most likely it will fit in well.

    [email protected] (bluesman5920) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State University). I went to my local bike
    > shop and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought
    > this very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.
    >
    > A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    > like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a
    > bike to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could I
    > do to secure it?
     
  5. Eric Vey

    Eric Vey Guest

    Oh. And don't forget the big basket in the front. It completes the look and makes carrying your
    books a breeze.

    "Eric Vey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > --get an old clunker. But do look for one with a 3speed hub,
    especially
    > if you've got hills. I just bought myself a new one last week, for about $150. Good steel frame,
    > 3speed, drum brakes, baggage rack, lighting system, manufactured '85, all bearings adjusted
    > properly, but slightly rusty
    and
    > unsightly.--
    >
    > This is what I did when I was in college. I bought an old 3 speed for $35. I kept it looking bad,
    > but running good.
    >
    > I was pretty good about keeping it locked, but one night the rack got hit by "professionals" all
    > aged under 18. The whole rack gets cleared out except for mine and a single speed . . . I had
    > forgotten to lock
    up
    > that night.
    >
    >
    > "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On 1 Jun 2003 14:25:08 -0700, [email protected]
    (bluesman5920)
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State
    > University).
    > > > I went to my local bike shop and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I
    > > > really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought this
    very
    > > >inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.
    > > >
    > > >A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    > > >like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a
    > > >bike to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned
    bike
    > > >be ok and what could I do to secure it?
    > >
    > > [Note: I'm on a different continent. Not everything in my experience necessarily applies]
    > >
    > > Lock it, and for god's sake don't overclean. It's fine to clean the
    > moving
    > > parts, chain, axles, and other bearings, but otherwise, the more mud
    &
    > > rust you're dragging along the better, for camouflage. But the most important thing is and
    > > remains lock discipline. Summary: get a lock
    > that
    > > an average thief can't open in three seconds flat. That category
    > includes
    > > most chain locks and locks that have a separate padlock, plus the
    > cheaper
    > > and midrange variants of cable locks. A good quality U-lock works
    > fine,
    > > but the cheap ones suck. Two locks are much better than the sum of
    > their
    > > parts. Locking your bike to the "solid world", so that the pro
    thieves
    > > don't just drive a truck up and lift a dozen bikes into them, for
    > cracking
    > > their locks at leisure, also a good idea.
    > >
    > > The best lock IMHO is a chain lock by Cyclops[1]. The difference
    with
    > > regular chain locks is that these are through and through hardened
    > steel,
    > > where most chains are either mild steel or mild steel with a
    hardened
    > > outer layer. Boltcutters just curl up and die when they see these
    > babies.
    > >
    > > Whether you can find those in the US would be a major stumbling
    block,
    > > though.
    > >
    > > Ring locks[2] are extremely convenient, because they screw onto the
    > bike
    > > and thus you don't have to worry about having it with you, or
    storing
    > it
    > > somewhewre on the bike after you unlock it -- just insert key,
    twist,
    > and
    > > you can go. I have no idea if that kind of lock is commonly
    available
    > in
    > > the US, though, and don't get one any cheaper than that Axa model
    from
    > the
    > > footnote. The Axa SL-7 is already much better, and not much more expensive. When you leave your
    > > bike in a high risk area for longer
    > periods
    > > of time, two locks are the way to go, one of which should lock your
    > bike
    > > to the bike rack.
    > >
    > > If you get good locks (and expect to spend $50 or so on locks, if
    the
    > bike
    > > doesn't come with anything decent), and use them, and don't leave
    the
    > keys
    > > in (my personal bane -- lost 3 or 4 bikes that way), then you should
    > be
    > > okay.
    > >
    > > If you want to be frugal (and/or spend the rest on beer), not worry
    > about
    > > your bike much, and be able to replace it fairly cheaply, get an old clunker. But do look for
    > > one with a 3speed hub, especially if you've
    > got
    > > hills. I just bought myself a new one last week, for about $150.
    Good
    > > steel frame, 3speed, drum brakes, baggage rack, lighting system, manufactured '85, all bearings
    > > adjusted properly, but slightly rusty
    > and
    > > unsightly.
    > >
    > > Here in the Netherlands, you can leave such a bike with just a ring
    > lock
    > > without much trouble. Leaving a bike without *any* locks means
    > screaming
    > > at the top of your voice "Hey, drunk fratboys! Free transportation
    > back to
    > > home!", even aside from 'real' thieves.
    > >
    > >
    > > Jasper
    > >
    > > [1] http://www.armada-bike-security.com/
    > >
    > > [2]
    > >
    >
    http://www.wheel2wheel4bikes.com/products.php?mcat=2&brand=27&scat=93&prodid=158
     
  6. On 1 Jun 2003, Tanya Quinn wrote:

    > Bikes are really handy for getting around campuses. Buy a decent lock for your bike - better yet
    > buy two - a sturdy U-lock as well as a cable lock. (thus the bike thief would need to have two
    > types of tools) As well with two locks it makes it easier to lock both wheels. Lock any pieces of
    > the bike that can easily disappear.
    >

    One more recommendation: If you're getting an MTB-styled bike, it will likely come standard with a
    quick-release seatpost. If so, replace it immediately with a regular pinch bolt, or somebody will
    steal your seatpost and saddle. Silly, I know, but common here at the U of Washington.

    Trent
     
  7. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]du>, trent gregory hill
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > One more recommendation: If you're getting an MTB-styled bike, it will likely come standard with a
    > quick-release seatpost. If so, replace it immediately with a regular pinch bolt, or somebody will
    > steal your seatpost and saddle. Silly, I know, but common here at the U of Washington.

    Sometimes I wish my Ol' Pig Iron had a QR seatpost. They are nice for dealing with steeper slopes.
    And there are nifty first aid kits that are designed to be discretely crammed down the seat tube.

    I often see riders who've parked their bikes, with saddle & post hanging from their backpacks. IOW,
    you can just take it with you. OTOH, I guess it's nice to have one less thing to deal with in the
    parking ritual/rigamarole of locking up, doffing hat, glasses & gloves, removing lights, etc.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  8. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >[email protected]

    wrote:

    >I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State University). I went to my local bike shop
    >and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought this
    >very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.

    ---snip---

    It sounds like a good choice.

    >A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    >like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a bike
    >to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could I do to
    >secure it?

    Unfortunately, there does seem to be a higher incidence of bike theft on and around college
    campuses than in the real world- no offense intended to anyone in the academic world- but if you
    buy and *use* a decent lock while you're going to classes etcetera you'll really cut the odds of
    having your ride stolen. At night your best course would be to store it inside. Having said that, I
    think most college students would be wise to consider a $250 MTB as a consumable that may last for
    a couple of years. Even if you have two such bikes stolen during a four year college career you'll
    only be out $500. IME, in the same four years a typical college male will spend more than that on
    spilled beer. <g>

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  9. Bluesman5920

    Bluesman5920 Guest

    So, taking out the seat (or replacing the mechanism), several decent locks, and I should be set to
    go? Also the bike that I mentioned (trek 4100 alpha), is that a good bike? I have forgotten a lot
    about bikes since I had a very serious bike accident 10 years ago and I really haven't ridden since
    (but I'm not afraid to start again.)

    (There really aren't any used bike shops or pawn shops in my area and I got a sum of graduation
    money specifically for a bike so that bike looks like my only option at the moment.)
     
  10. On 1 Jun 2003 18:20:01 -0700, [email protected] (Tanya Quinn) wrote:

    >Lock any pieces of the bike that can easily disappear.

    This is also an issue: If you get a bike with quick release wheels or seatpost, or anything else for
    that matter, switch them out for things with regular locknuts. You don't want to come back to a bike
    with either or both wheels and/or seatpost/saddle missing.

    Jasper
     
  11. Zeldabee

    Zeldabee Guest

    Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 1 Jun 2003 18:20:01 -0700, [email protected] (Tanya Quinn) wrote:
    >
    > >Lock any pieces of the bike that can easily disappear.
    >
    > This is also an issue: If you get a bike with quick release wheels or seatpost, or anything else
    > for that matter, switch them out for things with regular locknuts. You don't want to come back to
    > a bike with either or both wheels and/or seatpost/saddle missing.

    Alternatively, you could just be sure to lock each wheel. I live in NYC, and use a NY lock (heavy
    chain) and a U lock. In OK you could get away with a good cable and a U lock. Cable your bike to
    something solid through one wheel, then U lock the other wheel to the bike.

    I left the QR on my seatpost, here, and put a length of bike chain through the seat rails and frame.
    A little duct tape on the saddle, and it's a less attractive target. It's less of a PITA to change
    flats, etc., if you leave the QR on.

    --
    z e l d a b e e @ p a n i x . c o m http://NewsReader.Com/
     
  12. Jacques

    Jacques Guest

    To summarize: your bike will most likely be stolen, vandalized, it will take you 10 minutes to lock
    your 3 different locks, you will carry with you 1 helmet, 1 saddle and two wheels. ;-) Still, don't
    feel discouraged by everything they say !

    Cheers Jacques
     
  13. Zeldabee

    Zeldabee Guest

    "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > To summarize: your bike will most likely be stolen, vandalized, it will take you 10 minutes to
    > lock your 3 different locks, you will carry with you 1 helmet, 1 saddle and two wheels. ;-) Still,
    > don't feel discouraged by everything they say !

    It can't be worse than NYC, and I never carried that much around with
    me...I just locked them securely. It's by far the best way to get around the city--at 5 1/2 months
    pregnant, I'm not riding, and boy, do I miss the freedom.

    --
    z e l d a b e e @ p a n i x . c o m http://NewsReader.Com/
     
  14. Jacques

    Jacques Guest

    4 more to wait... and then you can buy a nice little trailer. Or maybe in NYC it is not reasonable ?
     
  15. Yep. Just buy a beater bike and fix it up to make it reliable. Noboby will likely steal it and if
    they do, you won't be out much money.

    jacques wrote:
    >
    > To summarize: your bike will most likely be stolen, vandalized, it will take you 10 minutes to
    > lock your 3 different locks, you will carry with you 1 helmet, 1 saddle and two wheels. ;-) Still,
    > don't feel discouraged by everything they say !
    >
    > Cheers Jacques
     
  16. Zeldabee

    Zeldabee Guest

    "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > 4 more to wait...

    Um... 3 1/2, unless I go late.

    > and then you can buy a nice little trailer. Or maybe in NYC it is not reasonable ?

    Not really. I've used a cargo trailer without problems, but wouldn't feel comfortable with a baby in
    a trailer in the city. Depending on childcare arrangements, it's looking like I won't be able to
    commute by bike until he's old enough for a bike seat, and I'm not so sure how I feel about those.

    Who knows when I'll be riding regularly again, much less touring. We'll see.

    --
    z e l d a b e e @ p a n i x . c o m http://NewsReader.Com/
     
  17. [email protected] (bluesman5920) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am looking to buy a bicycle for college (Oklahoma State University). I went to my local bike
    > shop and found a Trek 4100 Alpha that I really liked ($250). For the college atmosphere, I thought
    > this very inexpensive mountain bike would be a good choice.
    >
    > A lot of people have said that any bike I take to college will be stolen and that I really need
    > like a brown 70's broken bike to have any hope of not getting one stolen. Should I even take a
    > bike to college and if so what should I take? Will the above-mentioned bike be ok and what could I
    > do to secure it?

    old bikes don't have to be ugly and broken--just unfashionable, and not too shiny...

    if you buy a nice bike, buy an even-nicer lock--and USE IT. In fact, buy two. Lock the frame rear
    wheel to something solid with a U-lock and loop a cable lock around anything that can be
    stolen...then loop that to something solid as well.

    Don't lock to any 'bike stand' that isn't securely bolted down, or better, embedded a meter deep
    in concrete.

    Find yourself some friends with more money than sense, and find out where they park their nicer,
    unsecure bicycles. Park yours nearby, but secure it mightily against theft. Then sit back as thieves
    go for the nice bikes which are easier to steal than yours.

    If you're storing the bike outside, a nice bike might not be a good idea. When you're not riding it,
    it will get rained on, and parts will rust. That will suck. Lock it under cover, or better, indoors,
    if you can. If you're just going to leave the bicycle outside to the elements, I would suggest you
    buy a beater bike that you can live with; no point spending big bucks on something that'll rust.

    By all means bring a bike. Student life is so much easier with one, generally speaking. But also buy
    lights (riding at night without them is bad enough--now do it when the roads are full of boozed-up
    fratboys). and learn to ride on the road (faster. fewer pedestrians. and, once you're over the
    initial fear, not very hard at all--you can drive on the roads, can't you?)

    I'm a grad student in London; it's a big busy city and the building I live in has nowhere to store
    bicycles indoors (not anywhere they'd *let* us store bikes anyway) so I ride an UGLY pink mixte
    (that's a girls' bike) with a 3-speed hub brake. It's ugly enough that nobody wants to steal it (and
    it's locked up decently). I leave it outside to deal with the weather. If I had different
    arrangements--secure indoor bike storage, say--I would have brought my nice bike from home.

    -Luigi
     
  18. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    02 Jun 2003 22:32:09 GMT, <[email protected]>, zeldabee
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Not really. I've used a cargo trailer without problems, but wouldn't feel comfortable with a baby
    >in a trailer in the city. Depending on childcare arrangements, it's looking like I won't be able to
    >commute by bike until he's old enough for a bike seat, and I'm not so sure how I feel about those.

    On a MTB, I've seen the soft sling back-pack carriers work for infants.

    Of course, as always, Sheldon Brown has the answer: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/carrababy.html
    --
    zk
     
  19. Garmonboezia

    Garmonboezia Guest

    [email protected] (bluesman5920) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > So, taking out the seat (or replacing the mechanism), several decent locks, and I should be set to
    > go? Also the bike that I mentioned (trek 4100 alpha), is that a good bike? I have forgotten a lot
    > about bikes since I had a very serious bike accident 10 years ago and I really haven't ridden
    > since (but I'm not afraid to start again.)
    >
    > (There really aren't any used bike shops or pawn shops in my area and I got a sum of graduation
    > money specifically for a bike so that bike looks like my only option at the moment.)
    >

    Just my opinion....

    I think you could live with one good U-lock as long as you remove the front wheel and run the lock
    through the frame and both wheels AND attach to a firm metal upright like a no parking sign.

    I took a quick look at the Trek website. The 4100 doesn't appear to have a quick release seatpost so
    I think you're OK there. For $250 it will do the job. I wouldn't sink more into it though, beyond
    routine upkeep.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, jacques <[email protected]> wrote:
    >To summarize: your bike will most likely be stolen, vandalized, it will take you 10 minutes to lock
    >your 3 different locks, you will carry with you 1 helmet, 1 saddle and two wheels. ;-) Still, don't
    >feel discouraged by everything they say !

    Just to offer one counterexample to all this doom and gloom. I live near a big college campus, and
    have a couple bikes (old 10-speeds of probably no real monetary value), which I've left on or near
    campus completely unlocked overnight on several occasions without their being touched.

    Now I use a newer bike, which I also frequently park on or near campus, and I always lock it with an
    inexpensive U-lock but I don't take any additional precautions.

    A reasonable amount of caution (like an ordinary U-lock, always used) is probably all that's
    required. You won't eliminate the risk of theft entirely (you never can), but you'll probably get
    through college without having the bike stolen.

    --Bruce F.
     
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