[BREAKING NEWS] Pantani is dead

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Davide Tosi, Feb 14, 2004.

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  1. Davide Tosi

    Davide Tosi Guest

    About one hour ago Marco Pantani was found dead in a bedroom of a residence in Rimini. The cause of
    his death is not known, yet.
     
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  2. Benjo Maso

    Benjo Maso Guest

    "Davide Tosi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > About one hour ago Marco Pantani was found dead in a bedroom of a
    residence
    > in Rimini. The cause of his death is not known, yet.

    This is really terrible. May he find the peace which was refused to him when he was alive.

    Benjo Maso
     
  3. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Davide Tosi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > About one hour ago Marco Pantani was found dead in a bedroom of a
    > residence
    > > in Rimini. The cause of his death is not known, yet.
    >
    >
    > This is really terrible. May he find the peace which was refused to him
    when
    > he was alive.
    >
    > Benjo Maso

    Amen. May he find peace. Gimondi's words are sadly appropriate:

    Gimondi told Italian newspaper Gazzetta dello Sport: "I am shocked and traumatised.

    "Marco has paid a very dear price for everything. For years he was in the eye of the cycling after
    being world number one.

    "He then withdrew into himself. He was alone."
     
  4. pedalchick

    pedalchick New Member

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    I've been thinking lately, since I heard reports of Pantani's depression and alleged weight gain, how much I would like to tell him how I admired his style. Few riders had the kind of panache that he did, and I'm sorry, but it wasn't all drugs. You don't make a rider like that out of nothing with a bunch of EPO. I wanted to tell him how I take back all the things I said to people about how he was just a dirty doper and his victories meant nothing. I wanted to tell him I finally got a chance to watch the 1998 Giro and Tour and he was awesome.
    I wanted him to come back and add some style to the grand tours. Everyone rides so conservatively and predictably it seems. Mayo was a small light in the darkness, but nothing like Pantani, who would (like in 2000?) seem to be about to get dropped, claw his way back to the group and then attack again and again with such ferocity until he got away to win (remember Ventoux?). Finally, in last year's Giro d'Italia, his ride on that one steep ass stage where he paced Garzelli up the most brutal part of the climb was sheer brilliance. They guy had been through the wringer, constantly hounded, under incessant litigation, but he managed enough class to pull out one big ride.
    Pantani was a brilliant champion, and a spectacular competitor who didn't deserve half of the crap he got. He was used as an example while probably not being any dirtier than any of his competitors - he was left to hang out to dry while others who were caught red-handed were given raps on the hands and set free to race again (Casagrande? Zulle?). Had he just said "sure, I took some EPO. I won't do it again" he would have been fine. Who knows, maybe he was really innocent and clean? They never did prove anything except a high hematocrit. ****, I have a naturally high hematocrit, but I still suck.
    I wish I could have told the guy all this. I wish someone could have given him his pride back. For all the entertainment the man provided to cycling fans, he could at least have been treated with some respect by the sporting authorities and journalists - and all you bastards on r.b.r, too. Instead, he died alone and embittered to the sport.

    R.I.P. Mr. Pantani...
     
  5. Extremely well put, pedalchick.

    ------
    Denny Gill Chugiak, Alaska
     
  6. Evan Evans

    Evan Evans Guest

    Pantani was a troubled soul. Luck was not often on his side. A terrible loss..
     
  7. BJC

    BJC New Member

    Joined:
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    AMEN! I heard he was a pretty good DJ to top it all off.
     
  8. "BJC" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Who knows, maybe he was really innocent and clean? They never did prove anything except a high
    > > hematocrit. ****,

    Don't kid yourself.

    When he was in that crash w/ the car that broke his femur, his hct fluctuated wildly while he was in
    the hospital. IIRC, it went down to 16%, then doctors had to inject him with EPO to get it back up.

    What is that a sign of? EPO dependency.

    The body has its own natural checks and balances - when people cycle a drug for too long, the body
    shuts down the natural production of whatever it is the drug mimics (bodybuilders (shriveled
    testicles) and testosterone) (heroin users and naturally occuring opiates).
     
  9. Miller

    Miller Guest

    pedalchick <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > B. Lafferty wrote:
    > > "benjo maso" Amen. May he find peace. Gimondi's words are sadly appropriate: Gimondi told
    > > Italian newspaper Gazzetta dello Sport: "I am shocked and traumatised. "Marco has paid a very
    > > dear price for everything. For years he was in the eye of the cycling after being world number
    > > one. "He then withdrew into himself. He was alone."
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been thinking lately, since I heard reports of Pantani's depression and alleged weight gain,
    > how much I would like to tell him how I admired his style. Few riders had the kind of panache that
    > he did, and I'm sorry, but it wasn't all drugs. You don't make a rider like that out of nothing
    > with a bunch of EPO. I wanted to tell him how I take back all the things I said to people about
    > how he was just a dirty doper and his victories meant nothing. I wanted to tell him I finally got
    > a chance to watch the 1998 Giro and Tour and he was awesome. I wanted him to come back and add
    > some style to the grand tours. Everyone rides so conservatively and predictably it seems. Mayo was
    > a small light in the darkness, but nothing like Pantani, who would (like in 2000?) seem to be
    > about to get dropped, claw his way back to the group and then attack again and again with such
    > ferocity until he got away to win (remember Ventoux?). Finally, in last year's Giro d'Italia, his
    > ride on that one steep ass stage where he paced Garzelli up the most brutal part of the climb was
    > sheer brilliance. They guy had been through the wringer, constantly hounded, under incessant
    > litigation, but he managed enough class to pull out one big ride. Pantani was a brilliant
    > champion, and a spectacular competitor who didn't deserve half of the crap he got. He was used as
    > an example while probably not being any dirtier than any of his competitors - he was left to hang
    > out to dry while others who were caught red-handed were given raps on the hands and set free to
    > race again (Casagrande? Zulle?). Had he just said "sure, I took some EPO. I won't do it again" he
    > would have been fine. Who knows, maybe he was really innocent and clean? They never did prove
    > anything except a high hematocrit. ****, I have a naturally high hematocrit, but I still suck. I
    > wish I could have told the guy all this. I wish someone could have given him his pride back. For
    > all the entertainment the man provided to cycling fans, he could at least have been treated with
    > some respect by the sporting authorities and journalists - and all you bastards on
    > r.b.r, too. Instead, he died alone and embittered to the sport.
    >
    > R.I.P. Mr. Pantani...
    >
    >
    >
    > --

    You took the words right out of my mouth. I have been watching Pantani since the early 90s and it
    was always exhilarating to see him climb. I have briefly met him a time or two and found him quite
    pleasant. A great rider and a good guy. And this is about the point that the RBR "Dumbass" moral
    brigade start chiming in with their dime store insight. M
     
  10. Amit

    Amit Guest

    pedalchick <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<UVAXb.33261

    > I've been thinking lately, since I heard reports of Pantani's depression and alleged weight gain,
    > how much I would like to tell him how I admired his style. Few riders had the kind of panache that
    > he did, and I'm sorry, but it wasn't all drugs. You don't make a rider like that out of nothing
    > with a bunch of EPO.

    This is very sad. Pantani was the most exciting rider to watch until his exclusion from the '99
    Giro. But the dark side of that was that most likley those great performances were drug
    performances.

    Even if performance enhancing drug use didn't directly contribute to his death, it (most probably)
    did lead to his downfall.

    -Amit
     
  11. Sat, 14 Feb 2004 23:48:52 GMT, "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> > About one hour ago Marco Pantani was found dead(...)

    >> This is really terrible. May he find the peace which was refused to him when he was alive.

    >Amen. May he find peace.

    May he rest in peace. Campionissimo Il Pirata vive sempre!!
    --
    [email protected]
     
  12. "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]

    > Don't kid yourself.
    >
    > When he was in that crash w/ the car that broke his femur, his hct fluctuated wildly while he was
    > in the hospital. IIRC, it went down to 16%, then doctors had to inject him with EPO to get it
    > back up.
    >
    > What is that a sign of? EPO dependency.
    >
    > The body has its own natural checks and balances - when people cycle a
    drug
    > for too long, the body shuts down the natural production of whatever it is the drug mimics
    > (bodybuilders (shriveled testicles) and testosterone) (heroin users and naturally occuring
    > opiates).


    Asswipe,

    Next Kunich will be posting about how to successfully attract women.

    Thanks, Hold My
     
  13. "Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > You took the words right out of my mouth. I have been watching Pantani since the early 90s and it
    > was always exhilarating to see him climb. I have briefly met him a time or two and found him quite
    > pleasant. A great rider and a good guy. And this is about the point that the RBR "Dumbass" moral
    > brigade start chiming in with their dime store insight. M

    Yeah, he was a great guy - he cheated and won alot of bike races. Then acted like it was everyone
    else's fault when he got caught.
     
  14. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Amit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > This is very sad. Pantani was the most exciting rider to watch until his exclusion from the '99
    > Giro. But the dark side of that was that most likley those great performances were drug
    > performances.

    And who's performances weren't/aren't given what we've seen in the sport since Festina '98?
     
  15. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    You might find Indurain's comments of interest.

    Spain's five-times Tour de France winner Miguel Indurain described Pantani as a "tragic genius".

    "Apart from his undeniable quality as a rider, he got people hooked on the sport," Indurain said of
    the specialist climber in the Spanish sports daily Marca.

    "There may be riders who have achieved more than him, but they never succeeded in drawing in the
    fans like he did."

    Pantani made his name in 1995 by daring to attack Indurain in the mountain stages of the Giro
    and the Tour.

    "What I liked about him was his explosive power in the mountains -- he knew how to attack, but also
    had the ability to sustain his form," Indurain said.

    "I also admired his reserved character, his way of behaving during the race -- it was something that
    made him different to the rest."

    "pedalchick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > B. Lafferty wrote:
    > > "benjo maso" Amen. May he find peace. Gimondi's words are sadly appropriate: Gimondi told
    > > Italian newspaper Gazzetta dello Sport: "I am shocked and traumatised. "Marco has paid a very
    > > dear price for everything. For years he was in the eye of the cycling after being world number
    > > one. "He then withdrew into himself. He was alone."
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been thinking lately, since I heard reports of Pantani's depression and alleged weight gain,
    > how much I would like to tell him how I admired his style. Few riders had the kind of panache that
    > he did, and I'm sorry, but it wasn't all drugs. You don't make a rider like that out of nothing
    > with a bunch of EPO. I wanted to tell him how I take back all the things I said to people about
    > how he was just a dirty doper and his victories meant nothing. I wanted to tell him I finally got
    > a chance to watch the 1998 Giro and Tour and he was awesome. I wanted him to come back and add
    > some style to the grand tours. Everyone rides so conservatively and predictably it seems. Mayo was
    > a small light in the darkness, but nothing like Pantani, who would (like in 2000?) seem to be
    > about to get dropped, claw his way back to the group and then attack again and again with such
    > ferocity until he got away to win (remember Ventoux?). Finally, in last year's Giro d'Italia, his
    > ride on that one steep ass stage where he paced Garzelli up the most brutal part of the climb was
    > sheer brilliance. They guy had been through the wringer, constantly hounded, under incessant
    > litigation, but he managed enough class to pull out one big ride. Pantani was a brilliant
    > champion, and a spectacular competitor who didn't deserve half of the crap he got. He was used as
    > an example while probably not being any dirtier than any of his competitors - he was left to hang
    > out to dry while others who were caught red-handed were given raps on the hands and set free to
    > race again (Casagrande? Zulle?). Had he just said "sure, I took some EPO. I won't do it again" he
    > would have been fine. Who knows, maybe he was really innocent and clean? They never did prove
    > anything except a high hematocrit. ****, I have a naturally high hematocrit, but I still suck. I
    > wish I could have told the guy all this. I wish someone could have given him his pride back. For
    > all the entertainment the man provided to cycling fans, he could at least have been treated with
    > some respect by the sporting authorities and journalists - and all you bastards on
    > r.b.r, too. Instead, he died alone and embittered to the sport.
    >
    > R.I.P. Mr. Pantani...
    >
    >
    >
    > --
     
  16. leif_ericson

    leif_ericson New Member

    Joined:
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    0
    Didn't Merckx once test 'positive' in the Giro? How come nowone hates him?

    I think Pantani took way too much heat in the last 5 years. :(
     
  17. labicci

    labicci New Member

    Joined:
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    There have been a lot of accusation surrounding EPO doping, but how much scientific research has been done in this area? Sounds a lot like assumptions.

    How much truth is in the assertion that an athlete's natural haematocrit level will drop after rigorous exercise? They may have done some research on athletes in general, but have they done any research on TdF cyclists whose level of activities are much higher than the average athletes? Human body is rather complicated and the way that it responses to stresses may not be what the doctors had expected.

    And yet how come so many people simply believe the so-called expert's assumption and point their fingers at one great athlete who may be totally innocent? No wonder he is so depressed. Depression can kill one man, fast.

     
  18. On 02/15/2004 04:16 AM, in article [email protected], "hold
    my beer and watch this..." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Next Kunich will be posting about how to successfully attract women.

    Kunch's attracted at least one woman; which means that he's likely more experienced at it than
    Kurgan/Henry is ...

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net bellum
    pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee why you ti
    ay aitch aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you double-yew double-ewe
    dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  19. Sierraman

    Sierraman Guest

    "pedalchick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:UVAXb.33261$Ct5[email protected]...
    > B. Lafferty wrote:
    > > "benjo maso" Amen. May he find peace. Gimondi's words are sadly appropriate: Gimondi told
    > > Italian newspaper Gazzetta dello Sport: "I am shocked and traumatised. "Marco has paid a very
    > > dear price for everything. For years he was in the eye of the cycling after being world number
    > > one. "He then withdrew into himself. He was alone."
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been thinking lately, since I heard reports of Pantani's depression and alleged weight gain,
    > how much I would like to tell him how I admired his style. Few riders had the kind of panache that
    > he did, and I'm sorry, but it wasn't all drugs. You don't make a rider like that out of nothing
    > with a bunch of EPO. I wanted to tell him how I take back all the things I said to people about
    > how he was just a dirty doper and his victories meant nothing. I wanted to tell him I finally got
    > a chance to watch the 1998 Giro and Tour and he was awesome. I wanted him to come back and add
    > some style to the grand tours. Everyone rides so conservatively and predictably it seems. Mayo was
    > a small light in the darkness, but nothing like Pantani, who would (like in 2000?) seem to be
    > about to get dropped, claw his way back to the group and then attack again and again with such
    > ferocity until he got away to win (remember Ventoux?). Finally, in last year's Giro d'Italia, his
    > ride on that one steep ass stage where he paced Garzelli up the most brutal part of the climb was
    > sheer brilliance. They guy had been through the wringer, constantly hounded, under incessant
    > litigation, but he managed enough class to pull out one big ride. Pantani was a brilliant
    > champion, and a spectacular competitor who didn't deserve half of the crap he got. He was used as
    > an example while probably not being any dirtier than any of his competitors - he was left to hang
    > out to dry while others who were caught red-handed were given raps on the hands and set free to
    > race again (Casagrande? Zulle?). Had he just said "sure, I took some EPO. I won't do it again" he
    > would have been fine. Who knows, maybe he was really innocent and clean? They never did prove
    > anything except a high hematocrit. ****, I have a naturally high hematocrit, but I still suck. I
    > wish I could have told the guy all this. I wish someone could have given him his pride back. For
    > all the entertainment the man provided to cycling fans, he could at least have been treated with
    > some respect by the sporting authorities and journalists - and all you bastards on
    > r.b.r, too. Instead, he died alone and embittered to the sport.
    >
    > R.I.P. Mr. Pantani...

    Well said, as a fan, I think he provided great entertainment and again I am up for a one time
    forgiveness, this time in death.
     
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