Chain replacing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by davereo, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,639
    Likes Received:
    70
    I was just wondering what others do when they install a new chain. I usually wipe down the new chain with solvent and apply chain lube once it is on my bike. Is this recomended or should I just leave the tacky lube on the chain and clean and lube once the chain becomes dirty?
     
    Tags:


  2. MMMhills

    MMMhills Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    30
    I always soak the new chain to get of that nasty packing gunk. Then lube it.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davereo .

    I was just wondering what others do when they install a new chain. I usually wipe down the new chain with solvent and apply chain lube once it is on my bike. Is this recomended or should I just leave the tacky lube on the chain and clean and lube once the chain becomes dirty?


    FWIW. There is a school-of-thought which suggests that it is not beneficial to remove the cosmolene(-like) "packing gunk"/whatever which is certainly found on Shimano chains; particularly, if removal is done by soaking the chain in solvent (vs. simply wiping off the excess with something like WD-40) because soaking a chain in solvent strips the factory-installed lubricant in the critical, non-superficial parts of the chain.

    So, as much of a nuisance as it may be to have the cosmolene on a new chain, it is probably better to leave it on.
     
  4. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,639
    Likes Received:
    70
    I am going to leave it on this time.
    As far as soaking goes I stopped doing that a few years ago. I soaked an 8 speed chain in safety clean solvent at work and the chain felt like it had sand in afterwards. I could never get it lubricated back to life.
    I use a premoistened hand cleaner towelette made by "Wipe-all" to wipe off the chain when it gets dirty. They work really well and leave no residue behind. They also are great for removing chain tatoo and road tar on your bike.
     
  5. tafi

    tafi Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2003
    Messages:
    1,038
    Likes Received:
    17
    Yeah I used to be a fan of degreasing new chains. But then I read the pamphlet which comes with campagnolo chains. They recommend not to degrease. In thinking about it, it makes sense. The factory machinery applies the lube as the rivets, plates and rollers are being put together, which puts lube in all the places where it is needed. The chain will probably never be lubed this well ever again and the factory lube will usually last quite a long time.

    I do make one concession though. The lube is NOT needed on the outside of the chain. All this does is collect dirt (and how!) So after installation, I give the chain a wipe down with a cloth moistened with WD40 or kero or something like that. Regular wiping like this does tend to keep the drive train looking pretty clean without disolving the lube under the rollers.

    Only once I first hear squeaking (or more likely once I get tired of the dirt build up) do I then degrease (along with cassette and chainrings and a clean of the jockey wheels) and apply a thorough soaking of fresh wet lube, whence the cycle of regular wiping begins again.
     
  6. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,639
    Likes Received:
    70
    The towelettes are WYPALL made by kimberly clark if anyone is interested. Spelled wrong on original posting.
     
  7. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    2,111
    Likes Received:
    4
    The gunk on the chain is a rust inhibitor since most get shipped by sea. WD-40 to clean it and then lube.
     
Loading...
Loading...