"Cycling": A Novel by Greg Garrett - weird terminology

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Wle, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Wle

    Wle Guest

    of course it;s not primarily about cycling. but the author
    claims to be a regular cyclist.

    and the main character rides by default kind of. his life is
    kind of going nowhere, after a good start, he is stalled out
    as a writer, can't get started on his 2nd book.

    his relationships seem to amble indifferently.

    the one constant thing he seems to do is bicycle.

    he rides a mountain bike, 30-40 miles a day even in west
    texas summers, even though by page 50 or so, he hasn't once
    gotten off the road.

    my technical question is terminology related.

    the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher and
    higher gears" when going up hills.

    obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" -
    easier to pedal.

    is there any way that his usage can be the right?

    i mean, is there any place in the world where they reverse
    the normal usage?

    anyway, it is a pretty good book, but i wondered about
    this..

    wle.
     
    Tags:


  2. On 11 Mar 2004 07:50:16 -0800, [email protected] (wle) wrote:

    >of course it;s not primarily about cycling. but the author
    >claims to be a regular cyclist.
    >
    >and the main character rides by default kind of. his life
    >is kind of going nowhere, after a good start, he is stalled
    >out as a writer, can't get started on his 2nd book.
    >
    >his relationships seem to amble indifferently.
    >
    >the one constant thing he seems to do is bicycle.
    >
    >he rides a mountain bike, 30-40 miles a day even in west
    >texas summers, even though by page 50 or so, he hasn't once
    >gotten off the road.
    >
    >my technical question is terminology related.
    >
    >the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher
    >and higher gears" when going up hills.
    >
    >obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" - easier
    >to pedal.

    No. the protagonist is obvioulsy so strong up the hill that
    he can actually accelerate--and in order to maintain a
    constant cadence, he upshifts.

    Weaker mortals like myself can do this on very gentle
    upgrades and false flats. Grimpeurs can do it up real hills.

    -Luigi
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > of course it;s not primarily about cycling. but the author
    > claims to be a regular cyclist.
    >
    > and the main character rides by default kind of. his
    > life is kind of going nowhere, after a good start, he
    > is stalled out as a writer, can't get started on his
    > 2nd book.
    >
    > his relationships seem to amble indifferently.
    >
    > the one constant thing he seems to do is bicycle.
    >
    > he rides a mountain bike, 30-40 miles a day even in west
    > texas summers, even though by page 50 or so, he hasn't
    > once gotten off the road.
    >
    > my technical question is terminology related.
    >
    > the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher
    > and higher gears" when going up hills.
    >
    > obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" -
    > easier to pedal.
    >
    > is there any way that his usage can be the right?
    >
    > i mean, is there any place in the world where they reverse
    > the normal usage?

    Maybe he just wants to see how tall of a gear he can push
    up the hill?

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in
    the newsgroups if possible).
     
  4. Wle

    Wle Guest

    > >
    > > i mean, is there any place in the world where they
    > > reverse the normal usage?
    >
    > Maybe he just wants to see how tall of a gear he can push
    > up the hill?

    ha ha.

    well if one writes fiction, the characters can be as manly
    as the author likes..

    still i doubt that is what he meant, i just think he mistook
    high for low.

    anyway, i emailed the author, i will report his answer if
    he answers.

    wle.
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    11 Mar 2004 14:31:59 -0800,
    <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (wle) wrote:

    >> >
    >> > i mean, is there any place in the world where they
    >> > reverse the normal usage?
    >>
    >> Maybe he just wants to see how tall of a gear he can push
    >> up the hill?
    >
    >ha ha.
    >
    >well if one writes fiction, the characters can be as manly
    >as the author likes..
    >
    >still i doubt that is what he meant, i just think he
    >mistook high for low.
    >
    >anyway, i emailed the author, i will report his answer if
    >he answers.
    >
    >wle.
    My guess it that he wasn't shifting into ever higher gears
    during a single climb but that eventually through addtional
    conditioning he was able to now pedal a taller gear on hills
    that had previously had him grabbing for the granny.
    --
    zk
     
  6. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > >
    > > > i mean, is there any place in the world where they
    > > > reverse the normal usage?
    > >
    > > Maybe he just wants to see how tall of a gear he can
    > > push up the hill?
    >
    > ha ha.
    >
    > well if one writes fiction, the characters can be as manly
    > as the author likes..
    >
    > still i doubt that is what he meant, i just think he
    > mistook high for low.

    Probably.

    > anyway, i emailed the author, i will report his answer if
    > he answers.
    >
    > wle.

    That would be interesting to hear.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return
    address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  7. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 11 Mar 2004 07:50:16 -0800, [email protected] (wle) wrote:
    >the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher
    >and higher gears" when going up hills.
    >
    >obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" - easier
    >to pedal.
    >
    >is there any way that his usage can be the right?
    >
    >i mean, is there any place in the world where they reverse
    >the normal usage?

    Are you sure he was shifting to easier gears? Maybe he was
    getting stronger and going faster.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  8. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "wle" <[email protected]or.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher
    > and higher gears" when going up hills.
    >
    > obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" -
    > easier to pedal.
    >
    > is there any way that his usage can be the right?
    >
    The usage isn't correct, but I have heard this usage from
    people on bicycles before.

    You have to remember that, in motor vehicles, many people
    have never had to change gears. They have had automatic
    transmissions all their lives. They may also have avoided
    high school physics, or forgotten it.

    I asked somebody about that once, and they replied that
    they thought the hill-climbing gears were "higher" gears
    because you had to pedal at a higher rate for the same
    amount of speed. Then they admitted they were always
    unclear on the subject.
     
  9. Wle

    Wle Guest

    > anyway, i emailed the author, i will report his answer if
    > he answers.
    >
    well!

    he already wrote back and said, yes i am right, it should be
    'lower gears' - he will correct it in the paperback and
    later editions. he was quite nice about it.

    wle.

    > wle.
     
  10. Whinds

    Whinds Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (wle) writes:

    >
    >my technical question is terminology related.
    >
    >the author has twice now referred to shifting to "higher
    >and higher gears" when going up hills.
    >
    >obviously he means what i would call "lower gears" - easier
    >to pedal.
    >
    >is there any way that his usage can be the right?
    >
    >i mean, is there any place in the world where they reverse
    >the normal usage?
    >
    >anyway, it is a pretty good book, but i wondered
    >about this..
    >

    Well when I started out I did the smallest hills in the
    lowest gear and as I got better I shifted higher and higher.
    Now, I look for bigger hills.<g
     
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