Bike Racks?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bob Newman, Aug 5, 2004.

  1. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Guest

    We are trying to free up a little room in the house and I want to get the
    bikes better organized. I've seen these racks that stack two bikes
    vertically but I'm not sure I'm up to lifting the top one on & off
    regularly. How are these hooks that let you hang the bikes on the wall by
    the wheel. To us untrained people it seems like a lot of strain on the
    wheel. Can they cause any damage to the bike?

    Thanks in advance... Bob
     
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  2. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 5 Aug 2004 20:18:58 -0400, <[email protected]>,
    "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How are these hooks that let you hang the bikes on the wall by
    >the wheel. To us untrained people it seems like a lot of strain on the
    >wheel. Can they cause any damage to the bike?


    No problems from hanging bikes by their wheels.
    --
    zk
     
  3. Bob Newman wrote:

    > We are trying to free up a little room in the house and I want to get the
    > bikes better organized. I've seen these racks that stack two bikes
    > vertically but I'm not sure I'm up to lifting the top one on & off
    > regularly. How are these hooks that let you hang the bikes on the wall by
    > the wheel. To us untrained people it seems like a lot of strain on the
    > wheel. Can they cause any damage to the bike?


    We have had six bikes hanging that way since about 1980. No problems.

    In fact: One evening my brother brought his two kids over. They were
    about 10 or 12, I'd say. We were upstairs, the boys were bored playing
    in the basement, and I heard one say "Nick, you'd better cut it out!"

    I went downstairs to find Nick using one of the bikes as a swing!
    _Still_ no problems.


    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  4. On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 10:28:17 -0400, Frank Krygowski
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bob Newman wrote:
    >
    >> We are trying to free up a little room in the house and I want to get the
    >> bikes better organized. I've seen these racks that stack two bikes
    >> vertically but I'm not sure I'm up to lifting the top one on & off
    >> regularly. How are these hooks that let you hang the bikes on the wall by
    >> the wheel. To us untrained people it seems like a lot of strain on the
    >> wheel. Can they cause any damage to the bike?

    >
    >We have had six bikes hanging that way since about 1980. No problems.
    >
    >In fact: One evening my brother brought his two kids over. They were
    >about 10 or 12, I'd say. We were upstairs, the boys were bored playing
    >in the basement, and I heard one say "Nick, you'd better cut it out!"
    >
    >I went downstairs to find Nick using one of the bikes as a swing!
    >_Still_ no problems.


    When I was at Cambridge, the University installed some meat-hook style
    bikeracks near the History Faculty building. This was meant to
    address the chronic shortage of bike parking spaces.

    Many of us in the History department began lobbying aggressively for
    their removal and replacement with more conventional Sheffield stands,
    citing the difficulty (and mess) of having to hang up your bike,
    potentially dripping with rain and muck and whatnot (it is Cambridge
    after all. It rains. a lot.) onto a meathook. That, and a lot of
    people--not least the dons themselves--still use majestically heavy
    bicycles to get around, and hoisting 20-some kg of bicycle over your
    head is no fun when you're running to a lecture.

    So the Faculty began petitioning the university authorities. "Bike
    racks, not meat hooks!" went the slogan. As far as I'm aware, the
    campaign failed, and the meathooks are still there, in the passage
    between the Seeley and the new Divinity building. And as far as I'm
    aware, they're always full.

    -Luigi
     
  5. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Guest

    Well I guess that settles it.

    Bob


    "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 10:28:17 -0400, Frank Krygowski
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Bob Newman wrote:
    > >
    > >> We are trying to free up a little room in the house and I want to get

    the
    > >> bikes better organized. I've seen these racks that stack two bikes
    > >> vertically but I'm not sure I'm up to lifting the top one on & off
    > >> regularly. How are these hooks that let you hang the bikes on the wall

    by
    > >> the wheel. To us untrained people it seems like a lot of strain on the
    > >> wheel. Can they cause any damage to the bike?

    > >
    > >We have had six bikes hanging that way since about 1980. No problems.
    > >
    > >In fact: One evening my brother brought his two kids over. They were
    > >about 10 or 12, I'd say. We were upstairs, the boys were bored playing
    > >in the basement, and I heard one say "Nick, you'd better cut it out!"
    > >
    > >I went downstairs to find Nick using one of the bikes as a swing!
    > >_Still_ no problems.

    >
    > When I was at Cambridge, the University installed some meat-hook style
    > bikeracks near the History Faculty building. This was meant to
    > address the chronic shortage of bike parking spaces.
    >
    > Many of us in the History department began lobbying aggressively for
    > their removal and replacement with more conventional Sheffield stands,
    > citing the difficulty (and mess) of having to hang up your bike,
    > potentially dripping with rain and muck and whatnot (it is Cambridge
    > after all. It rains. a lot.) onto a meathook. That, and a lot of
    > people--not least the dons themselves--still use majestically heavy
    > bicycles to get around, and hoisting 20-some kg of bicycle over your
    > head is no fun when you're running to a lecture.
    >
    > So the Faculty began petitioning the university authorities. "Bike
    > racks, not meat hooks!" went the slogan. As far as I'm aware, the
    > campaign failed, and the meathooks are still there, in the passage
    > between the Seeley and the new Divinity building. And as far as I'm
    > aware, they're always full.
    >
    > -Luigi
     
  6. gooserider

    gooserider Guest

    "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > We are trying to free up a little room in the house and I want to get the
    > bikes better organized. I've seen these racks that stack two bikes
    > vertically but I'm not sure I'm up to lifting the top one on & off
    > regularly.


    How heavy is your bike? I use a rack like you mention and putting the bike
    on the top hooks is no biggie.
     
  7. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> writes:


    > As far as I'm aware, the
    > campaign failed, and the meathooks are still there, in the passage
    > between the Seeley and the new Divinity building. And as far as I'm
    > aware, they're always full.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Too bad; I was whimsically envisioning ways to make those
    meathooks musical, clanging against each other, when not in use.
    Maybe if they were artsie-fartsie'd up a bit, it might at least
    cheer people up about having to use 'em.

    If there's a big ol' bronze statue of Newton handy somewhere
    around there, I'd feel /so/ compelled to lock my bike to that -
    just 'cuz it seems so apropos somehow. Especially if I could
    lock my bike to his ankle, like a ball-&-chain. But no doubt
    some stuffed shirt would complain about it.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  8. On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 18:19:24 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >
    >> As far as I'm aware, the
    >> campaign failed, and the meathooks are still there, in the passage
    >> between the Seeley and the new Divinity building. And as far as I'm
    >> aware, they're always full.

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >
    >Too bad; I was whimsically envisioning ways to make those
    >meathooks musical, clanging against each other, when not in use.
    >Maybe if they were artsie-fartsie'd up a bit, it might at least
    >cheer people up about having to use 'em.


    The meathooks had uncomfortable resonances with the last days of
    Mussolini--but then, you're dealing with the History faculty, and we
    were the only people to worry much about Mussolini anyway.

    >
    >If there's a big ol' bronze statue of Newton handy somewhere
    >around there, I'd feel /so/ compelled to lock my bike to that -
    >just 'cuz it seems so apropos somehow. Especially if I could
    >lock my bike to his ankle, like a ball-&-chain. But no doubt
    >some stuffed shirt would complain about it.


    Funnily enough, there isn't. And someone would probably tell you to
    move your bike, eventually. Cambridge is so very proper like that.

    And it isn't the stuffiness of the shirt as much as the length of the
    gown that you've got to worry about. (Incidentally, cycling with an
    undergraduate gown on, on your way to Hall in college, is great
    fun--if preposterously non-aero)

    Although there is a war memorial--a bas-relief in wall of Great St.
    Mary's Church, on the outside, facing the market square--in memory of
    the dead of the Great War, showing two soldiers standing solemly, arms
    reversed. It's fun to lock your bike up against that--one gets the
    impression that they're guarding your bike....

    -Luigi



    >
    >
    >cheers,
    > Tom
     
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