Heart Rate advice required Please



flanagaj

New Member
Mar 23, 2004
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I ride with a few Triathletes on a Sunday morning and thought it would be good to compare heart rates. I was really surprised to find that theirs seemed low compared to mine (they only told me they never go more than 170). I sit on my turbo quite happily training in the region of 170 - 180 for 30 minutes no problem. I know my max is high as I did a max HR test a couple of years ago and it was 205 I am 32.

Am I worrying over nothing ?

Thanks

Juckky
 
S

Simon Daw

Guest
"flanagaj" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> Am I worrying over nothing ?
>
Almost certainly - HRs vary tremendously between
individuals. It's not like comparing RPM in a car engine!

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B

Brakepiston

Guest
You can find out your training zones by percentage of you max heart
rate:

40-55% - UT2 Long ( 2-4hours) Steady 55-70% - UT1 Mid-length
(45min-1 1/2 h) Steady 70-80% - AT - Steady short pieces
80%+ OT/OTT Bursts

This is a rough guide. I can't remember the
percentages exactly.

This is the best way to compare heart rates. Everyone
working at UT2, see what the difference in fitness is.

On Tue, 23 Mar 2004 20:31:36 GMT, flanagaj <usenet-
[email protected]> wrote:

>I ride with a few Triathletes on a Sunday morning and
>thought it would be good to compare heart rates. I was
>really surprised to find that theirs seemed low compared to
>mine (they only told me they never go more than 170). I sit
>on my turbo quite happily training in the region of 170
>- 180 for 30 minutes no problem. I know my max is high as
> I did a max HR test a couple of years ago and it was 205
> I am 32.
>
>Am I worrying over nothing ?
>
>Thanks
>
>Juckky
 
M

Msa

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
> >I ride with a few Triathletes on a Sunday morning and
> >thought it would be good to compare heart rates. I was
> >really surprised to find that theirs seemed low
> >compared to mine (they only told me they never go more
> >than 170). I sit on my turbo quite happily training in
> >the region of 170
> >- 180 for 30 minutes no problem. I know my max is high as
> > I did a max HR test a couple of years ago and it was
> > 205 I am 32.
> >
> >Am I worrying over nothing ?
>

Yes, heart rates vary tremendously. I have no problem
staying around 170 for an hour or so during time trials (my
max is 186), I have friends who never exceed 150 and some
that go 185 and above for extended periods.

Don't worry about it, but you might want to tell the
triathletes that they really should try harder :)

--
Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not
volume. Some settling of contents may have occurred during
transmission
 
S

Simon Daw

Guest
"W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Simon Daw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> > "flanagaj" <[email protected]> wrote in
> > message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >
> > > Am I worrying over nothing ?
> > >
> > Almost certainly - HRs vary tremendously between
> > individuals. It's not
> like
> > comparing RPM in a car engine!
>
> eh?
>
> They might have big old V8s and he's got a wankel ...

Yeah, it's not good to have a wankel...;-)

Point is, he's able to ride at 170-180 for 1/2 hour, so his
AT must be above that - it's hard to interpret "no
problem", but if this means "without falling in crumpled
heap afterwards then, given a possible max of 205, his AT
may be 185 or even slightly over. That's above average for
a 32 year old (my AT at his age was about 175, for
instance) - and it means that someone else who's at the
same level of fitness may be at a similar comfort level,
and producing the same output, but with a HR 15 or 20 beats
lower. Although HR is obviously dramatically affected by
fitness level, it is not a simple indicator of fitness - as
I wrote, it's personal.

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A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"flanagaj" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I ride with a few Triathletes on a Sunday morning and
> thought it would be good to compare heart rates. I was
> really surprised to find that theirs seemed low
> compared to mine (they only told me they never go more
> than 170). I sit on my turbo quite happily training in
> the region of 170
> - 180 for 30 minutes no problem. I know my max is high as
> I did a max HR test a couple of years ago and it was 205
> I am 32.
>
> Am I worrying over nothing ?

Yes.

Forget all about measuring the rate and enjoy cycling.

Alan
--
Reply to alan(at)windsor-berks(dot)freeserve(dot)co(dot)uk
 
M

Mark South

Guest
"Alan Holmes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

Think my news server is dropping posts as I never saw
the original.

> "flanagaj" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I ride with a few Triathletes on a Sunday morning and
> > thought it would be good to compare heart rates. I was
> > really surprised to find that theirs seemed low compared
> > to mine (they only told me they never go more than 170).
> > I sit on my turbo quite happily training in the region
> > of 170
> > - 180 for 30 minutes no problem. I know my max is high
> > as I did a max HR test a couple of years ago and it
> > was 205 I am 32.
> >
> > Am I worrying over nothing ?

Well, variation of a few beats/min is normal across the
population. If you were with a very fit bunch of triathletes
they probably wouldn't go very high though.

Triathletes (well-trained ones) generally find it hard to
get their HR up high on the bike.

> Yes.

Agreed.

> Forget all about measuring the rate and enjoy cycling.

Disagreed. For you that might work Alan (I hope it does and
I'm happy if you are happy). For "flanagaj" I would suggest
reading a book on using HR measurements.

Also, try riding a known course repeatedly over a period of
time, and try to keep your HR constant (at whatever you can
sustain). This gives you an early indicator of how your body
is responding to training.

Do some bricking regularly too, and measure your HR change
across the brick.

Good luck
--
Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen, Useless Runner
 
S

Simon D

Guest
"Mark South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> Think my news server is dropping posts as I never saw the
> original.
>

No, it's not. The OP is weeks (and weeks) old; a number of
respondents made similar points to those you've made, I seem
to remember.
 
M

Mark South

Guest
"Simon D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Mark South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
> > Think my news server is dropping posts as I never saw
> > the original.
> >
> No, it's not. The OP is weeks (and weeks) old; a number of
> respondents made similar points to those you've made, I
> seem to remember.

That'll teach me to Google for every post to see if it's
already been responded to several years before.

Wait a moment, how old is your post?
--
Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen, Present Dweller