Buying A New Specialized - Upgrading Forks And Other Standard Equipment ?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by kokamiguardz, Jun 28, 2015.

  1. kokamiguardz

    kokamiguardz New Member

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    Howdy All,

    I'm trying to get back into biking after a long hiatus. I'm trying to decide between several entry level mountain bikes. Leaning toward Specialized, but not 100% decided.

    My immediate question is regarding switching out the standard equipment, specifically the suspension forks and possible other components. Can a new bike be ordered with non-standard equipment? If not, do most bike shops offer credit for the standard equipment to offset the purchase price of upgrades?

    My specific concern is selecting and equipping a bike to match my unusual body geometry (short and fat with a 28 inch inseam). Factory specs suggest that either a Hardrock Disc 26 or a Myka Disc 26 will accommodate my short legs. However, I don't trust the standard suspension forks (SR Suntour SF13-XCT 26" or SR Suntour XCT-MLO 26" respectively) to handle my current weight.

    I'd also welcome any suggestions on other bikes that might be suited to my short and heavy body. Sadly, my budget is only around $600.
     
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  2. thepieeatingjay

    thepieeatingjay New Member

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    How much do you weigh?
    Do you know what size bike you need?

    A $600 bike will come with stock components, putting a new fork or other parts on the bike will be an extra cost that you'll have to pay for.

    Had a look at the secondhand bike market?
     
  3. tarverten

    tarverten New Member

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    stock shocks will work fine as your weight will rarely if ever be over the bars. If you have to switch out anything just focus on items to get your fit correct on the bike like stem, bars and saddle (typically the shop will swap these items out for you and discount price etc)..replace other components as they wear or fail. I think you'll be surprised how durable the stock bike is though.
     
  4. blastguardgear

    blastguardgear New Member

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    If you are looking to upgrade before you have purchased, you are looking at the wrong bike, it is almost always cheaper to but a bike with the spec you need, rather than upgrade, especially with forks, which after the frame, are normally the most expensive part of a MTB to upgrade.
     
  5. shadowsupernature

    shadowsupernature New Member

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    Here's a thought. Ask the bike shop is Suntour offers stiffer springs for the shock. When I picked up a Specialized FSR XC from a local shop some years ago, they made that change with a Manitou fork. I just don't know if Suntour offers the same option, but it's worth a try.
     
  6. Totalarmordestine

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    You're getting off spending the money you plan to use to upgrade it up-front. Manufacturers get better deals than you do, and they're able to pass some of that savings on to the consumer. Unless you *really* know what you're doing and plan on taking your time and scouring eBay and Craigslist for deals, you'll get a better build by buying complete and only upgrading as things break (with the obvious exception of pedals, saddle if it doesn't fit, tires if the stock ones suck for the conditions you're riding, maybe grips).
     
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