For Brian!! - Don't have a cow!!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by ST, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. ST

    ST Guest

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar21news

    Don't have a cow
    How a farmer's brew affects riders health

    By Susan Westemeyer

    Did you ever wonder why so many riders come down with stomach problems after
    the various spring races in Belgium? One might suspect it's the effect of
    bouncing up and down so long on cobblestones, but the truth of the matter is
    much more... natural, one might say. It's all due to the cow manure, says
    T-Mobile's team doctor, Stefan Voigt.

    "Last year in late March, Flanders experienced a spell of mild weather,
    prompting many farmers to spread manure on their fields. However, the good
    weather didn't hold and heavy rainfall during the 'Dreidaagse von de Panne'
    (three to five days before the Tour of Flanders) caused the manure to run
    off the fields and onto a few hundred metres of the race route," he explains
    on the team's website.

    And how does the cow manure work its magic on the riders? "When the riders
    sped through these stretches, the excrement sprayed out in all directions --
    onto the riders' faces and onto the mouthpieces of their water bottles.
    Consequently, when a rider took a swig from his bottle, he also unwittingly
    swallowed millions of E-coli bacteria. Within 12 hours of the E-coli
    contamination, the riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting and
    diarrhea."

    The solution? "Let's hope for cool and dry weather... so that the farmers
    'dangerous brew' is frozen, or at least doesn't run off onto the race
    route."
     
    Tags:


  2. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "ST" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:C044BF84.19F0D8%[email protected]
    >
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar21news
    >
    > Don't have a cow
    > How a farmer's brew affects riders health
    >
    > By Susan Westemeyer
    >
    > Did you ever wonder why so many riders come down with stomach problems
    > after
    > the various spring races in Belgium? One might suspect it's the effect of
    > bouncing up and down so long on cobblestones, but the truth of the matter
    > is
    > much more... natural, one might say. It's all due to the cow manure, says
    > T-Mobile's team doctor, Stefan Voigt.
    >
    > "Last year in late March, Flanders experienced a spell of mild weather,
    > prompting many farmers to spread manure on their fields. However, the good
    > weather didn't hold and heavy rainfall during the 'Dreidaagse von de
    > Panne'
    > (three to five days before the Tour of Flanders) caused the manure to run
    > off the fields and onto a few hundred metres of the race route," he
    > explains
    > on the team's website.
    >
    > And how does the cow manure work its magic on the riders? "When the riders
    > sped through these stretches, the excrement sprayed out in all
    > directions --
    > onto the riders' faces and onto the mouthpieces of their water bottles.
    > Consequently, when a rider took a swig from his bottle, he also
    > unwittingly
    > swallowed millions of E-coli bacteria. Within 12 hours of the E-coli
    > contamination, the riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting and
    > diarrhea."
    >
    > The solution? "Let's hope for cool and dry weather... so that the farmers
    > 'dangerous brew' is frozen, or at least doesn't run off onto the race
    > route."
    >


    In Bob Roll's first book he wrote about this at length. Check it out.
    Quite funny.
     
  3. On 03/21/2006 04:28 AM, in article
    [email protected], "B. Lafferty"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "ST" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:C044BF84.19F0D8%[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar21news
    >>
    >> Don't have a cow
    >> How a farmer's brew affects riders health
    >>
    >> By Susan Westemeyer
    >>
    >> Did you ever wonder why so many riders come down with stomach problems
    >> after
    >> the various spring races in Belgium? One might suspect it's the effect of
    >> bouncing up and down so long on cobblestones, but the truth of the matter
    >> is
    >> much more... natural, one might say. It's all due to the cow manure, says
    >> T-Mobile's team doctor, Stefan Voigt.
    >>
    >> "Last year in late March, Flanders experienced a spell of mild weather,
    >> prompting many farmers to spread manure on their fields. However, the good
    >> weather didn't hold and heavy rainfall during the 'Dreidaagse von de
    >> Panne'
    >> (three to five days before the Tour of Flanders) caused the manure to run
    >> off the fields and onto a few hundred metres of the race route," he
    >> explains
    >> on the team's website.
    >>
    >> And how does the cow manure work its magic on the riders? "When the riders
    >> sped through these stretches, the excrement sprayed out in all
    >> directions --
    >> onto the riders' faces and onto the mouthpieces of their water bottles.
    >> Consequently, when a rider took a swig from his bottle, he also
    >> unwittingly
    >> swallowed millions of E-coli bacteria. Within 12 hours of the E-coli
    >> contamination, the riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting and
    >> diarrhea."
    >>
    >> The solution? "Let's hope for cool and dry weather... so that the farmers
    >> 'dangerous brew' is frozen, or at least doesn't run off onto the race
    >> route."
    >>

    >
    > In Bob Roll's first book he wrote about this at length. Check it out.
    > Quite funny.



    It will be in his second book as well, since it contains the entirety of the
    first book, plus a few more stories.

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield
    stevens at veloworks dot com
    bellum pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est
    ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea eye tee why you ti ay aitch
    aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you
    double-yew double-ewe dot flahute dot com [foreword] slash
     
  4. I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from the
    fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in front of
    you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean mud on your
    face, boy. That's cow crap.

    Mark VandenBerghe


    "ST" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:C044BF84.19F0D8%[email protected]
    >
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar21news
    >
    > Don't have a cow
    > How a farmer's brew affects riders health
    >
    > By Susan Westemeyer
    >
    > Did you ever wonder why so many riders come down with stomach problems
    > after
    > the various spring races in Belgium? One might suspect it's the effect of
    > bouncing up and down so long on cobblestones, but the truth of the matter
    > is
    > much more... natural, one might say. It's all due to the cow manure, says
    > T-Mobile's team doctor, Stefan Voigt.
    >
    > "Last year in late March, Flanders experienced a spell of mild weather,
    > prompting many farmers to spread manure on their fields. However, the good
    > weather didn't hold and heavy rainfall during the 'Dreidaagse von de
    > Panne'
    > (three to five days before the Tour of Flanders) caused the manure to run
    > off the fields and onto a few hundred metres of the race route," he
    > explains
    > on the team's website.
    >
    > And how does the cow manure work its magic on the riders? "When the riders
    > sped through these stretches, the excrement sprayed out in all
    > directions --
    > onto the riders' faces and onto the mouthpieces of their water bottles.
    > Consequently, when a rider took a swig from his bottle, he also
    > unwittingly
    > swallowed millions of E-coli bacteria. Within 12 hours of the E-coli
    > contamination, the riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting and
    > diarrhea."
    >
    > The solution? "Let's hope for cool and dry weather... so that the farmers
    > 'dangerous brew' is frozen, or at least doesn't run off onto the race
    > route."
    >
     
  5. > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >
    > Mark VandenBerghe



    Having ridden the streets of Paris in the rain, I've had the opportunity to
    consider that it could be worse (than cow crap, that is).

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >
    > Mark VandenBerghe
    >
    >
    > "ST" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:C044BF84.19F0D8%[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar21news
    >>
    >> Don't have a cow
    >> How a farmer's brew affects riders health
    >>
    >> By Susan Westemeyer
    >>
    >> Did you ever wonder why so many riders come down with stomach problems
    >> after
    >> the various spring races in Belgium? One might suspect it's the effect of
    >> bouncing up and down so long on cobblestones, but the truth of the matter
    >> is
    >> much more... natural, one might say. It's all due to the cow manure, says
    >> T-Mobile's team doctor, Stefan Voigt.
    >>
    >> "Last year in late March, Flanders experienced a spell of mild weather,
    >> prompting many farmers to spread manure on their fields. However, the
    >> good
    >> weather didn't hold and heavy rainfall during the 'Dreidaagse von de
    >> Panne'
    >> (three to five days before the Tour of Flanders) caused the manure to run
    >> off the fields and onto a few hundred metres of the race route," he
    >> explains
    >> on the team's website.
    >>
    >> And how does the cow manure work its magic on the riders? "When the
    >> riders
    >> sped through these stretches, the excrement sprayed out in all
    >> directions --
    >> onto the riders' faces and onto the mouthpieces of their water bottles.
    >> Consequently, when a rider took a swig from his bottle, he also
    >> unwittingly
    >> swallowed millions of E-coli bacteria. Within 12 hours of the E-coli
    >> contamination, the riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting
    >> and
    >> diarrhea."
    >>
    >> The solution? "Let's hope for cool and dry weather... so that the farmers
    >> 'dangerous brew' is frozen, or at least doesn't run off onto the race
    >> route."
    >>

    >
    >
     
  6. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >
    > Mark VandenBerghe


    Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as good
    for your health as natural cow shit. :)
     
  7. About 20 guys in my club got sick this way a couple years ago -- we
    had a training race on wet roads with a lot of horse manure on one
    section, and we all got stomach problems over the next few days. I
    had it mild. At least one guy went to the hospital for a IV to
    re-hydrate.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  8. On 03/21/2006 02:19 PM, in article
    [email protected], "B. Lafferty"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    >> Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    >> California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    >> the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    >> front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    >> mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >>
    >> Mark VandenBerghe

    >
    > Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as good
    > for your health as natural cow shit. :)




    Based on personal experience from racing Snelling in 1996-97, and seeing the
    huge number of cows lining the course, I'd say that Lafferty's showing his
    ignorance again.



    --
    Steven L. Sheffield
    stevens at veloworks dot com
    bellum pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est
    ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea eye tee why you ti ay aitch
    aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you
    double-yew double-ewe dot flahute dot com [foreword] slash
     
  9. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    B. Lafferty wrote:
    > "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    > >
    > > Mark VandenBerghe

    >
    > Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as good
    > for your health as natural cow shit. :)


    Maybe it was just me, but growing up doing a dairy that was milking
    300 head I was surrounded by, and frequently covered with shit. I never
    got sick from it, even when I missed a step into the barn and ended up
    swimming in the shit pit in February, the good thing was that at least
    it was warm. I could see riders really sucking it down in wet
    conditions though and that causing problems though.
    We were incredibly cheap/careful with fertilizers, but they worried me
    a lot more than anything else from the health standpoint. If the
    animals have eaten shit overdosed with nasty chemicals the organic
    product they produce is going to be toxic too. That's a thought to keep
    in mind. We had to be incredibly careful with animals undergoing
    medical treatment so as not to taint the milk with things like
    antibiotics since they tested everyload we sent in to the co-op. and
    dumped without paying for anything contaminated.
    Bill C
     
  10. Steve .

    Steve . Guest

    If Brian had Cancer he would skip the treatments because animals were used
    for lab testing during the development. I am sure that a farm boy / pro
    racer would not be as likely to get sick from it since there system has been
    exposed to it before. Hmmm Floyd ?

    Maybe Bjarne ought to have his boys shovel manure in the offseason.
    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    > >
    > > Mark VandenBerghe

    >
    > Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as

    good
    > for your health as natural cow shit. :)
    >
    >
     
  11. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    > >
    > > Mark VandenBerghe

    >
    > Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as good
    > for your health as natural cow shit. :)


    Didn't John Tomac pick up a fairly bad bug of some sort from drinking off a
    water bottle in a mountain bike race in Hawaii? I seem to recall something about
    the bottle having been sprayed with whatever came off the front wheel of his
    bike going through a cow field.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Grandma Smith said a curious thing
    Boys must whistle, girls must sing

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  12. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Steve ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If Brian had Cancer he would skip the treatments because animals were used
    > for lab testing during the development. I am sure that a farm boy / pro
    > racer would not be as likely to get sick from it since there system has
    > been
    > exposed to it before. Hmmm Floyd ?
    >
    > Maybe Bjarne ought to have his boys shovel manure in the offseason.
    > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and
    >> > Snelling
    >> > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    >> > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff
    >> > from
    >> > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    >> > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    >> > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >> >
    >> > Mark VandenBerghe

    >>
    >> Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as

    > good
    >> for your health as natural cow shit. :)

    ROTFL!!
     
  13. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Howard Kveck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and
    >> > Snelling
    >> > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    >> > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff
    >> > from
    >> > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    >> > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    >> > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >> >
    >> > Mark VandenBerghe

    >>
    >> Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as
    >> good
    >> for your health as natural cow shit. :)

    >
    > Didn't John Tomac pick up a fairly bad bug of some sort from drinking
    > off a
    > water bottle in a mountain bike race in Hawaii? I seem to recall something
    > about
    > the bottle having been sprayed with whatever came off the front wheel of
    > his
    > bike going through a cow field.
    >
    > --
    > tanx,
    > Howard


    What's a mountain bike?!
     
  14. routebeer

    routebeer Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and Snelling
    > > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    > > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff from
    > > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    > > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    > > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    > >
    > > Mark VandenBerghe

    >
    >
    > Having ridden the streets of Paris in the rain, I've had the opportunity

    to
    > consider that it could be worse (than cow crap, that is).


    Excrement in the streets? Sounds like the French are still living in the
    Middle Ages to me.
     
  15. >> Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as
    >> good
    >> for your health as natural cow shit. :)

    >
    > Maybe it was just me, but growing up doing a dairy that was milking
    > 300 head I was surrounded by, and frequently covered with shit. I never
    > got sick from it, even when I missed a step into the barn and ended up
    > swimming in the shit pit in February, the good thing was that at least
    > it was warm. I could see riders really sucking it down in wet
    > conditions though and that causing problems though.
    > We were incredibly cheap/careful with fertilizers, but they worried me
    > a lot more than anything else from the health standpoint. If the
    > animals have eaten shit overdosed with nasty chemicals the organic
    > product they produce is going to be toxic too. That's a thought to keep
    > in mind. We had to be incredibly careful with animals undergoing
    > medical treatment so as not to taint the milk with things like
    > antibiotics since they tested everyload we sent in to the co-op. and
    > dumped without paying for anything contaminated.
    > Bill C


    Bill: I always thought you were one of the more "real" posters on rbr. This
    only confirms it. And I mean that, sincerely, as a compliment.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > B. Lafferty wrote:
    >> "Mark VandenBerghe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > I've always said the same thing after racing Mclane Pacific and
    >> > Snelling
    >> > Road Races each spring. These races are run through farmlands in
    >> > California's Central valley, often in rainy conditions. The runoff
    >> > from
    >> > the fields spreads all kinds of muck across the roads and the wheel in
    >> > front of you sprays your face for several hours. That ain't good clean
    >> > mud on your face, boy. That's cow crap.
    >> >
    >> > Mark VandenBerghe

    >>
    >> Probably isn't. More likely it's commercial fertilizer which is not as
    >> good
    >> for your health as natural cow shit. :)

    >
    > Maybe it was just me, but growing up doing a dairy that was milking
    > 300 head I was surrounded by, and frequently covered with shit. I never
    > got sick from it, even when I missed a step into the barn and ended up
    > swimming in the shit pit in February, the good thing was that at least
    > it was warm. I could see riders really sucking it down in wet
    > conditions though and that causing problems though.
    > We were incredibly cheap/careful with fertilizers, but they worried me
    > a lot more than anything else from the health standpoint. If the
    > animals have eaten shit overdosed with nasty chemicals the organic
    > product they produce is going to be toxic too. That's a thought to keep
    > in mind. We had to be incredibly careful with animals undergoing
    > medical treatment so as not to taint the milk with things like
    > antibiotics since they tested everyload we sent in to the co-op. and
    > dumped without paying for anything contaminated.
    > Bill C
    >
    >
     
Loading...
Loading...