Friend new to cycle commuting

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by [email protected], Dec 11, 2004.

  1. A good friend of mine has moved recently and is now 12km's from his
    place of work. He lives in Upwey and works in Scoresby; apparently
    there's a pretty good cycle path he can use.

    He's pretty much a couch potato and keen to do something about it.
    Naturally I want to do as much as I can to make the transition to car
    bound couch potato to freedom machine enjoying cyclist as painless as
    possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he should
    sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please comment :)

    Bike, not been used much since he's got it so get it serviced
    professionally.

    Equipment needed, just to get started:

    High visibility vest or similar

    Sun block

    Sunnies

    Water bottle

    Wash kit and towel to leave at work

    Puncture kit

    Tire levers

    Spare tubes

    Lights

    Equipment if he gets in to it:

    SPD pedals and shoes

    Panniers

    Skills:

    Ensure you know how to change your inner tube before you need to do it
    in anger, practice practice practice.

    Cadence, fast light pedaling.

    Read cycling related road rules available from
    http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrne...6EC900144F1A-DE5F0BE6035DEB4ACA256BB900267CF8

    Stretch after ride, examples:
    http://www.velogirls.com/stretching_photos.html
    --
    Cheers
    Euan
     
    Tags:


  2. DRS

    DRS Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]

    [...]

    > possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he should
    > sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please comment :)


    I didn't see a lock.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  3. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

    >
    > I didn't see a lock.
    >
    > --
    >
    > A: Top-posters.
    > Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
    >


    and a helmet

    and gloves

    and a pump.

    and a 'puter.

    and ....

    hang on, we don't want to scare him off. Just get him on the bike with the
    bare minimum. Tell him its easy and he doesn't need anything more than what
    he's probably already got.

    Get him hooked first and THEN reel him in. JOIN USssss JOIN USssssss

    Flaps.
     
  4. hippy

    hippy Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > He's pretty much a couch potato and keen to do something about it.
    > Naturally I want to do as much as I can to make the transition to car
    > bound couch potato to freedom machine enjoying cyclist as painless as
    > possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he should
    > sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please comment :)


    Not wanting to see AFHT (another f'ing helmet thread),
    would he be wanting a helmet?

    Is he going to be carrying his clothes to work?
    Does he need a backpack?

    Does he have access to a shower?

    > Puncture kit
    > Tire levers
    > Spare tubes


    Saddlebag or similar to hold these?

    What sort of bike does he have? Does it need to
    be slicked up? Gearing suitable for him and any
    hills - we don't want him crying when he can't climb
    that first hill..

    > Equipment if he gets in to it:
    > SPD pedals and shoes


    :)

    > Panniers


    Ptooie! ;-)

    > Ensure you know how to change your inner tube before you need to do it
    > in anger, practice practice practice.


    Teach him how to repair the tubes too, so he's not up
    for $7+ every tube.
    Show him how to correctly inflate tyres to suitable pressure.
    Driveline maintenance/lubrication?

    hth
    hippy
     
  5. >>>>> "drs" == drs <[email protected]> writes:

    drs> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    drs> news:[email protected] [...]

    >> possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he
    >> should sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please
    >> comment :)


    drs> I didn't see a lock.

    Thanks, he's got a secure location at work to store the bike but I don't
    know if he's got a lock.
    --
    Cheers
    Euan
     
  6. >>>>> "flaps" == flaps <[email protected]> writes:

    flaps> and a helmet

    Covered.

    flaps> and gloves

    Good one, thanks.

    flaps> and a pump.

    Thought that'd be covered in puncture kit, be good for him to get a
    track pump though.

    flaps> and a 'puter.

    For commuting? I've not felt the need for a cycle computer although I
    do use a HRM. What are the benefits of fitting a cycle computer to the
    bike? And what would you recommend for a commuter?

    flaps> hang on, we don't want to scare him off. Just get him on the
    flaps> bike with the bare minimum. Tell him its easy and he doesn't
    flaps> need anything more than what he's probably already got.

    flaps> Get him hooked first and THEN reel him in. JOIN USssss JOIN
    flaps> USssssss

    Hee hee, softly softly catchee monkey :)
    --
    Cheers
    Euan
     
  7. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 at 03:26 GMT, hippy (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> He's pretty much a couch potato and keen to do something about it.
    >> Naturally I want to do as much as I can to make the transition to car
    >> bound couch potato to freedom machine enjoying cyclist as painless as
    >> possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he should
    >> sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please comment :)

    >
    > Not wanting to see AFHT (another f'ing helmet thread),
    > would he be wanting a helmet?
    >
    > Is he going to be carrying his clothes to work?
    > Does he need a backpack?


    I was thinking panniers straight off, not waiting to see whether you
    will indeed take commuting up. It makes life so much easier, and
    commuting so much more enjoyable[1]. Hence it will make you more
    likely to keep going at it. Maybe don't bother with the $200 dollar
    set though, just yet (although they *really* are waterproof, as I
    found out when that insane rain went through last week).

    But the suggestion of SPDs once you know you will keep commuting --
    for a commuter, what is wrong with toe-clips? So much cheaper, and
    more convenient. In fact, you might as well get the toe clips now, if
    you don't already.

    >> Equipment if he gets in to it:
    >> SPD pedals and shoes

    >
    >:)
    >
    >> Panniers

    >
    > Ptooie! ;-)


    Oh. Shut up :)

    [1] I used to very carefully have to plan my shopping, and if I needed
    kitty litter or icecream (and the latter is always very urgent, and
    needs to be frequently bought), then I couldn't get anything else
    largish. The other night, I had to get both, and a whole bunch of
    other shopping, and it all fit in one pannier. This is handy, because
    the shop is on the way home, and at the top of a hill - I don't want
    to have to go back there if I ran out of room first time.

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    A bug in the code is worth two in the documentation. --unk
     
  8. hippy

    hippy Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > flaps> and a 'puter.
    > For commuting? I've not felt the need for a cycle computer although I
    > do use a HRM. What are the benefits of fitting a cycle computer to the
    > bike? And what would you recommend for a commuter?


    A cheap one. It can be useful motivation..

    Dude: Hey missus, I've ridden over 100k this week!
    Missus: That's nice dear.

    Okay, bad example, but I used to use my computer
    to brag about all kinds of stats (in my mind). I'd see
    how fast I could do my commute, see what my
    fastest speed was, highest average speed, how many
    kays I could do in a day.. all that kind of stuff. Maybe
    it only applies to me coz I like stats but I think quite a
    few other people take the same interest in their own
    performance. If he can measure himself and notice he's
    getting faster - he must be getting fitter (or cheating) so
    he's healthier.. etc..etc.. so riding rocks.. so he becomes
    addicted.. buys lots of bike stuff.. starts posting here..
    gets other friends addicted.. cars are no longer needed
    because everyone is riding.. the world is a happy place..

    hippy
     
  9. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "TimC" <[email protected]
    > I was thinking panniers straight off, not waiting to see whether you
    > will indeed take commuting up. It makes life so much easier, and
    > commuting so much more enjoyable[1]. Hence it will make you more
    > likely to keep going at it. Maybe don't bother with the $200 dollar
    > set though, just yet (although they *really* are waterproof, as I
    > found out when that insane rain went through last week).


    While I'm selling all my crap.. I have a set of cheaper
    panniers and a rack here that someone might want to buy?

    > But the suggestion of SPDs once you know you will keep commuting --
    > for a commuter, what is wrong with toe-clips? So much cheaper, and
    > more convenient. In fact, you might as well get the toe clips now, if
    > you don't already.


    Hmm.. if anything I'd go for SPD as soon as possible, having
    done the flats->toe-clip->spd transition. Maybe get the flat+spd
    pedals so he can use either cycling shoes or normal shoes.
    Initially straps 'are' a cheap option, but for them to work
    properly you need them tight and most newbs wont do that,
    in which case they may as well have plain flat pedals.

    > >> Panniers

    > >
    > > Ptooie! ;-)

    >
    > Oh. Shut up :)


    Oooh TimC uses panniers.. nyer nyer TimC uses panniers.. nyer ;-P

    > [1] I used to very carefully have to plan my shopping, and if I needed
    > kitty litter or icecream (and the latter is always very urgent, and
    > needs to be frequently bought), then I couldn't get anything else


    Which reminds me.. I need to get something from the freezer..
    back in a jiffy..

    > largish. The other night, I had to get both, and a whole bunch of
    > other shopping, and it all fit in one pannier. This is handy, because
    > the shop is on the way home, and at the top of a hill - I don't want
    > to have to go back there if I ran out of room first time.


    But, more riding = good ;-)

    I think my bag is actually bigger than one of my panniers..
    certainly looks cooler hehe ;-)

    hippy
     
  10. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 at 04:30 GMT, hippy (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > "TimC" <tco[email protected]
    >> [1] I used to very carefully have to plan my shopping, and if I needed
    >> kitty litter or icecream (and the latter is always very urgent, and
    >> needs to be frequently bought), then I couldn't get anything else

    >
    > Which reminds me.. I need to get something from the freezer..
    > back in a jiffy..


    Damn you!

    <AOL>Me too!!11!!</AOL>

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    "Eddies in the space time continuum"
    "Oh. Is he?" -- Zem?
     
  11. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "TimC" <[email protected]
    > On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 at 04:30 GMT, hippy (aka Bruce)
    > > "TimC" <[email protected]
    > >> [1] I used to very carefully have to plan my shopping, and if I needed
    > >> kitty litter or icecream (and the latter is always very urgent, and
    > >> needs to be frequently bought), then I couldn't get anything else

    > >
    > > Which reminds me.. I need to get something from the freezer..
    > > back in a jiffy..

    >
    > Damn you!
    >
    > <AOL>Me too!!11!!</AOL>


    My dehydration headache is just starting to go away.. :-S

    hippy
    - needs more ice-related products
     
  12. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 at 07:24 GMT, hippy (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > hippy
    > - needs more ice-related products


    I endorse this product and/or service.

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    I repeat myself when under stress. I repeat myself when under
    stress. I repeat myself when under stress. I repeat myself when
    under stress. I repeat myself when under stress. I repeat myself
    when under stress. I repeat myself when under stress. I repeat
     
  13. [email protected] wrote:

    > A good friend of mine has moved recently and is now 12km's from his
    > place of work. He lives in Upwey and works in Scoresby; apparently
    > there's a pretty good cycle path he can use.
    >
    > He's pretty much a couch potato and keen to do something about it.
    > Naturally I want to do as much as I can to make the transition to car
    > bound couch potato to freedom machine enjoying cyclist as painless as
    > possible. What follows is a working draft on what I think he should
    > sort out. If I've left anything glaring out, please comment :)



    SNIP

    I got a friend into commuting too - good luck!

    A couple of other ideas:
    - Spray-proof jacket
    - Mudguards (if he can live with the dagginess)

    How are his skills for riding in traffic? Even simple skills like
    indicating & looking behind without swerving might need a bit of
    practice. This may be overkill for his commute and stage of
    "transition", but the best website I've found on this is
    http://www.bikexprt.com/streetsmarts/usa/ Just needs a bit of
    "conversion" from USA to Oz.
     
  14. just us

    just us Guest

    I would consider myself a fairly new commuter. My first bike in over 30
    years was a mountain bike, it was a bitch to ride to work. Looking back now
    I realise that the guy in the bike shop did me a great diservice, it cost me
    over $700 and was a great bike off road, but I am in my 40s and just wanted
    to get back on a bike! So after struggling up and down the hills to work, I
    slowly but surely gave the bike riding up. Earlier this year we got out our
    old tandem, did up the gears, bought new seats, got bike pants, and away we
    went for a 200kms weekend!!!! I came home stuffed, and by the following
    weekend we were off again - now it is effortless on the tandem, and a 250kms
    weekend with full panniers for a nights camp is achievable now. We went on a
    850kms ride over 6 days and to me it was a declaration of "I can do
    anything!" I came home, sold the mountain bike, and bought a hybrid. It has
    mudguards (better than dirty back and legs) hubby gave me a computer, I said
    "what a waste of money!" . Now it is my prized possession, and I have just
    clocked up my first 1000kms on the new bike, fastest speed is 51kph downhill
    with magpie in hot pursuit! LOL. And bike pants make life bearable, I would
    suggest any newbie get bike pants early in the piece.I now go the long way
    home from work, and clock up at least 25kms each day. I have LED lights, a
    comfy helmet, and just love my bike. I think the biggest thing about getting
    started is a feeling of complete elation on the day you realise "I can do
    that" and the best way to do that is by buying a bike that suits what you
    want out of it. BTW this bike only cost me $450. Of all the things that I
    bought and treasure most, the bike pants are way up there at number 1,
    followed by the computer, and my seat!
    Goodluck to the newbie, my bike gear is waiting for me in the morning, I
    wouldnt be without my bike now..
    kathy.
     
  15. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    Everyone has covered the equipment perrt much.
    Upwey to Scoresby = quick trip to work, slower return home. A good commute if he can manage the climb home each day. He could also catch the train at Upper FTG if he can't face the climb?

    -B "past hill's dweller"
     
  16. Marx SS

    Marx SS New Member

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    Commuting is funny for me really.
    Back when I first got into it in 1989, going from St Albans to West Melbourne 9to5, bike lanes/paths were few & far between. I got a MTB & loaded it with all the commuter accessories, lights, bells, computer,'guards, racks, slickest tyres available etc etc. Did that for ages happy as larry.
    Nowadays with the onset of linked-up bike paths, bike lanes & ramps everywhere (instead of stairs) , my regular commute has shed much of the stuff I orgianlly set up on it, with only really a rear tailight & nothing else (even dropped all the gears/derailuers - single gear). Sure my route has changed now (Flemington > City), but if I take the scenic route (city bike trail) I hardly run into traffic which really frees up my approah to riding now - almost good enough to be illegal.
     
  17. >>>>> "euan" == euan b uk <[email protected]> writes:

    euan> A good friend of mine has moved recently and is now 12km's
    euan> from his place of work. He lives in Upwey and works in
    euan> Scoresby; apparently there's a pretty good cycle path he can
    euan> use.

    Thanks all for your input. I've pointed my mate to this thread, reckon
    that'd be more enlightening for him than me trying to summarize it all.
    --
    Cheers
    Euan
     
  18. aeek

    aeek New Member

    Joined:
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  19. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "just us" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I would consider myself a fairly new commuter. My first bike in over
    > 30 years was a mountain bike, it was a bitch to ride to work. Looking
    > back now I realise that the guy in the bike shop did me a great
    > diservice, it cost me over $700 and was a great bike off road, but I
    > am in my 40s and just wanted to get back on a bike! So after
    > struggling up and down the hills to work, I slowly but surely gave
    > the bike riding up.


    Why didn't you just put slicks on it?

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  20. ritcho

    ritcho New Member

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    [cheeky]If he's strugging _down_ hills as well as up, then I suggest he adjusts the brakes[/cheeky]

    Slicks are a pretty good option, especially if he can fit (say) 28mm slicks on the MTB rims... is that size too narrow for such a thing?

    The OP might also wish to try getting a more aero seating position - handlebars down a little, seat up higher... replace flat bars with drops?... add aero bars? Clipless pedals? I guess the costs add up - slicks are pretty cost-effective...

    Ritch
     
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