For Christmas My Mother Purchased for Me The Pearl Izumi’s Road Bicycle Shoes Called 'Windsource'

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by GreatWhiteShark, Jan 6, 2014.

  1. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    For Christmas My Mother Purchased for Me The Pearl Izumi’s Road Bicycle Shoes Called 'Windsource' And I have A Fit And Comfortability Issue. I would rather not have to ask, my mother, let alone require her involvement, to exchange another bicycle gift, from Christmas; bicycle pants were too tight. I do not in any way want to seem ungrateful. I do not drive and do not have any faith in the 10-miles away bicycle shop, thus I bring this E-Mail to you. When I first thought about the gift, I was thinking that the shoes attachment petal system was supposed to be in the box, but was not. The shoe’s manual made such a big deal about it. Later, I decided I need to try it out first, before making such an assumption. I read and studied their Cleat installation instructions, Road & Care & Maintenance sections of The Shoe Manuel, after experiencing the following problems, the first few times I used the shoes. The shoes do not seem to fit my standard bicycle petals, specifically the shoes' attachment area for The Cleat parts, and causes my feet to slip off the petals. There was no ability to install The Cleat parts because they were never with my ‘The Windsource' shoes. Since, I have no the shoes' attachment area for The Cleat parts, attached to petals, I am not complaining about never having any Cleats parts with ‘The Windsource’ shoes. I do not know if my standardized bicycle petals, no parts to keep the bicycle shoes attached to the petals, fit into “Pearl Izumi shoes have been tested with several of the most popular clipless pedal systems." I think not, because I believe my standardized bicycle petals, no parts to keep the bicycle shoes attached to the petals, do not fit into the definition of a clipless petal system, even with The Cleat parts removed. Will 'The Windsource' bicycle shoes ever work (comfortable and stay on the petals) with my standardized bicycle petals, no parts to keep the bicycle shoes attached to the petals?? There was no ability to install The Cleat parts because they were never with my ‘The Windsource' shoes. Since, I have no the shoes' attachment area for The Cleat parts, attached to petals, I am not complaining about never having any Cleats parts with ‘The Windsource’ shoes. I like having the ability in the future to get the shoes' attachment area for The Cleat parts, attached to petals and ‘The Windsource’s Cleat Parts, when my dream of moving and living in mountain areas of State of Washington and Denmark or similar European Country become reality.
     
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  2. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Can you include pictures of the bottom of the shoe (showing the drill holes) and the pedal? While pearl izumi makes shoes, I could not find any "windsource" on the web.

    There are many different clipless pedals, you don't indicate which. Without a specific brand, or a photo it would be difficult for anyone to assist.
     
  3. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    danfoz,
    I will do it for you, but my camera is from my outdated cellphone, I do not do the latest cellphone stuff, thus, people complain about The PICs quality. The PICs will display all the information provided and the only name I can find for the shoes are 'Windsource', printed on the back of the manual.
     
  4. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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  5. steve

    steve Administrator
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    Hi there

    It might be better to add them using the 'insert image' icon, they'll show up as thumbnails instead.

    regards
     
  6. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    I have one last question, as I have never had, let alone used, such equipment. I am not completely sure whether to keep (for when I eventually move to a place that is not flat) or just return them, but leaning to keeping them. Right now, I do not think I will use them, I do not like the idea of having my feet attached to the petals, in case of emergencies; really saw no need for such shoes. Does using these shoes (and buying the petals and shoe attachment) really make a difference for when riding in mountains and large hills?
     
  7. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    [​IMG]
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    Thanks Steve, I was trying to do it fast, got hop on my bike.
     
  8. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    GreatWhite,
    it looks like your shoe accepts both Shimano style cleats: the mountain style (2-bolt) SPD, as well as the SPD-sl (3-bolt) road style cleat.

    [​IMG]
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    The 3 bolt has a larger patch which some find more stable and the 2 bolt is typically found on mountain bike shoes with a recessed cleat (see first pic). You'll note the mountain cleat is metal and on your shoe it doesn't look like there are bolsters on the side so those wont be friendly on wooden floors, and also may be more slippery on smooth surfaces. The 3-bolt cleat (SPD-sl) has rubber pads so not so bad walking on surfaces.

    They are pretty easy to get in and out of, just require a little practice, but all it takes is moving the heel out and you pop right out. Many riders have keeled over at some point in their riding careers at a red light because they weren't thinking about it but it becomes second nature pretty quick. Cheap pedals for each will probably run about $50-70:

    Road style: http://www.rei.com/product/710073/shimano-r540-spd-sl-road-pedals

    Mountain style: http://www.rei.com/product/668198/shimano-m324-spd-pedals (I'd personally go for something like this as a beginner)

    And a set of either cleats about $20 (although cleats are sometimes included). There are many different pedals that'll work I just included 2 examples.

    The mountain style often have a larger pedal platform so if you just want to ride in sneakers and not use the cycling shoes it's not a problem. It looks like you have a mountain bike so I would go with the mountain pedal and cleat setup, just remember to take the shoes of before going in the house or your mum might not be to happy if you scratch up the floors :)

    Unless I am just taking a quick ride to the corner store I always prefer to be locked into the pedal. If the shoes fit, hold onto them as one day if you get more serious about riding you might wan to take the plunge.

    Lastly, the cleats do allow you feet to rotate slightly on the pedal but you'll want to position so your feet are roughly in a forward facing direction when neutrally positioned, and so that you are pushing down through the ball of your foot, they shouldn't be all the way by the toes, or too far back under the arch. There are many good resources on how to position cleats on the web, or someone at a bike shop can help. if doing yourself you can always come back to the forum for help, but as with any bolt on your bike you should grease it before installing and not over-tighten to avoid stripping the bolt.
     
  9. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    danfoz,

    Thanks for the information, that was what I was considering a problem, walking with them is hazardous. We have those uneven tile floors, luckily no wooden floors and I have really sensitive feet.

    Yeah, the shoes fit my feet; I bike about 12.5-miles on average weekday, with a ton of hazards. That is why, now that I think about, I do not understand why my mother gave them to me as a gift, now. She must not be a good listener, I have told her about THE BLANKING drivers.

    Yeah, that is another concern is that I have had server surgeries on both of my feet, with lifelong consequences, thus, putting pressure on the toes, of my feet, for long time* can cause a lot pain. I really only use the balls of my feet when I am in a hurry to get home, thus less time on them.

    If I do keep them, I would use Internet help; because where I live bicycle shops suck. I agree with the greasing point and over-tightening points.

    *- What is long time depends upon the state of my feet at the time.
     
  10. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    The good thing about those shoes is the stiff soles so they'll transfer the pressure from the cleat across the whole foot. Keep us posted.
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Note that it's okay to use a black font. The biggest advantage to clipless pedals is that they make you feel more secure on the bike and they can improve bike handling, especially on things like twisty mountain descents. As for emergencies, clipless pedals are like ski bindings in that they release your foot in an accident.
     
  12. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    The advantage of being somewhat stuck to the pedals comes in two different primary categories:

    -With platform pedals, you need to keep a bit of downward pressure on the upward pedal just to keep your foot in place.
    That downward pressure on the upward bound pedal is countering the work you're doing with the downward-bound leg, which, when fractions count, isn't such a hot idea.
    Being clipped in allows you to lift the upward bound leg by its own power, and still keeping your foot positioned on the pedal, which improves efficiency a little bit.
    It is also possible to add a bit of power by deliberately pulling on the upward bound pedal.
    While handy occasionally, it's not something you should try to make a career of, as the anatomy of the leg isn't really suitable for repeated heavy lifting from the foot.

    -If you're being bounced around on the bike - as MTBers are likely to be, being clipped in reduces the risk of your foot accidentally slipping off the pedal and robbing you of forward power.

    Don't really know what you mean by "emergencies".
    I usually feel safer being clipped in as I know my feet won't come off accidentally. Only times I'll unclip beforehand is if I'm about to take a corner with high risk of sliding, or if I'm tackling a really slow and technically challenging section where I might stall out at any moment. For urban commuting, riding clipped in is a no-brainer.
    Haven't used road cleats much, but the MTB cleats will disengage w/o any drama in case you go over anyhow, so not an issue.

    And yeah, most riders will have had an embarrassing topple or two when they've come to a complete stop before unclipping. Or unclipping one shoe, then toppling to the other side.
    It'll usually bruise your ego more than anything else.
    Some pedals can be set for different amounts of retention force, but I've never found it to be a problem. The body will learn the routine of "heel out", preferably at the bottom of the stroke quick enough.
     
  13. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Actually no... They wont... and here's my [email protected]' spreadsheet:

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    Allthough I should probably add that the injury had nothing to do with the clipless system. The injury occured when after taking a turn on a slippery road (it had just started raining) at around 30km/h I slipped on the side, then after sliding on my rear's side for a while (the one Alienator likes so much:)...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alienator .

    I ♥ Volnix's rear! [​IMG]

    ... I unclipped from the pedals and then when the bike went on it's own way, I hit the road with my elbow...

    Volnix Drago: Goodbye Mr. Alienator. [​IMG]

    Btw GreatWhiteShark your posting style gives me the creeps... "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" - like the creeps... [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Forget about being robbed of forward power, as a kid a I distinctly remember my shin being slammed a multitude of times by the pedal after hitting a bad bump and loosing my footing.
     
  15. GreatWhiteShark

    GreatWhiteShark New Member

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    Hey, guys,

    You are right, what I mean by emergencies are dealing with other people on the road and trying to avoid and deal with accidents. Which I have been lucky that even though I am by myself (all police and authorities have better things to do, leave at that, posted about that a lot at www.bikeforums.com) I have only had 3 of them. One were, driver's rage, I really skinned up my knee. Yes, I have banged my shins many times; but with the situation with my feet their pain is like a flea, heck I never really felt the badly skinned up knee.

    My feet surgeries were top 5 of the state for the entire year, 1-entire year in casts, basically aligned my feet's bones. I was trying to be a high school BasketBall player, as i was before High School, before the surgeries, so much pain reason they were discovered. After surgeries, I used to run (months practice no problem; used to be good at long distance) during the 3.5K tendons in my balls of my feet blew up, shoes were barely holding the swelling in, finished, because knew when I would stop I was done. Later for fun running 2-miles, (making real good times) partly tore my Achilles tendon from where it attaches to back of the foot. That is just the worse damages, after the surgeries, what I am really worried about is that when I use the feet's different muscles too much they quickly start to ache and then quickly get to knife like sharp pains, especially in my heels and balls of my feet. That is why I am also worried about having my feet in the balls of my feet position and not adjustable.

    Sorry, I guess I should have just stated that concerns to begin with.
     
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