I've bent my forks, haven't I?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Westie, Jun 28, 2003.

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  1. Westie

    Westie Guest

    Just a quick question to put me out of my misery; I've been looking at my Manitou Skareb Comp forks
    today. The wheel should be centred in the fork, shouldn't it? I'm looking at mine and the tyre and
    rim are not centred and it gets worse when I put my weight on it. Looking at it from a riding
    position, the top of the wheel moves to the left when I put my weight on it and the knobbies on the
    tyre are almost rubbing the (Manitou reverse) arch. There's only a 1/4" clearance on that side
    versus the 3/4" on the righthand side. And none when I hit any half decent bump - the tyre rubs
    against the arch. The quick release is mounted and tightened correctly. And while the wheel isn't
    100% true (it's got maybe a couple of mm wobble), it does appear to be dished OK. The disc rotor is
    not rubbing on the pads.
    --
    Westie
     
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  2. "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Just a quick question to put me out of my misery; I've been looking at my Manitou Skareb Comp
    > forks today. The wheel should be centred in the fork,

    Um. You want to eBay that piece ASAP. State the problem. You'll get at least $100 for it.

    My Skareb Comp seems to flex quite a bit. My rim brakes rub against the rim during turns. No
    damage ever.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  3. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just a quick question to put me out of my misery; I've been looking at my Manitou Skareb Comp forks
    >today. The wheel should be centred in the fork, shouldn't it? I'm looking at mine and the tyre and
    >rim are not centred and it gets worse when I put my weight on it. Looking at it from a riding
    >position, the top of the wheel moves to the left when I put my weight on it and the knobbies on the
    >tyre are almost rubbing the (Manitou reverse) arch. There's only a 1/4" clearance on that side
    >versus the 3/4" on the righthand side. And none when I hit any half decent bump - the tyre rubs
    >against the arch. The quick release is mounted and tightened correctly. And while the wheel isn't
    >100% true (it's got maybe a couple of mm wobble), it does appear to be dished OK. The disc rotor is
    >not rubbing on the pads.

    I would suggest NOT riding that fork any more. There aren't many things on modern forks that can
    bend without being nearly ready to break (since they're all made out of "brittle" materials like
    aluminum or magnesium instead of steel or ti).

    Even if a catastrophic failure isn't in the cards, if the fork is flexing enough to cause
    tire-to-fork interference, what happens when you're really flying and land a big jump, and the front
    tire grabs enough fork to send you over the bars? Not a good thing.

    Life is too short to ride a broken fork (especially if you do).

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  4. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Mark Hickey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gndvfv0bj[email protected]...
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Just a quick question to put me out of my misery; I've been looking at my Manitou Skareb Comp
    > >forks today. The wheel should be centred in the
    fork,
    > >shouldn't it? I'm looking at mine and the tyre and rim are not centred
    and
    > >it gets worse when I put my weight on it. Looking at it from a riding position, the top of the
    > >wheel moves to the left when I put my weight on
    it
    > >and the knobbies on the tyre are almost rubbing the (Manitou reverse)
    arch.
    > >There's only a 1/4" clearance on that side versus the 3/4" on the
    righthand
    > >side. And none when I hit any half decent bump - the tyre rubs against
    the
    > >arch. The quick release is mounted and tightened correctly. And while the wheel isn't 100% true
    > >(it's got maybe a couple of mm
    wobble),
    > >it does appear to be dished OK. The disc rotor is not rubbing on the
    pads.
    >
    > I would suggest NOT riding that fork any more. There aren't many things on modern forks that can
    > bend without being nearly ready to break (since they're all made out of "brittle" materials like
    > aluminum or magnesium instead of steel or ti).
    >
    > Even if a catastrophic failure isn't in the cards, if the fork is flexing enough to cause
    > tire-to-fork interference, what happens when you're really flying and land a big jump, and the
    > front tire grabs enough fork to send you over the bars? Not a good thing.

    True enough. I've been over the bars before and I've done my AC collarbone joint. I don't care to
    repeat that.

    > Life is too short to ride a broken fork (especially if you do).

    I'm not riding it (now) until I get the problem sorted. The bike is visiting the Bike Doctor today.
    Thanks for the input!
    --
    Westie
     
  5. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mark Hickey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Just a quick question to put me out of my misery; I've been looking at
    my
    > > >Manitou Skareb Comp forks today. The wheel should be centred in the
    > fork,
    > > >shouldn't it? I'm looking at mine and the tyre and rim are not centred
    > and
    > > >it gets worse when I put my weight on it. Looking at it from a riding position, the top of the
    > > >wheel moves to the left when I put my weight
    on
    > it
    > > >and the knobbies on the tyre are almost rubbing the (Manitou reverse)
    > arch.
    > > >There's only a 1/4" clearance on that side versus the 3/4" on the
    > righthand
    > > >side. And none when I hit any half decent bump - the tyre rubs against
    > the
    > > >arch. The quick release is mounted and tightened correctly. And while the wheel isn't 100% true
    > > >(it's got maybe a couple of mm
    > wobble),
    > > >it does appear to be dished OK. The disc rotor is not rubbing on the

    Phew! I feel a lot better today. Good thing that I didn't keep riding it... Sent bike off to not-so
    Local Bike Shop. They've examined things. And they've found a beautiful crack in the arch, hidden
    under a ziptie near the seals. The mechanic reckons that I must have done the tie up too tight ;-)
    It's a warranty job apparently. We're all happy.
    --
    Westie
     
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