Info Request: Webbed Belt

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bebopper, May 29, 2004.

  1. Bebopper

    Bebopper Guest

    Howdy all, have just gotten back into this biking thing and it is kinda
    fun. OK my problem: I need to carry stuff like my wallet and keys and
    small junk like that, but don't want to have to get a bag. Looked at some
    of the small ones that fit behind the saddle, but my rear light is in the
    way. Also thought about getting some of them fancy bike jerseys with back
    pockets but THEY COST ALOT!! Anyway am comfy with my cheapo T-shirts so
    don't wanna change.

    So I thought about getting a fannypack, but all of them are way too big and
    get in the way when you're in an aero tuck. So what I'm thinking of is a
    wide web belt with removable attachments like a wallet pouch that I can
    slip on and off. Then I can also attach a night blinky or a cell phone
    using a normal belt clip. Do any of you use anything like this, and can
    give me a heads-up on where to look? Thanks muchly in advance.
     
    Tags:


  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Bebopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Howdy all, have just gotten back into this biking thing and it is kinda
    > fun. OK my problem: I need to carry stuff like my wallet and keys and
    > small junk like that, but don't want to have to get a bag. Looked at some
    > of the small ones that fit behind the saddle, but my rear light is in the
    > way.


    Cannondale makes seat bags with loops for rear lights.
     
  3. >So what I'm thinking of is a wide web belt with removable attachments
    >like a wallet pouch that I can slip on and off. Then I can also attach
    >a night blinky or a cell phone using a normal belt clip.


    I haven't tried that. I use a light, cheap (under $20 US) back pack,
    sometimes called a book bag. The small compartment holds keys,
    checkbook, ID, etc. This is the part that goes with me. I'll
    typically stuff a windshell and patch kit into it.

    The part that stays on the bike is the panniers, that gives me an
    expanded carrying capacity and the ability to haul groceries.

    The phone is in a zip lock bag within the book bag, it's impervious
    to rain.

    Lights go with me in the book bag and can quickly be mounted when
    necessary on the more or less permanent attachment points on the
    bike.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
    ------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  4. neil0502

    neil0502 Guest

    "Bebopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Howdy all, have just gotten back into this biking thing

    and it is kinda
    > fun. OK my problem: I need to carry stuff like my wallet

    and keys and
    > small junk like that, but don't want to have to get a bag.

    Looked at some
    > of the small ones that fit behind the saddle, but my rear

    light is in the
    > way. Also thought about getting some of them fancy bike

    jerseys with back
    > pockets but THEY COST ALOT!! Anyway am comfy with my

    cheapo T-shirts so
    > don't wanna change.
    >
    > So I thought about getting a fannypack, but all of them

    are way too big and
    > get in the way when you're in an aero tuck. So what I'm

    thinking of is a
    > wide web belt with removable attachments like a wallet

    pouch that I can
    > slip on and off. Then I can also attach a night blinky or

    a cell phone
    > using a normal belt clip. Do any of you use anything like

    this, and can
    > give me a heads-up on where to look? Thanks muchly in

    advance.

    Lots of people use the backpack-style hydration packs that
    offer a bit of additional storage. If you get a low-volume
    bladder (~50oz.)--then when the straps are cinched down--the
    pack shouldn't interfere much with an aero tuck.

    A case could probably be made (but not by me!) that this
    actually does less to disturb your aerodynamics than a
    couple of bottles and cages.....
     
  5. Bebopper wrote:

    > ... So what I'm thinking of is a
    > wide web belt with removable attachments like a wallet pouch that I can
    > slip on and off. Then I can also attach a night blinky or a cell phone
    > using a normal belt clip. Do any of you use anything like this, and can
    > give me a heads-up on where to look? Thanks muchly in advance.


    I don't use anything like that. Back when I started biking, I tried
    various ways of carrying stuff, and decided that bags on the bike were
    absolutely the best. At least, for me.

    But I wanted to comment about your blinky idea. Attaching a blinky to
    your clothing, or your web belt, is probably a bad idea. LED blinkies
    are great inventions, but their light is very, very directional. They
    must be accurately aimed to do any practical good.

    I've ridden behind people with blinkies clipped on clothes, backpacks,
    hydration packs, etc. who were unaware that their floppy mounting
    surface had their blinkies pointing at earthworms or airplanes. Mount
    it on your bike, with its beam horizontal.

    Or, as another poster said, you can clip it on a seat bag with a loop
    designed for that purpose.




    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  6. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >Bebopper [email protected]

    wrote in part:

    >So I thought about getting a fannypack, but all of them are way too big and
    >get in the way when you're in an aero tuck.


    I use a fannypack sometimes, usually if I'm doing an all day (6+ hrs) ride. I
    looked and couldn't find any that really suited my needs so I made my own. I
    used "ballistic" nylon (a very stout weave), plastic cut from a gallon milk jug
    for reinforcement, some thin foam padding where the bag rides against my back,
    a light ripstop nylon for lining, some webbing, and a nylok buckle from REI.
    The bag itself is a fairly flat U-shape with 2.0" wide tubular webbing. The
    sewing only took about 1.5 hrs including the heavy duty zipper. You could cut
    that time in half easily if you happen to know how to use a sewing machine.
    That may seem like a lot of work for something you can buy very cheaply (if you
    find one that you like) but it suits my rather special needs perfectly.

    Regards,
    Bob Hunt
     
  7. Beboper

    Beboper Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>So what I'm thinking of is a wide web belt with removable attachments
    >>like a wallet pouch that I can slip on and off. Then I can also attach
    >>a night blinky or a cell phone using a normal belt clip.

    >
    >I haven't tried that. I use a light, cheap (under $20 US) back pack,
    >sometimes called a book bag. The small compartment holds keys,
    >checkbook, ID, etc. This is the part that goes with me. I'll
    >typically stuff a windshell and patch kit into it.
    >
    >The part that stays on the bike is the panniers, that gives me an
    >expanded carrying capacity and the ability to haul groceries.
    >
    >The phone is in a zip lock bag within the book bag, it's impervious
    >to rain.
    >
    >Lights go with me in the book bag and can quickly be mounted when
    >necessary on the more or less permanent attachment points on the
    >bike.


    Thanks to everyone for the replies. As with Bob Hunt, I was about to go
    the DYI route, getting some thick wide webbing and putting a buckle on it.
    But my sewing skill isn't sufficiently advanced to make loops for a belt
    pouch (OK actually I'm just lazy), so I was looking at some of them PDA
    cases with belt clips, which are big enough for a wallet. To make a long
    story short, I was in a recycling mood this morn and went to a thrift
    store. It has some smallish fanny packs for a buck apiece, so I bought one
    and it's working out. It's not totally ideal, but may be I just need to
    get used to it. Yes, it's my laziness talking.

    Thanks for the note about the directional nature of the LED blinky. Right
    now I have it mounted on the seat post, and I'll leave it there.

    Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),
    or is it enough to have a rear light? If I need to I'll get a LED one for
    long battery life. That and it uses AA so it's lighter. I think the prob
    with LED front light is that they don't put out much of a beam, but my
    situation is more of a "to be seen" rather than "to see," so if I put it on
    flash mode it should be OK.

    I'm getting used to the clipless stuff I've just got. It's a SPD road type
    (one side only), so I'm still having some probs getting my 2nd foot to clip
    in. Yeah shoulda get a 2-sided setup oh well. Having to look down more
    than once to flip it and get it clipped isn't too great. With my old toe
    clips I can just flip it by feel. Just need more practice I guess.

    Thanks again for all ya input and just want to say that ya are a great
    bunch of folks. Have enjoyed reading through the messages.
     
  8. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Beboper wrote:

    >
    >Thanks to everyone for the replies. As with Bob Hunt, I was about to go
    >the DYI route, getting some thick wide webbing and putting a buckle on it.
    >But my sewing skill isn't sufficiently advanced to make loops for a belt
    >pouch (OK actually I'm just lazy), so I was looking at some of them PDA
    >cases with belt clips, which are big enough for a wallet. To make a long
    >story short, I was in a recycling mood this morn and went to a thrift
    >store. It has some smallish fanny packs for a buck apiece, so I bought one
    >and it's working out. It's not totally ideal, but may be I just need to
    >get used to it. Yes, it's my laziness talking.
    >

    When I travel light, I use a fanny pack. Don't wear it tho. I just
    buckle it around my rack. Tuck the loose ends up to keep them out of
    the spokes and go. It's very aero, has never come off by itself, and
    when I get off the bike, I wear it as a fanny pack.
    IMO, virtually any bike benefits from a rear rack - or the rider does,
    at least!
    It's just a good practical hikers' fanny pack. Available in better
    outdoor stores. Mine was from MEC in Canada, but not trying to plug any
    brands.
    Bernie
     
  9. >Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),
    >or is it enough to have a rear light?


    If anything, the front light is the more important, as long as you also
    have a rear reflector. Check you local ordinances for what's actually
    required as opposed to what is recommended.

    Most jurisdictions specify minimum visibility distances.

    There have been discussions here about what the appropriate type
    of lighting may be, but no one has ever successfully argued that active
    lighting, front and rear, is a bad idea.

    What you use is going to depend on your conditions and your budget.

    If you spend a lot of time riding after dark then a generator may be
    the way to go, the "big" rechargeables usually give up in run time
    what they gain in illumination, although they are great for sub-hour
    winter commutes.

    LEDs will likely meet the legal visibility requirements and won't be
    too expensive in terms of initial cost, you might still consider
    rechargeable batteries with these.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
    ------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  10. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Mon, 31 May 2004 02:03:43 GMT, Beboper <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >
    >Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),
    >or is it enough to have a rear light?


    Front light is legally required in California.

    Whether required or not, get one!!!! I have a Trek white LED lamp- one
    LED, no good for seeing in the dark but fine for being seen. Steady or
    flashing mode, AAA batteries, last forever. And as small as rear
    lights. I consider the minimum for night riding. Just notice how hard
    it is to see other bicyclists when they don't have a front light if yo
    have any doubts about their use.

    > If I need to I'll get a LED one for
    >long battery life. That and it uses AA so it's lighter. I think the prob
    >with LED front light is that they don't put out much of a beam, but my
    >situation is more of a "to be seen" rather than "to see," so if I put it on
    >flash mode it should be OK.
    >


    I'm in a city so I don't need to light up the road. LED lights work
    well in these situations.
     
  11. Beboper wrote:
    >
    > Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),
    > or is it enough to have a rear light? If I need to I'll get a LED one for
    > long battery life. That and it uses AA so it's lighter. I think the prob
    > with LED front light is that they don't put out much of a beam, but my
    > situation is more of a "to be seen" rather than "to see," so if I put it on
    > flash mode it should be OK.


    Every state in the Union requires a front light, not only "for legal
    purposes" but for practical purposes.

    Most collisions with cars come from the front (turning cars, cars
    pulling out in front of you, etc.) and most serious falls are caused by
    things in the road in front of you (gravel, potholes, bad RR tracks,
    etc.) You need light in front.

    LED headlights are (currently, in 2004) OK if you're riding at slow
    speeds on good, smooth roads in areas where there's good street
    lighting. They work as "be seen" lights. But I'm sure they'll get much
    better in years to come.

    If you find yourself riding in an area where the street lights have gone
    out, or you get partially blinded by a dimwit driver's high beams, or
    you get held over at work and it's dark out, you'll want a good headlight.

    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  12. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 31 May 2004 02:03:43 GMT, Beboper <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),


    I suppose local laws could differ, but in general, yes you do.

    >or is it enough to have a rear light? If I need to I'll get a LED one for
    >long battery life. That and it uses AA so it's lighter. I think the prob
    >with LED front light is that they don't put out much of a beam, but my
    >situation is more of a "to be seen" rather than "to see," so if I put it on
    >flash mode it should be OK.


    My Trek "Northern X2" has a 2.4 watt Halogen and an LED, each with
    two modes. The halogen has dim and bright modes, and the LED has
    solid and flashing. The LED is sufficient for conditions where a
    light isn't really needed to see where I'm going, and runs
    full-strength on nearly dead batteries. When I used it with those
    almost-dead batteries, I could see it's reflection on road signs
    very far away, so it throws quite a bit of light.

    >I'm getting used to the clipless stuff I've just got. It's a SPD road type
    >(one side only), so I'm still having some probs getting my 2nd foot to clip
    >in. Yeah shoulda get a 2-sided setup oh well. Having to look down more
    >than once to flip it and get it clipped isn't too great. With my old toe
    >clips I can just flip it by feel. Just need more practice I guess.


    After one season with one-sided pedals, I gave up and put some
    two-sided pedals on. Why bother with all that work, when two-sided
    pedals are so cheap anyway?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  13. whinds

    whinds Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Beboper
    <[email protected]> writes:



    >Question: For night riding, do I need a front light (for legal purposes),
    >or is it enough to have a rear light? If I need to I'll get a LED one for
    >long battery life. That and it uses AA so it's lighter. I think the prob
    >with LED front light is that they don't put out much of a beam, but my
    >situation is more of a "to be seen" rather than "to see," so if I put it on
    >flash mode it should be OK.
    >

    I'm a live testament for getting the brightest front light you can afford.
    I use to train a lot at dusk to night during the winter. I grew tired of
    swapping out a lot of carbon batteries so bought a 6 volt nicad system where
    the power cell fit in a water bottle holder. In high position the system was
    great for 3 hours or so and 6 hours at the half power setting. My nightly loop
    was about 1 hour of dusk and 5 hours of dark and half power seemed bright
    enough for the dark trail I rode. At half power I could see most objects in
    front in time to avoid or brake. What I didn't see was water across the roadway
    in December 18, 2002. There is where I did an endo in 2 ft of dirty, icecold
    water, my shoulder ground through two brand new winter jerseys against rough
    concrete, and finally the collar bone tore loose from the shoulder. I was lucky
    in that my bike still worked, allowing me to ride onehanded 10 miles back to a
    hospital. Eighteen months later and my shoulder still "reminds me" even on
    good days.
    I don't ride in the dark so much any more, but believe me when I do, my light
    is ALWAYS on its brightest!
    >
     
  14. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Frank Krygowski wrote:
    >
    > Bebopper wrote:
    > >
    > > ... So what I'm thinking of is a
    > > wide web belt with removable attachments like a wallet pouch that I can
    > > slip on and off. Then I can also attach a night blinky or a cell phone
    > > using a normal belt clip.

    >
    > I don't use anything like that. Back when I started biking, I tried
    > various ways of carrying stuff, and decided that bags on the bike were
    > absolutely the best. At least, for me.


    http://utilikilts.com/catalog-workman-index.htm
    http://www.stationhouse.com/uniforms/jaypee/sambrowne_belts.htm
    http://shop.store.yahoo.com/champions/zippocketcap.html
    http://www.shoes.com/product.asp?p=5007247~Mens~KANGA&sc=MENS&variant_id=37318#

    Chalo Colina
     
  15. "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > http://utilikilts.com/catalog-workman-index.htm

    >
    > you, uhh, been able to pull that off at work? (heh)


    Kinda off-topic, but, utilikilts are a sort of Seattle fad, aren't they? I
    would imagine in other cities, if a man wears what some people would call a
    skirt, someone's going to get beat up. Here, they seem to have some
    popularity among the working class and certain Gen X types. Do men wear them
    in other places?

    (just curious)


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  16. Claire Petersky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > http://utilikilts.com/catalog-workman-index.htm

    >>
    >> you, uhh, been able to pull that off at work? (heh)

    >
    > Kinda off-topic, but, utilikilts are a sort of Seattle fad, aren't they? I
    > would imagine in other cities, if a man wears what some people would call a
    > skirt, someone's going to get beat up. Here, they seem to have some
    > popularity among the working class and certain Gen X types. Do men wear them
    > in other places?
    >
    > (just curious)


    definitely not here in boise. i live in the (not a) liberal neighbourhood
    in the state and could probably pull it off.

    did you really mean gen x'ers? most of us are in our thirties now. aiiyy...
    --
    david reuteler
    [email protected]
     
  17. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s51>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > http://utilikilts.com/catalog-workman-index.htm

    > >
    > > you, uhh, been able to pull that off at work? (heh)

    >
    > Kinda off-topic, but, utilikilts are a sort of Seattle fad, aren't they? I
    > would imagine in other cities, if a man wears what some people would call a
    > skirt, someone's going to get beat up. Here, they seem to have some
    > popularity among the working class and certain Gen X types. Do men wear them
    > in other places?


    Like Scotland? I imagine so!


    --
    Dave Kerber
    Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  18. Claire Petersky wrote:

    >
    > Kinda off-topic, but, utilikilts are a sort of Seattle fad, aren't they? I
    > would imagine in other cities, if a man wears what some people would call a
    > skirt, someone's going to get beat up. Here, they seem to have some
    > popularity among the working class and certain Gen X types. Do men wear them
    > in other places?


    Not in this corner of Ohio.

    I have friends in an Irish band, who recently took to performing in
    kilts. One of them recently told me that he picked up an extra one very
    cheap - hinting I could buy it.

    Not interested. I think he's going to have that extra kilt for a long time.


    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  19. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 22:54:11 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Kinda off-topic, but, utilikilts are a sort of Seattle fad, aren't they? I
    >would imagine in other cities, if a man wears what some people would call a
    >skirt, someone's going to get beat up. Here, they seem to have some
    >popularity among the working class and certain Gen X types. Do men wear them
    >in other places?


    The only time I've _ever_ seen a man in a kilt is when he's dressed
    up in complete traditional garb for an appropriate event.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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