Lightweight breathable waterproofs

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Ian, Jul 1, 2003.

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  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    What do people use, which are best and which are best value?

    Ian
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Ian wrote:
    > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?

    "best" is a term requiring context... General agreement seems to be that breathable technology
    these days is not actually breathable *enough* for cycling unless you're on a reasonably sedate
    trundle, so you have a choice of something more breathable but less waterproof or something that's
    a bit sweaty.

    On shorter trips the "keep the worst off" method works pretty well IME, but on a long trip in cooler
    weather it can just get to the point where you never warm up and that can be intensely miserable.

    I find that for a fully waterproof jacket (generally one I'll be wearing for slow hacks around town
    or getting tipped on for long spells) then things like length, cut, pocket size/position and the
    like are all important things, and since everyone's a different size and shape and have different
    preferences that means there's no surfer suggestion. I use a Ronhill one that's okay, but I can't
    really recommend it 'cause they don't make it any more...

    Overtrousers are IMHO pretty ghastly things and I usually do without, preferring something that
    dries out fast, but same argument as above for prolonged rain on cooler days, or when you're on a
    local trip and want to arrive not looking like you've just climbed out of a river. Because your legs
    are doing the hard work they'll generally keep warm better than upstairs.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Ian wrote:
    > > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?
    >
    > "best" is a term requiring context... General agreement seems to be that breathable technology
    > these days is not actually breathable *enough* for cycling unless you're on a reasonably sedate
    > trundle, so you have a choice of something more breathable but less waterproof or something that's
    > a bit sweaty.

    Ian got there about 5mins before I was about to post the same question!

    Is the lightweight Gore-Tex stuff worth the extra money?

    I'm looking for something very light to pack away and forget if the South Downs is sunny, but which
    will keep the worst off if it's wet. The walking/hiking waterproof I've used before is just too
    bulky and heavy to carry all weekend and not use!

    Paul
     
  4. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB275482.7F29%[email protected]...
    > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?

    I have Goretex, I either wear it and get wet from sweat or leave it off and get wet from rain. Being
    a bit of a Luddite, mostly I use a good old fashioned cape, but then I don't race or ride at any
    great speed.

    Bill
     
  5. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Ian wrote:
    > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?

    It's mostly too warm this time of year for any kind of waterproofs. Carrying a spare shirt/jersey is
    one alternative way of dealing with showers (be dry afterwards).

    ~PB
     
  6. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    "wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > He added: "In 2001, not one inch of tarmac increased England's road
    network,
    > for the first time since tarmac was invented in the 1860s.

    Odd statement. No bypasses made at all in that year?
     
  7. Paul Bromley

    Paul Bromley Guest

    I agree with these posts. I don't rate gortex if you're biking with any sort of a sweat on. It may
    be breathable but not enough for cycling. Once the sweat condensates on the inside you've
    effectively "shorted" out the breathability of the fabric, blocking the holes. I have a Gore paclite
    based Castelli Laris jacket (£150+) . In the summer it's too warm and I tend to dress down and just
    get wet (Commute to and from work so there's a hot shower at either end which helps)

    In the winter I get soaked in sweat through overheating with the jacket on. The same applies to a
    set of gortex winter gloves I have - I didn't realise your hands could sweat so much!

    One thing I will say is those Altura overshoes are worth their weight in gold

    My advice would be to save your money and use a bin liner! Lets be honest on those days you need to
    reach for the Gortex you may be in two minds about reaching for the ignition keys ! so it can be an
    expensive waste of money for those few days a year when the weather is really that bad

    For breathability I prefer to use pertex , such as the Amazon shell. The down side is that it isn't
    waterproof. and IMO the Amazon shells are a little too expensive these days for what else is
    available.

    On the plus side I did see a Gill breathable jacket in the sale for £65 some months back which I
    thought was excellent value

    I also agree with the post on overtrousers. I hate them and tend to use quick drying teflon coated
    provision bib tights in the winter and just cycling shorts in the summer

    On the same lines I was in the local mountain/walking/outdoor type shop some months ago and saw a
    jacket in the shop advertised as begining made of something bigining with P (something South
    American sounding name) that was supposed to be breathable and waterproof and the demo stand had a
    jacket with all pins stuck through it to demonstrate it's robustness. Presumably it hasn't caught on
    as I've not heard of it since. Anyone else heard of it?

    Paul

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB275482.7F29%[email protected]...
    > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?
    >
    > Ian
     
  8. Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ian wrote:
    > > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?
    >

    I've got a Karrimor City Limits jacket. Traffic-cone orange for visibility - really stands out,
    which is what I was after. Very waterproof & I don't get too sweaty in it on moderate
    leisure/fitness/commute rides.

    It got a 10/10 review off Cycling Plus, FWIW. Note that it has *no* groovy extras such as pockets,
    hood, pit-zips, etc. It's just a jacket & a good one at that.

    UKP£50 - see http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5300004806

    HTH
     
  9. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Paul Bromley
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On the same lines I was in the local mountain/walking/outdoor type shop some months ago and saw a
    >jacket in the shop advertised as begining made of something bigining with P (something South
    >American sounding name) that was supposed to be breathable and waterproof and the demo stand had a
    >jacket with all pins stuck through it to demonstrate it's robustness. Presumably it hasn't caught
    >on as I've not heard of it since. Anyone else heard of it?

    sounds like Paramo - originally made by Nikwax, has some following in the hiking market, but I think
    it is too thick/warm for cycling - though this maybe changing with newer products.

    <http://www.paramo.co.uk/>

    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  10. Steve

    Steve Guest

    > sounds like Paramo - originally made by Nikwax, has some following in the hiking market, but I
    > think it is too thick/warm for cycling - though this maybe changing with newer products.
    >
    > <http://www.paramo.co.uk/>

    'Tis indeed Paramo. I have a Paramo Alta jacket which is fine for walking but is way too hot for
    biking in though. It makes GoreTex (which I do use on the bike) look like bin bags in terms of
    breathability!

    Steve
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Paul Kelly <[email protected]> said:
    > >
    > > Ian got there about 5mins before I was about to post the same question!
    > >
    > > Is the lightweight Gore-Tex stuff worth the extra money?
    >
    > I wouldn't know, but I recently bought a lightweight waterproof from Wiggle (Gill Exodus- similar
    > to the Singletrack jacket) which is breathable (apparently). It weighs maybe 100g, rolls up very
    > small and is extremely waterproof, though as other posters have said not very breathable.

    100g? Are you sure about that? It's just that I do mountain marathons and lightweight stuff is the
    subject of much debate and desire. The lightest waterproof available that I know of is the
    Raidlight jacket at
    180g. There are some other waterproofs used by MMers around the 250g mark. 100g seems incredibly
    light for a waterproof (rather than just a windproof)

    Colin
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Paul Kelly wrote:

    > Is the lightweight Gore-Tex stuff worth the extra money?

    "it depends". If you're going for a fully waterproof jacket to keep out prolonged rain on cooler
    days or for relatively sedate short hacks then quite possibly: it is more brethable and more to the
    point it packs down much smaller for when you don't need it. But it still isn't nearly as breathable
    as Gore's marketing would like to think.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:

    : "it depends". If you're going for a fully waterproof jacket to keep out prolonged rain on cooler
    : days or for relatively sedate short hacks then quite possibly: it is more brethable and more to
    : the point it packs down much smaller for when you don't need it. But it still isn't nearly as
    : breathable as Gore's marketing would like to think.

    I paid £160 for a GoreTex PacLite jacket just becuase it was the only fully waterproof jacket I
    could find that fitted in a jersey pocket. For me, that made it worth the money.

    In summer, you may as well get wet though on shorter rides. On longer rides I take the jacket.

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  14. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Ian wrote:
    > > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?

    >
    > I find that for a fully waterproof jacket (generally one I'll be wearing for slow hacks around
    > town or getting tipped on for long spells) then things like length, cut, pocket size/position and
    > the like are all important things, and since everyone's a different size and shape and have
    > different preferences that means there's no surfer suggestion. I use a Ronhill one that's okay,
    > but I can't really recommend it 'cause they don't make it any more...

    I agree. I'll only take a fully waterproof jacket out on longer rides when it's likely to tip down.
    I use a GoreTex Century(?). It's cut for cycling, folds into it's own rear pocket ( and can then be
    strapped around my waist), and is as good now as when it was new - about four years ago. It's very
    waterproof but sweat does build up. As my general trundly/toury sort of pace is unlikely to be
    increased on days when I need to wear the jacket, the sweat only really becomes noticeable after
    working uphill or into a headwind. It wasn't cheap - c.£90 four years ago. On other days a very
    lightweight pertex windproof keeps the chill off and repels light showers well enough.
    >
    > Overtrousers are IMHO pretty ghastly things and I usually do without, preferring something that
    > dries out fast, but same argument as above for prolonged rain on cooler days, or when you're on a
    > local trip and want to arrive not looking like you've just climbed out of a river. Because your
    > legs are doing the hard work they'll generally keep warm better than upstairs.
    >
    > Pete.

    I generally agree again. However, on one occasion I found over-trousers useful. When doing the
    English C2C one November I woke up in Alston to a very cold wintry day. The rain seemed solid,
    visibility was very poor. If I hadn't had the Gore troos I don't think I'd have left that day. Of
    course they were waterlogged by the time I got off the hills - it didn't stop raining 'till Consett
    - but they were instrumental in getting me going in the first place. Not worth the money for one
    useful day though. And I know tougher types than me would have headed into the mist sporting nothing
    but SPD sandals.......

    tony R.
     
  15. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Geraint Jones <[email protected]> said:

    > More like a pound and a half (or three-quarters of a kilogram).

    That heavy? I really must buy some new kitchen scales...

    > But everyone's selling them at about fifty quid these days, and they're fine for pottering about
    > in the rain.

    They are indeed.

    Regards,

    -david
     
  16. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> said:

    > 100g? Are you sure about that? It's just that I do mountain marathons and lightweight stuff is the
    > subject of much debate and desire. The lightest waterproof available that I know of is the
    > Raidlight jacket at
    > 180g. There are some other waterproofs used by MMers around the 250g mark. 100g seems incredibly
    > light for a waterproof (rather than just a windproof)

    Doh! I really should be more careful with the numeric keypad. It should have read 400g.

    Sorry for the confusion!

    Regards,

    -david
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > David Nutter <[email protected]> wrote: ( Geraint Jones
    > <[email protected]> said: ) > More like a pound and a half (or
    > three-quarters of a kilogram). ( That heavy? I really must buy some new kitchen scales...
    >
    > Without the hood.
    >
    > I suppose it's always conceivable I rolled it up with something in the pockets. Hm. What haven't I
    > seen recently... ?

    What about the 350g bar of chocolate?

    Colin
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> said:
    >
    > > 100g? Are you sure about that? It's just that I do mountain marathons and lightweight stuff is
    > > the subject of much debate and desire. The lightest waterproof available that I know of is the
    > > Raidlight jacket at
    > > 180g. There are some other waterproofs used by MMers around the 250g mark. 100g seems incredibly
    > > light for a waterproof (rather than just a windproof)
    >
    > Doh! I really should be more careful with the numeric keypad. It should have read 400g.
    >
    > Sorry for the confusion!

    No worries, it's just with a MM coming up this weekend I would have ended up rushing out and buying
    yet another lightweight waterproof if it had been 100g.

    Colin
     
  19. Davep

    Davep Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    > Ian wrote:
    > > What do people use, which are best and which are best value?
    >
    > It's mostly too warm this time of year for any kind of waterproofs. Carrying a spare shirt/jersey
    > is one alternative way of dealing with showers (be dry afterwards).
    >
    > ~PB

    good idea Pete , but what about the 2nd or 3rd shower. during the last week I've had a a few
    downpours during my 14mile commute and my Lusso is only windproof/showerproof so these replies are
    quit handy. I don't like _staying_ wet ( in summer ) when it's not a nice sunny day,
    i.e when the temperatures dropped a bit and your jersey is unlikely to dry out. The Karrimor City
    Limits sounds good, but I guess a bin liner will do the job for free.

    anyone got a Hind Clearview, 13.99 , at wiggle , do the side panel vents stop you cooking?

    davep
     
  20. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Geraint Jones <[email protected]> said:
    > David Nutter <[email protected]> wrote: ( Geraint Jones
    > <[email protected]> said: ) > More like a pound and a half (or
    > three-quarters of a kilogram). ( That heavy? I really must buy some new kitchen scales...
    >
    > Without the hood.
    >
    > I suppose it's always conceivable I rolled it up with something in the pockets. Hm. What haven't I
    > seen recently... ?

    It's *much* more concievable that either my scales are broken or I'm a muppet
    :)

    In my defence, staying up til 3am drinking beer and playing Guerilla is extremely punishing to the
    old gray matter; mistakes are to be expected.

    Regards,

    -david
     
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