If you could have 1 new bike component this year, what would it be

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Spm073, Mar 21, 2003.

  1. Spm073

    Spm073 Guest

    Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last year would not be an every year
    investment, im thinking about buying some new components to my bike. Id love some advice on
    what/when/how to buy and what potential gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill
    Trek 1000 with pedal clips. Im a newbie sprint triathlete but do a few century bike races too I
    weighing a few options:

    Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her support/patience.

    So, any thoughts?

    Patrick
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    Aerobars will make you faster, the fastest single thing you can put on a bike. But there aren't many
    people left racing without clipless pedals, so you should probably upgrade these. Not only do they
    improve power, but properly fitted are more comfortable and convenient.

    You can get both of these items for around $100 used. I'll send you a pair of Syntace C2 clip on
    aerobars in good shape for $50 plus shipping. I'll bet you can get the pedals on eBay or elsewhere
    for a similar price. You didn't mention your shoe situation to go with the pedals.

    Frame and component weight doesn't mean that much in triathlon, unless you are already very light
    (male under 150 pounds) and riding hilly courses. Even then, aerodynamics far "outweigh" gravity
    considerations. Given a choice between frame/components and aero wheels, go with the wheels--but
    these are some of the most expensive upgrades you can buy.

    With aerobars and pedals, you can still take that vacation.

    "Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last year
    would
    > not be an every year investment, im thinking about buying some new
    components
    > to my bike. Id love some advice on what/when/how to buy and what
    potential
    > gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill Trek 1000 with pedal clips. Im a newbie
    > sprint triathlete but do a few century bike
    races too
    > I weighing a few options:
    >
    > Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    > include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her
    > support/patience.
    >
    > So, any thoughts?
    >
    > Patrick
     
  3. Tribro3

    Tribro3 Guest

    I agree with some of the other posters here, you'll want to upgrade to clipless pedals. They will
    help increase your power through the stroke, less foot movement. Aerobars will as well help increase
    speed. You should get some practice time on them before racing to get properly fit and to used to
    the position. You'll find you'll work other parts of the leg while in the aero position.

    My advice would be to get those 2 mentioned, then maybe if you have the cash upgrade the frame and
    put your old components on it. You might be able to spread out your costs by purchasing piece meal.

    p.s. pick a race to do out of town that can double as a vacation for the wife. Florida, Hawaii,
    California. There are a lot of races out there. Let her choose a destination then find a race
    to do while there.

    -tribro http://www.trifuel.com/
     
  4. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:52:43 GMT, "Tom Rodgers" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Aerobars will make you faster, the fastest single thing you can put on a bike. But there aren't
    >many people left racing without clipless pedals, so you should probably upgrade these. Not only do
    >they improve power, but properly fitted are more comfortable and convenient.
    >
    >You can get both of these items for around $100 used. I'll send you a pair of Syntace C2 clip on
    >aerobars in good shape for $50 plus shipping. I'll bet you can get the pedals on eBay or elsewhere
    >for a similar price. You didn't mention your shoe situation to go with the pedals.
    >
    >Frame and component weight doesn't mean that much in triathlon, unless you are already very light
    >(male under 150 pounds) and riding hilly courses. Even then, aerodynamics far "outweigh" gravity
    >considerations. Given a choice between frame/components and aero wheels, go with the wheels--but
    >these are some of the most expensive upgrades you can buy.
    >
    >With aerobars and pedals, you can still take that vacation.

    I'm sure this has been gone over ad infinitum in this forum, but what recommendations would
    you make for clip on aero bars. Price is obviously a concern. Any considerations for size of
    the rider? Are most systems adjustable enough to accomidate riders of varying range. BTW I'm
    on the smaller end of the spectrum.

    ~Matt

    >
    >
    >"Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last year
    >would
    >> not be an every year investment, im thinking about buying some new
    >components
    >> to my bike. Id love some advice on what/when/how to buy and what
    >potential
    >> gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill Trek 1000 with pedal clips. Im a
    >> newbie sprint triathlete but do a few century bike
    >races too
    >> I weighing a few options:
    >>
    >> Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    >> include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her
    >> support/patience.
    >>
    >> So, any thoughts?
    >>
    >> Patrick
     
  5. Felix

    Felix Guest

    As Tom wrote you can get an aerobar and clip pedals for not so much money. And this are good
    investments. I would first go for the aero bars.

    I bought a Cervelo One Triathlon bike at the end of last season. I also thought that I won't buy any
    bikr components this year. But now I am considering race wheels (HED H3 front and Renn Disc rear).
    To get the money (for one wheel) I try to sell my old road bike with aero bars. Then there is also
    my 30th birthday in July...

    Felix http://home.tiscalinet.ch/weilenmann/Sport

    Tom Rodgers wrote:

    > Aerobars will make you faster, the fastest single thing you can put on a bike. But there aren't
    > many people left racing without clipless pedals, so you should probably upgrade these. Not only do
    > they improve power, but properly fitted are more comfortable and convenient.
    >
    > You can get both of these items for around $100 used. I'll send you a pair of Syntace C2 clip on
    > aerobars in good shape for $50 plus shipping. I'll bet you can get the pedals on eBay or elsewhere
    > for a similar price. You didn't mention your shoe situation to go with the pedals.
    >
    > Frame and component weight doesn't mean that much in triathlon, unless you are already very light
    > (male under 150 pounds) and riding hilly courses. Even then, aerodynamics far "outweigh" gravity
    > considerations. Given a choice between frame/components and aero wheels, go with the wheels--but
    > these are some of the most expensive upgrades you can buy.
    >
    > With aerobars and pedals, you can still take that vacation.
    >
    > "Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last year would not be an every
    >>year investment, im thinking about buying some new components to my bike. Id love some advice on
    >>what/when/how to buy and what potential gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill
    >>Trek 1000 with pedal clips. Im a newbie sprint triathlete but do a few century bike races too
    >
    >> I weighing a few options:
    >>
    >>Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    >>include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her
    >>support/patience.
    >>
    >>So, any thoughts?
    >>
    >>Patrick
     
  6. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    There are lots of aerobars out there, and lots of different body types. It's as much personal
    preference as science, and in fact the bar that is most comfortable for you is probably the best.
    I've had very good experience with the Syntace C2, which is comfortable and adjustable. These are
    ideal to put on existing handlebars (conventional road bars or bullhorn time-trial bars). Again, if
    you're interested, I have a used pair available for $50 ($120 new). I still use Syntace on training
    bikes, and road thousands of miles. Profile also makes pretty good bars in different sizes.

    If you already have aerobar experience, and want the about the best speed, go with an integrated
    aerobar/handlebar/stem like the Profile CarbonX (I use these) or VisionTech. These are a bit lighter
    and even more aerodynamic, since all elements are connected. They are adjustable, but a bit less so
    since they are pre-connected. They are usually very expensive, but used prices on the internet are
    available.

    The Syntace come in different sizes. Unless you have very long arms, the medium is usually suitable.
    The Profiles usually come in one size, but with very long bars than be let in/out for different arm
    lengths. In fact, you can saw off and inch or so of the carbon edge if you don't need the whole
    length (most don't). That's a John Cobb trick he uses with Lance and with triathletes.

    Some people are going with the "slam bars" which are more for draft-legal racing, but some find them
    comfortable enough for age-group triathlon as well.

    The bottom line is that if you are flexible and athletic, you can probably race with anything so go
    with what's fastest. Otherwise, go with what's comfortable. Note that height and positioning vary
    with types of riding (short course, Ironman, ultradistance, etc.), and even vary during the year as
    your flexibility improves. See John Cobb's www.bicyclesports.com for best info on aero positioning.

    If you are ever in Texas, I do this style of fitting along with power-output testing. Feel
    free to email.

    <MJuric> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:52:43 GMT, "Tom Rodgers" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Aerobars will make you faster, the fastest single thing you can put on a bike. But there aren't
    > >many people left racing without clipless pedals,
    so
    > >you should probably upgrade these. Not only do they improve power, but properly fitted are more
    > >comfortable and convenient.
    > >
    > >You can get both of these items for around $100 used. I'll send you a
    pair
    > >of Syntace C2 clip on aerobars in good shape for $50 plus shipping. I'll
    bet
    > >you can get the pedals on eBay or elsewhere for a similar price. You
    didn't
    > >mention your shoe situation to go with the pedals.
    > >
    > >Frame and component weight doesn't mean that much in triathlon, unless
    you
    > >are already very light (male under 150 pounds) and riding hilly courses. Even then, aerodynamics
    > >far "outweigh" gravity considerations. Given a choice between frame/components and aero wheels,
    > >go with the wheels--but these are some of the most expensive upgrades you can buy.
    > >
    > >With aerobars and pedals, you can still take that vacation.
    >
    > I'm sure this has been gone over ad infinitum in this forum, but what recommendations would you
    > make for clip on aero bars. Price is obviously a concern. Any considerations for size of the
    > rider? Are most systems adjustable enough to accomidate riders of varying range. BTW I'm on the
    > smaller end of the spectrum.
    >
    > ~Matt
    >
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >"Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last
    year
    > >would
    > >> not be an every year investment, im thinking about buying some new
    > >components
    > >> to my bike. Id love some advice on what/when/how to buy and what
    > >potential
    > >> gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill Trek 1000
    with
    > >> pedal clips. Im a newbie sprint triathlete but do a few century bike
    > >races too
    > >> I weighing a few options:
    > >>
    > >> Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    > >> include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her
    support/patience.
    > >>
    > >> So, any thoughts?
    > >>
    > >> Patrick
    > >
     
  7. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 13:30:40 GMT, "Tom Rodgers" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There are lots of aerobars out there, and lots of different body types. It's as much personal
    >preference as science, and in fact the bar that is most comfortable for you is probably the best.
    >I've had very good experience with the Syntace C2, which is comfortable and adjustable. These are
    >ideal to put on existing handlebars (conventional road bars or bullhorn time-trial bars). Again, if
    >you're interested, I have a used pair available for $50 ($120 new). I still use Syntace on training
    >bikes, and road thousands of miles. Profile also makes pretty good bars in different sizes.
    >
    >If you already have aerobar experience, and want the about the best speed, go with an integrated
    >aerobar/handlebar/stem like the Profile CarbonX (I use these) or VisionTech. These are a bit
    >lighter and even more aerodynamic, since all elements are connected. They are adjustable, but a bit
    >less so since they are pre-connected. They are usually very expensive, but used prices on the
    >internet are available.
    >
    >The Syntace come in different sizes. Unless you have very long arms, the medium is usually
    >suitable. The Profiles usually come in one size, but with very long bars than be let in/out for
    >different arm lengths. In fact, you can saw off and inch or so of the carbon edge if you don't need
    >the whole length (most don't). That's a John Cobb trick he uses with Lance and with triathletes.
    >
    >Some people are going with the "slam bars" which are more for draft-legal racing, but some find
    >them comfortable enough for age-group triathlon as well.
    >
    >The bottom line is that if you are flexible and athletic, you can probably race with anything so go
    >with what's fastest. Otherwise, go with what's comfortable. Note that height and positioning vary
    >with types of riding (short course, Ironman, ultradistance, etc.), and even vary during the year as
    >your flexibility improves. See John Cobb's www.bicyclesports.com for best info on aero positioning.
    >
    >If you are ever in Texas, I do this style of fitting along with power-output testing. Feel free
    >to email.

    So pretty much off to the bike shop and see what "feels" best. I've been thinking thats
    probably the best way to go. I took me quite awhile to get my bike somewhat dialed in
    without aero bars. I'm sure that areo's will make some differences in riding position, bike
    adjustment, anything in particular one should look for? I've historically suffered from ITB
    in one leg. It took quite awhile to get my bike adjusted so as to not "inflame" it should
    does Aero's have much of an effect on this VS riding in the drops?

    ~Matt
    >
    >
    >
    ><MJuric> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:52:43 GMT, "Tom Rodgers" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Aerobars will make you faster, the fastest single thing you can put on a bike. But there aren't
    >> >many people left racing without clipless pedals,
    >so
    >> >you should probably upgrade these. Not only do they improve power, but properly fitted are more
    >> >comfortable and convenient.
    >> >
    >> >You can get both of these items for around $100 used. I'll send you a
    >pair
    >> >of Syntace C2 clip on aerobars in good shape for $50 plus shipping. I'll
    >bet
    >> >you can get the pedals on eBay or elsewhere for a similar price. You
    >didn't
    >> >mention your shoe situation to go with the pedals.
    >> >
    >> >Frame and component weight doesn't mean that much in triathlon, unless
    >you
    >> >are already very light (male under 150 pounds) and riding hilly courses. Even then, aerodynamics
    >> >far "outweigh" gravity considerations. Given a choice between frame/components and aero wheels,
    >> >go with the wheels--but these are some of the most expensive upgrades you can buy.
    >> >
    >> >With aerobars and pedals, you can still take that vacation.
    >>
    >> I'm sure this has been gone over ad infinitum in this forum, but what recommendations would you
    >> make for clip on aero bars. Price is obviously a concern. Any considerations for size of the
    >> rider? Are most systems adjustable enough to accomidate riders of varying range. BTW I'm on the
    >> smaller end of the spectrum.
    >>
    >> ~Matt
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> >> Despite my promise to myself and my wife that my bike purchase last
    >year
    >> >would
    >> >> not be an every year investment, im thinking about buying some new
    >> >components
    >> >> to my bike. Id love some advice on what/when/how to buy and what
    >> >potential
    >> >> gains it would make. Im currently riding a run of the mill Trek 1000
    >with
    >> >> pedal clips. Im a newbie sprint triathlete but do a few century bike
    >> >races too
    >> >> I weighing a few options:
    >> >>
    >> >> Aerobars Clipless pedals/shoes lighter components new bike (if i had the money i'd do this and
    >> >> include all of the above) taking my wife on a nice vacation to reward her for her
    >support/patience.
    >> >>
    >> >> So, any thoughts?
    >> >>
    >> >> Patrick
    >> >
    >> >
    >
     
  8. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    The basics for Clydesdales are the same, but if you have long arms go with the larger Syntace. The
    standard integrated sets like Profile CarbonX already have long bars, so can be adjusted.

    Clydesdales benefit even more than others from correct aero positioning since the larger body
    creates more drag, and their usually stronger, larger upper bodies benefit more from race. A
    Clydesdale in the right aero position with strong legs can be a devestating force on flat, windy
    courses. You can reel in smaller, more talented athletes with your strength. I'm not quite a
    Clydesdale at 185 pounds, but I'm quite strong and stocky at 5'11", and I've trained and raced with
    6'5" guys who are devestating riders at 205 pounds.

    "Spm073" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'll second MAtt's question for those of us that happen to be on the
    opposite
    > end of the size spectrum (Clydesdales)
     
  9. New cabling...rust is corroding my rear brake cable and the housing. This causes the rear brake
    to seize up.

    Harry
     
  10. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    "Tom Rodgers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > There are lots of aerobars out there, and lots of different body types. It's as much personal
    > preference as science, and in fact the bar that is most comfortable for you is probably the
    > best. I've had very good experience with the Syntace C2, which is comfortable and adjustable.
    > These are ideal to put on existing handlebars (conventional road bars or bullhorn time-trial
    > bars). Again, if you're interested, I have a used pair available for $50 ($120 new). I still use
    > Syntace on training bikes, and road thousands of miles. Profile also makes pretty good bars in
    > different sizes.
    >
    > If you already have aerobar experience, and want the about the best speed, go with an integrated
    > aerobar/handlebar/stem like the Profile CarbonX (I use these) or VisionTech. These are a bit
    > lighter and even more aerodynamic, since all elements are connected. They are adjustable, but a
    > bit less so since they are pre-connected. They are usually very expensive, but used prices on the
    > internet are available.
    >
    > The Syntace come in different sizes. Unless you have very long arms, the medium is usually
    > suitable. The Profiles usually come in one size, but with very long bars than be let in/out for
    > different arm lengths. In fact, you can saw off and inch or so of the carbon edge if you don't
    > need the whole length (most don't). That's a John Cobb trick he uses with Lance and with
    > triathletes.

    Several questions.

    Are true aero bars better than the clip-ons? I mean, vs clip ons that go with regular road bars, not
    the tri bars.

    Does it matter that I'm on a road bike, with the standard road angles, or will the bars not help
    that much in this case?

    If you could recommend one for a larger guy somewhat unused to an aerobar set-up, what would it be?
    Keep in mind that I can get any of the Profile Design bars for about half of retail, so I'm probably
    going to be partial to theirs. It sounds like the Carbon-x is one of your favorites?
     
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