OT: Grocery Greetings

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by aem, Mar 21, 2005.

  1. aem

    aem Guest

    Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is before
    I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name (off the
    receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so friggin sick
    of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    transaction I could barf. I have lived in a small town, so I know what
    genuine personal recognition is, and this corporate management-directed
    bonhomie is not it. So here are my questions.

    To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    get them to stop? -aem
     
    Tags:


  2. nancree

    nancree Guest

    I'd say, "leave well enough alone". (grin) You can't be serious.
    I can't imagine asking someone to "not speak to me unless I speak to
    you first".
    In So. Cal. they are so helpful--if I ask where something is, they
    offer to run and get it. The supermarkets are huge here, so your
    "genuine personal recognition" is not very probable. Just be glad
    you're not in Manhattan, where they won't even look up if you ask a
    question.
    For myself, it doesn't bother me, and I smile back with a "no thank
    you".
    Cheer up, now. Good wishes !
    Nancree
     
  3. Ruddell

    Ruddell Guest

    In <[email protected]> aem wrote:
    > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is
    > before I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name (
    > off the receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so
    > friggin sick of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an
    > impersonal business transaction I could barf. I have lived in a small
    > town, so I know what genuine personal recognition is, and this
    > corporate management-directed bonhomie is not it. So here are my
    > questions.
    >
    > To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > get them to stop? -aem


    My gawd, has it come to this already? Our stores are still pretty basic
    ignore unless you ask someone a question, then they reply with the charm
    turned on, which is ok.

    I guess you could talk to the management but how to ask them to tone
    down the phony friendly atmosphere might be a bit tricky...might be best
    to find if there's a website you can email to...


    --
    Cheers

    Dennis

    Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
     
  4. On Mon 21 Mar 2005 08:54:11p, aem wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is before
    > I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name (off the
    > receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so friggin sick
    > of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    > transaction I could barf. I have lived in a small town, so I know what
    > genuine personal recognition is, and this corporate management-directed
    > bonhomie is not it. So here are my questions.
    >
    > To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > get them to stop? -aem


    LOL! Why not just say "Shut the [email protected]#% up!" I'm sure they'd comply.

    Frankly, I don't want them to stop. I appreciate the help when I need it,
    and most employees greet me with a smile that I feel is genuine. When I
    express a need for help to one of their enquiries, they're always more than
    happy to do so.

    Having said that, I originally came from a city where no one spoke a damn
    word and finding someone to help you when you needed it was a major
    searching expedition.

    On second thought, why not just chill and nod?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  5. "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon 21 Mar 2005 09:33:55p, aem wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > >
    > > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > >>[snip]
    > >> LOL! Why not just say "Shut the [email protected]#% up!" I'm sure they'd comply.
    > >>
    > >> Frankly, I don't want them to stop. I appreciate the help when I need
    > >> it, and most employees greet me with a smile that I feel is genuine.
    > >> When I express a need for help to one of their enquiries, they're
    > >> always more than happy to do so.

    > >
    > > I also appreciate the help. When I need it, I ask for it, and they
    > > give it to me, and I'm grateful for that. It's the phony solicitation
    > > when I have not looked in their direction that unsettles me.
    > >>
    > >> On second thought, why not just chill and nod?

    > >
    > > That's what I do. I'm looking for an improvement. -aem

    >
    > I'd hate to see it "improved" out of existence, but since I doubt we live
    > in the same city, that's not likely to happen here.
    >
    > You might try a friendly and sincere approach with the manager, explaining
    > that you feel their approaches are a bit more invasive than you like.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    > ____________________________________________
    >
    > Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    > Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974




    Try a sly wink and a kissy face in the direction of the false
    sincerity.....usually scares the hell out of them, especially if they are
    younglings and you are, alas, a middle aged, slightly lumpy adult....makes
    them wonder what they started and probably couldn't stop.
    -Ginny
     
  6. Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Mon 21 Mar 2005 08:54:11p, aem wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > > normal time.


    There's an economic/politico "crunch" going on in the U.S. of A.

    [socioeconopolonometrics]

    Waiting for the Prince to come.

    How have i got here, what have i done?

    However that may effect the rest of the world i only assimilation (i say
    only as i did not have time to say "merely") the "Planetary" crunch.

    "Oops"

    Ooops or "eeeps" as the case may be.
    ---
    JL
     
  7. Joseph Littleshoes wrote:

    Merely choosing.
    ---
    JL
     
  8. "aem" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    >question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    >get them to stop?


    I wish I were there to teach you "The Look." I used to take the bus to and
    from work. When I was concentrating intensely and staring blankly out the
    window, the seat next to mine would be the only empty seat on the bus, and
    I noticed that people would stand in the aisle rather than sit with me. I
    must look dangerous or something. Well, I paid attention to that face, and
    I can put it on when I want to be left alone. Try walking through the
    store with a zombie stare, and never make eye contact. If they approach
    you anyway, give them a look with a flat, deadpan stare. They might just
    pee themselves.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at ya live from beautiful downtown Mayberry.
     
  9. Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >Frankly, I don't want them to stop. I appreciate the help when I need it,
    >and most employees greet me with a smile that I feel is genuine. When I
    >express a need for help to one of their enquiries, they're always more than
    >happy to do so.
    >
    >Having said that, I originally came from a city where no one spoke a damn
    >word and finding someone to help you when you needed it was a major
    >searching expedition.


    Over a year ago, Crash went to the Super WalMart without me (we usually do
    everything together). The clerk, after checking us through a half dozen
    times, looked at Crash that night and asked where Carol was. I'm still
    shocked over that one.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at ya live from beautiful downtown Mayberry.
     
  10. Puester

    Puester Guest

    aem wrote:
    > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is before
    > I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name (off the
    > receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so friggin sick
    > of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    > transaction I could barf. I have lived in a small town, so I know what
    > genuine personal recognition is, and this corporate management-directed
    > bonhomie is not it. So here are my questions.
    >
    > To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > get them to stop? -aem
    >



    Blame WALMART. (For everything.....)

    gloria p
     
  11. Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "aem" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask
    > >a question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference,
    > >could we get them to stop?

    >
    > I wish I were there to teach you "The Look." I used to take the bus
    > to and from work. When I was concentrating intensely and staring
    > blankly out the window, the seat next to mine would be the only
    > empty seat on the bus, and I noticed that people would stand in the
    > aisle rather than sit with me. I must look dangerous or something.
    > Well, I paid attention to that face, and I can put it on when I want
    > to be left alone. Try walking through the store with a zombie
    > stare, and never make eye contact. If they approach you anyway,
    > give them a look with a flat, deadpan stare. They might just pee
    > themselves.
    >
    > Carol


    Carol you CAN"T post this you're invisible!

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  12. Puester

    Puester Guest


    > Dog3 <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    >
    >>They don't do that in the supermarkets here. I've only experienced it at
    >>Home Depot and it is annoying since the clerks don't know diddly at Home
    >>Depot. I'm not sure if I got the spelling right. I'd just as soon shop all
    >>by my lonesome and ask someone a question if I had one.

    >
    >



    Funny, in my experience most local Home Depot employees are
    VERY knowlegeable in all fields of construction and home repair and if
    there's something they don't know, they will call someone who does.
    Many times we have been steered away from our original concept to
    something easier, less expensive, and better as a repair.

    gloria p
     
  13. Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I wish I were there to teach you "The Look."

    >
    >Carol you CAN"T post this you're invisible!


    I have bandages wrapped all over myself, so I'm quite visible. As of last
    night, I only become invisible for baths and for Crash. :D

    Carol
    --
    Coming at ya live from beautiful downtown Mayberry.
     
  14. "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Frankly, I don't want them to stop. I appreciate the help when I need

    it,
    > >and most employees greet me with a smile that I feel is genuine. When I
    > >express a need for help to one of their enquiries, they're always more

    than
    > >happy to do so.
    > >
    > >Having said that, I originally came from a city where no one spoke a damn
    > >word and finding someone to help you when you needed it was a major
    > >searching expedition.

    >
    > Over a year ago, Crash went to the Super WalMart without me (we usually do
    > everything together). The clerk, after checking us through a half dozen
    > times, looked at Crash that night and asked where Carol was. I'm still
    > shocked over that one.


    " Coming at ya live from beautiful downtown Mayberry."

    I am a partially sighted,Piano Tuner.There is a small chain store here where
    I do most of my shopping. We all know each other by "face or name". I once
    forgot my check book in the height of summer. I asked them to hold the order
    until I could return. They said"take it with you before things spoil." If I
    am ill,I can send someone for me,and there is no problem. We know each
    other. It took some time. They have learned that I ask questions,and choose
    to carry my own bags :).

    Hubert
     
  15. On Mon, 21 Mar 2005, aem wrote:

    > I am so friggin sick
    > of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    > transaction I could barf.


    I'm with you. I'm sure everyone won't agree, but I personally don't
    like being forced to interact with a total stranger for no reason, and
    when 5 or 6 employees have played this game I'm ready to leave, and
    sometimes do. My response to is to blatantly ignore them, which is a
    cold response to a rude intrusion.

    This doesn't apply to sincere people who are _actually_ trying to be
    helpful...only to the corporate automatrons.

    Jeneen
     
  16. carbuff

    carbuff Guest

    "Jeneen Sommers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 21 Mar 2005, aem wrote:
    >
    >> I am so friggin sick
    >> of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    >> transaction I could barf.

    >
    > I'm with you. I'm sure everyone won't agree, but I personally don't
    > like being forced to interact with a total stranger for no reason, and
    > when 5 or 6 employees have played this game I'm ready to leave, and
    > sometimes do. My response to is to blatantly ignore them, which is a
    > cold response to a rude intrusion.
    >
    > This doesn't apply to sincere people who are _actually_ trying to be
    > helpful...only to the corporate automatrons.
    >
    > Jeneen


    Nice attitude, ladies! At what point in your lives did you conclude that
    your shit doesn't stink?
    If it's any consolation, the clerks that greet you are probably less
    inclined to do so than you are to hear it. It's corporate doctrine in most
    cases.
     
  17. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "carbuff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:5GZ%[email protected]
    >
    > "Jeneen Sommers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >> On Mon, 21 Mar 2005, aem wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am so friggin sick
    >>> of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    >>> transaction I could barf.

    >>
    >> I'm with you. I'm sure everyone won't agree, but I personally don't
    >> like being forced to interact with a total stranger for no reason, and
    >> when 5 or 6 employees have played this game I'm ready to leave, and
    >> sometimes do. My response to is to blatantly ignore them, which is a
    >> cold response to a rude intrusion.
    >>
    >> This doesn't apply to sincere people who are _actually_ trying to be
    >> helpful...only to the corporate automatrons.
    >>
    >> Jeneen

    >
    > Nice attitude, ladies! At what point in your lives did you conclude that
    > your shit doesn't stink?
    > If it's any consolation, the clerks that greet you are probably less
    > inclined to do so than you are to hear it. It's corporate doctrine in
    > most cases.


    I think that has been established, they know it's policy. That is what
    makes it so grating.

    nancy
     
  18. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    aem wrote:
    > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is
    > before I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name
    > (off the receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so
    > friggin sick of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an
    > impersonal business transaction I could barf. I have lived in a
    > small town, so I know what genuine personal recognition is, and this
    > corporate management-directed bonhomie is not it. So here are my
    > questions.
    >
    > To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > get them to stop? -aem


    It's a store policy. They are paid to be polite and greet you. And they
    aren't paid very much. However, it does get annoying. Just say "hi" and
    offer me a cart or a basket, then... go away.

    Jill
     
  19. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    aem wrote:

    > Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is before
    > I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name (off the
    > receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so friggin sick
    > of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an impersonal business
    > transaction I could barf. I have lived in a small town, so I know what
    > genuine personal recognition is, and this corporate management-directed
    > bonhomie is not it. So here are my questions.
    >
    > To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > get them to stop? -aem


    It's nice to be genuinely welcomed into a store, but to have someone
    standing at the door with a smiley face pasted on and a superficial display
    of welcome is meaningless. Don't have some pleasant old retired person
    welcoming me into the store for minimum wage. Have someone working on the
    floor who can help me when I need help. Treat me with respect when I come
    in through the doors, instead of having a phoney smile and want to staple
    my bags closed with a tag on so that you won't have reason to think I have
    shoved things into my bags without paying for them. I refuse to enter a
    store where they take pre-emptive steps to prevent me from shoplifting when
    I had no intention of stealing anything.
     
  20. MJ

    MJ Guest

    As an employee of a grocery store i am speaking on behalf of them.
    We are not able to please everyone...if we dont acknowledge you we get
    condemned for not being polite..and if we are having a bad day and look
    miserable we hear "i can tell someone doesnt like her job"
    Therefore we do what we are recommended to do by our employer to save our
    jobs and to try and keep everyone happy. So if all everyone can do is think
    about how we make them feel..think about how you make us feel?..when we do
    ask you if you need help with anything (not knowing that you have already
    been asked of course) we get looked at like we are stupid and rude when all
    we are trying to do is help.
    Now look at it this way..if you went to a store not knowing what you were
    looking for and not a single person asked you if you needed help. Then when
    you do ask for help you come across that one person who is having a bad day
    and instead of being phony they let their true colors come through. Now you
    tell me if you would go back to that store again?
    So therefore it might just be good that we put on a front for the customers
    and try to be nice wether we are in a good mood or not cause trust me you
    wouldnt want to come across me on a bad day.
    So maybe you all just might want to think of the store clerks also and not
    just about how you are being treated by overly nice grocery personal.
    MJ
    "Tina Marrie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ions ago, I did "mystery shopping" at a Kroger. The corporate stores

    require
    > their employees to communicate with you if you within so may feet of them.
    > The corporate office then hires "mystery shoppers" to visit the store,

    every
    > department to check up on these requirements. The rules are many and yes
    > annoying. If a mystery shopper comes into the store, and they are not

    spoken
    > to, the "spy" then takes down their name and department (located on name
    > tag) and puts it into the report. Of course the low paid worker then gets
    > called in to the office after the report has been released...
    >
    > So annoying as it may be, many of these workers rely heavily on this job

    to
    > support their families. Take it with a grain of salt.
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:eek:4_%[email protected]
    > > aem wrote:
    > >> Went to the market today with a longer list than normal so I found
    > >> myself in every section of the store, spending more than twice my
    > >> normal time. No fewer than six employees greeted me: "Hi, how are
    > >> you? How're you doing? How's it going? How are you? Can I help you
    > >> find anything? Is there anything I can help you with?" This is
    > >> before I got to the checkout line where the checker thanks me by name
    > >> (off the receipt) and the bagger asks if I want help out. I am so
    > >> friggin sick of this fake personalizing of what is in fact an
    > >> impersonal business transaction I could barf. I have lived in a
    > >> small town, so I know what genuine personal recognition is, and this
    > >> corporate management-directed bonhomie is not it. So here are my
    > >> questions.
    > >>
    > >> To whom do I express my preference not to be spoken to unless I ask a
    > >> question? And, if enough people stated a similar preference, could we
    > >> get them to stop? -aem

    > >
    > > It's a store policy. They are paid to be polite and greet you. And

    they
    > > aren't paid very much. However, it does get annoying. Just say "hi"

    and
    > > offer me a cart or a basket, then... go away.
    > >
    > > Jill
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
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