Building roadie from frameset - Gios Compact Pro

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by simonnnca, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. simonnnca

    simonnnca New Member

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    Hi all,

    By way of background, I currently run a single speed that I take for 30km circuits a few times a week. Getting a little tired of huffing it singlespeed so am looking at moving towards a classic, steel roadie.

    And i've fallen in love with the Gios Compact Pro. Retails at $3,200AUD. However, i've managed to find a compact pro frameset in excellent condition, in my size, at a pretty nice price ($~1100AUD).

    First up - does anyone have any thoughts on the frame? From my research, $1100AUD is a very nice price for a near perfect compact pro frame.

    Secondly, thoughts on building it up from scratch? The off-the-shelf compact pro comes with the campagnolo Athena groupset - though I would think about just going with the campagnolo veloce as im not a professional/serious rider (and therefore feel I wouldnt be able to tell the difference between the veloce and athena). I'm excited at the prospect of building it up slowly, however, I also recognise there's a good chance of it being incredibly frustrating, difficult and expensive.

    I'm prepared to have some parts installed by the local bike shop, but on the whole, what are your thoughts on the frame + building it up with slightly less expensive components than the off-the-shelf version? I'm estimating the total cost at about $2,800.

    Thanks in advance,

    Simon
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a plan ...

    I agree that ~$1100AUD is a good price for a great steel frame in very good condition ...

    FYI. While there are some advantages to choosing components from Campagnolo's better groupsets, the advantage is probably not as great as it is when comparing Shimano components ...

    And, piecing the components, yourself, is certainly viable ...

    SUBJECTIVELY, the Ultra-Shift (Record & Chorus) shifters are nicer because the thumb shifter retains the capability of multiple "clicks" vs. the Power-Shift shifters sincle "click" per motion action (a really trivial matter in the grand scheme of things) ...

    IMO, the rest of the components are mostly a matter of material, weight, and finish ... so, nothing wrong with spending less since the difference is mostly cosmetic?

    BTW. The difference between the Veloce & Athena (beyond the material options & finish) is the chainrings ... with the Athena (actually, Centaur & better) chainrings being a little nicer to look at, but probably not any better functionally (because the shifters are so good) under most riding circumstances ...

    FYI. A decade-or-so, ago, in an effort to test the limits to which Campagnolo shifters could be pushed, I found that vintage (really old!), thin, unramped-and-unpinned chainrings worked very well (i.e., better than Shimano mechanical Road shifters paired with ramped-and-pinned chainrings!!!!).

    If you want an all-alloy ("silver") component group, then the Athena shifters are probably the best option because, AFAIK, the higher groups only have CF shifters ... and, the shift paddle on the lower groups which have "silver" brake levers are "black" (the same composite paddles used on the CF shifters).

    The PowerTorque crankset's BB spindle & non-driveside crankarm "interface" is a bit dodgy, IMO ...

    The UltraTorque crankset is definitely better than the PowerTorque Crankset, but requires a knowledgeable "Wrench" to ensure a good installation due to the nature of Hirth coupling ... consequently, you may want to consider an FSA MegaExo crankset/BB OR any other crank which suits your budget & aesthetic sensibilities.

    As far as the headset, you should probably limit your choice to a CHRIS KING or CAMPAGNOLO or CANE CREEK ... I don't think FSA makes 1" headsets, otherwise that would be another option ...

    BTW2. If you are going with an 11-speed drivetrain, then you may want to consider a Shimano/-compatible wheelset & Cassette ... it's mostly a matter of availability, or not ...

    And, Shimano Cassettes are almost generally available for much less.
     
  3. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I think you'll find the Gios geometry short in the top tube, steep in the seat and head angles, short in the rear triangle, and a bit long in form rake. This makes for a quick handling bike that might feel twitchy but stays upright on bad road.

    Before Alf whips out his Sheldon Brown chart on cog and chain compatibility, I'm going to say, if you're building a Campagnolo bike get Campy-compatible wheels and cassettes. If you're going with Shimano, use Shimano-compatible wheels and cassettes. No use starting a brand new project with B-fitting components, even if they are less expensive.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I believe that the "word" is that the 11-speed Cog spacing is essentially the same for Campagnolo & Shimano ... and, the only difference would be the flange offset & subsequent rear derailleur's stops ...

    While there are certainly enough Cog groupings in Campagnolo's catalog, there are MORE Shimano Cassettes with more combinations in a broader price range.

    Alternatively, because I have a slew of wheels which use Campagnolo Cassettes, 'I' would possibly consider using one of them if I were going to set up an 11-speed Shimano drivetrain if I didn't feel like lacing up a new wheelset.
     
  5. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    In that case . . .
     
  6. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    The new Athena has dumbed down Power Shift/Torque shifters and crank. Alf pointed out the differences above.

    If you go with Athena, my suggestion would be to look on eBay or another source where new old stock combo group may be acquired, or purchase the crankest and shifters separately, at least the shifters. I found a hybrid 2011/2012 Athena 11spd group on eBay which features the dual pivot brakes front and rear, along with the all black components of the 2012, BUT has the Ultra Shift/Torque functionality of the 2011 Athena, before they dumbed it down to power shift to create a bigger distinction between Athena and Chorus/Record/Super Record.
     
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