Cleaning helmets

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bob M, Jun 30, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although getting the suckers back on,
    since the little glue pads seem to come off with them, can be hard), but what does one do with the
    helmet? I've dipped it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other techniques
    for cleaning a helmet?

    Thanks.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:
    : OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although getting the suckers back on,
    : since the little glue pads seem to come off with them, can be hard), but what does one do with the
    : helmet? I've dipped it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other
    : techniques for cleaning a helmet?

    just throw the whole thing in the dishwasher with the waterbottles like luigi told me to do. works
    great. maybe the chain, too.

    finally found a use for the dishwasher.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  3. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although getting the suckers back on,
    > since the little glue pads seem to come off with them, can be hard), but what does one do with the
    > helmet? I've
    dipped
    > it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other techniques for cleaning
    > a helmet?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > --
    > Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply\

    I just hold the helmet under my kitchen faucet to rinse off the pads and straps. I then set it in
    the drain rack to dry. Takes 10 seconds, and gets rid of accumulated salt in the pads and nylon
    straps, and I don't have any problems with "stinky helmet".

    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.shastasoftware.com Developers of CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  4. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On 30 Jun 2003 17:00:30 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although :
    > getting the suckers back on, since the little glue pads seem to come off
    > : with them, can be hard), but what does one do with the helmet? I've
    > dipped : it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other : techniques for
    > cleaning a helmet?
    >
    > just throw the whole thing in the dishwasher with the waterbottles like luigi told me to do. works
    > great. maybe the chain, too.
    >
    > finally found a use for the dishwasher.

    I would, but I'm afraid that the Bosch dishwasher I have would get too hot (it heats the water to
    161F). However, maybe I could run it on a lower temperature cycle.

    --
    Bob M in CT remove 'x.' to reply
     
  5. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On 30 Jun 2003 17:00:30 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > I would, but I'm afraid that the Bosch dishwasher I have would get too hot (it heats the water to
    > 161F). However, maybe I could run it on a lower temperature cycle.
    >
    > --
    > Bob M in CT remove 'x.' to reply

    I think (hope?) David was being facetious. You shouldn't use any harsh cleaners on your helmet, and
    dishwashing soap is extremely harsh. Just run it under warm water and rinse it. The helmet is
    usually bonded to the shell in some way and if that bond is broken the helmet is less effective.

    Cheers,

    Scott...
     
  6. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 11:55:31 -0700, GaryG <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote:

    > "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although getting the suckers back
    >> on, since the little glue pads seem to come off with them, can be hard), but what does one do
    >> with the helmet? I've
    > dipped
    >> it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other techniques for cleaning a
    >> helmet?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> -- Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply\
    >
    > I just hold the helmet under my kitchen faucet to rinse off the pads and straps. I then set it in
    > the drain rack to dry. Takes 10 seconds, and gets rid of accumulated salt in the pads and nylon
    > straps, and I don't have any problems with "stinky helmet".
    >
    > ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.shastasoftware.com Developers of CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
    >
    >
    >

    That's a better idea than washing the pads separately, as they tend not to want to go back
    on. Thanks.

    --
    Bob M in CT remove 'x.' to reply
     
  7. If your helmet stinks, soak it if Fabrizio.
     
  8. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OK, I know that I can take the sweat pads off and wash them (although getting the suckers back on,
    > since the little glue pads seem to come off with them, can be hard), but what does one do with the
    > helmet? I've dipped it in a bucket of soapy water then rinsed it off. Are there any other
    > techniques for cleaning a helmet?

    Some ideas:

    1) Soak your helmet in a gallon of xylene, in a sealed metal container.

    2) A wire wheel on a bench grinder loosens contaminants nicely.

    3) Bake your helmet at 375F; it will stay clean on your keychain.

    4) Strap on a washable Raggedy Ann doll instead of a foam hat.

    5) Wear your "hydraulically damped" Camelbak on your head; clean as usual.

    Chalo Colina
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...