Redbud Classic: Recumbent bikes allow many to extend riding time

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Okiemoose, Apr 6, 2003.

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  1. Okiemoose

    Okiemoose Guest

    Thought the newsgroup might enjoy seeing this. It's from the sports section of Oklahoma's largest
    newspaper, which has statewide circulation.

    ---------------------------------------------

    The Sunday Oklahoman Oklahoma City, OK Sunday, April 6, 2003

    Redbud Classic: Recumbent bikes allow many to extend riding time

    By Josh Ward The Oklahoman

    Paul Thompson looked too comfortable for a man who just rode a bicycle 33 miles. As participants in
    the Redbud Classic bicycling events dismounted and headed for water stands, the pancake tent or a
    massage therapist Saturday morning, Thompson coasted up to the Waterford Complex reclined in a
    position suitable for napping. Don't be fooled by his posture. Thompson rode 33 miles -- but he
    intended to go 50.

    "The wind caught up with me," said Thompson, one of an estimated 1,000 participants in the Redbud
    cycling events through Nichols Hills. "I didn't prepare myself like I should've."

    Thompson is part of the ever-growing popularity of recumbent bicycles, a variation on the standard
    design that allows a rider to sit reclined in a seat as opposed to on top of one, providing a
    less-painful option for long-distance riders.

    "They say 'You look too comfortable,' " Thompson said. "People on uprights, within a mile or two
    they're already shifting in their seats. "

    Redbud cyclists rode in tours of 10-, 33- and 50-miles and a new 100-kilometer (62.1 miles) tour.
    The 21st annual Redbud Classic's main event comes today with a 2 p.m. 10-kilometer (6.2 mile) race.
    Today's events also include an inline skating race at 1:30 p.m., a wheelchair event at 1:45
    p.m., a 2-mile run to coincide with the 10K race and a citizen's walk.

    Bikes like Thompson's recumbent bicycle have been around for years and their popularity is booming,
    especially with older riders or those who find standard bikes too uncomfortable.

    "It's extended my biking life until I'm 90," said Thompson, a 46-year-old father of two who made the
    switch after 30 years of riding a standard bike. "But the young kids turn their nose up at it."

    Thompson wasn't the only rider to be reclined on a bike during the ride. He estimated between 20 and
    30 recumbent riders navigated the Redbud course. The bikes are becoming so popular among riders,
    Thompson said, that many events --including the Redbud Classic -- have begun classifying this style
    of riding in its own category.

    Two years ago, before the reclassification, a recumbent rider won the Redbud Classic.

    "People are starting to come over and not thinking it's just a fad," Thompson said.

    But despite its casual posture in a sport dominated by hand- made, high-tech and aerodynamic
    machines, Thompson said his bike gives him as good a workout as the others, with a slight
    difference.

    "On a recumbent," Thompson said, "it's all legs. The higher your feet are, the more efficient
    you'll be."

    But the bikes, Thompson admits, aren't perfect.

    "I'll pass everyone going downhill but I'm nice to them," Thompson said. "Because going up, the guys
    I passed will be passing me."
     
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  2. Mike S

    Mike S Guest

    "Okiemoose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thought the newsgroup might enjoy seeing this. It's from the sports section of Oklahoma's largest
    > newspaper, which has statewide circulation.
    >

    Thanks for the posting. The article was great. Last summer we took the bikes and rode out west, with
    rides set up every day. Unfortunately, the only ride scheduled where we were treated as outcasts was
    in Oklahoma City. Hopefully, with articles like this, and with Oklahoma recumbent riders
    demonstrating through deeds that this is not a passing fad, provincial attitudes from the upwrongs
    will change.

    Mike S.
     
  3. Azqaz

    Azqaz Guest

    "Okiemoose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thought the newsgroup might enjoy seeing this. It's from the sports section of Oklahoma's largest
    > newspaper, which has statewide circulation.
    >
    <snip>

    Along the lines of recumbents in the news, this past Sunday in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Travel
    and Leisure section there was an article about traveling the Natchez Trace, and there on the
    sections front page were a husband and wife on a pair of LWB bents set up for touring.

    Bryan
     
  4. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    > But the bikes, Thompson admits, aren't perfect.
    >
    > "I'll pass everyone going downhill but I'm nice to them," Thompson said. "Because going up, the
    > guys I passed will be passing me."

    It would be so nice if 'bent riders would help dismiss this goofy stereotype when they're talking to
    reporters.

    I have ALWAYS been faster uphill on my Rans rocket than on any other bike I've ever owned...

    (Grrrrr.)

    Sj
     
  5. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    Seth Jayson wrote:
    >>But the bikes, Thompson admits, aren't perfect.
    >>
    >>"I'll pass everyone going downhill but I'm nice to them," Thompson said. "Because going up, the
    >>guys I passed will be passing me."
    >
    >
    > It would be so nice if 'bent riders would help dismiss this goofy stereotype when they're talking
    > to reporters.
    >
    > I have ALWAYS been faster uphill on my Rans rocket than on any other bike I've ever owned...

    But maybe Thompson isn't. When you get interviewed, you can tell it your way.
     
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