RR: Copper Canyon, Mexico (Very Long)

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Ride-A-Lot, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    WARNING: This is very long, but I think it is important to add culture
    to the report. You can read it here or with the pictures in-line at
    http://tinyurl.com/3l22f
    -----

    It's funny how most American's view Mexico. It's always a vision of the
    border towns that taint our view of what a country can show the world.
    Once you reach the interior, one is opened to a unique culture full of
    vibrant friendly people. Though they do not have much, it doesn't seem
    to bother them and they make the most with what they do have.

    This is my adventure report. Yes, it contains mountain biking but it
    also contains history, culture, and an understanding for what makes us
    all unique in this world. Beauty is everywhere in Mexico. It is in the
    hills, valleys, homes, and people. It is the innocence of the children,
    who have not been spoiled by video games or kept inside by predators.
    It is the miles of trails cut by the indigenous tribes who to this day
    use them as their roadways to each village.

    The Copper Canyon is a general name used to describe an area of Mexico
    that is actually five different canyons branching out like fingers on a
    hand. These canyons were formed millions of years ago by tectonic and
    water activities. Unlike the Grand Canyon, the Copper Canyon is a lush
    green semi-tropical environment filled with a variety of plants ranging
    from pine trees to cacti and a variety of wildlife. The Canyons are
    home to the Tahamara Indians. Until the discovery of Silver in the late
    1800's, they were so remote that they were able to preserve their
    heritage.

    The trip was run by Western Spirit. It is actually their first branded
    trip to this location. Our guides Scott and his wife Rachel were
    fantastic hosts who spoke Spanish and had a good knowledge of the area.
    They were also not afraid to drive on the crazy roads of Mexico. I am
    traveling with a JAR club buddy, Roger. There were eight strangers who
    we quickly got acquainted to.

    Day 1

    It's not an easy task to get to the Copper Canyon. It took me a day to
    fly into El Paso, Texas we're we spend the night. First thing in the
    morning, we load up the van and I'm glad to see my bike has made the
    journey.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0127.jpg

    We head out across the border and arrive at Mexican immigration. My
    previous experience with Mexico was 13 years ago in Cancun. This isn't
    Cancun and it took an hour and a half to get through here!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0129.jpg

    A stop to gas up the van nets this lovely little food stand. Do I dare
    attempt to eat something from here? After deciding that I have not even
    ridden a foot yet, I leave the possible belly busting to later in the week.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0136.jpg

    Our destination today, is Creel. Creel is located 7450 feet above the
    canyon. I begin to feel the altitude and I'm glad I'll have a day to
    adjust. On the way into town, we follow this Mexican version of a horse
    trailer. In this case it's a burro standing in a pickup. We all
    thought it was quite amusing and would certainly lead to legal problems
    in the states.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0140.jpg

    We have a nice dinner at the hotel and get a good night's sleep for
    tomorrow's ride which is supposed to have some nice technical singletrack.

    Day 2

    We get ready to head out on today's ride and are greeted by some future
    MTBers. There's something about shiny expensive mountain bikes that
    seem to grab everyone's attention. I brought a whole bunch of stickers
    with me which go over well with this bunch.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0148.jpg

    We are introduced to our Tahamara local guide, Enrice. Then up the
    hills we go. Lot's of loose brittle lava rock on this climb to keep us
    on the edge. I'm huffing my lungs out because of the altitude and guild
    isn't even breaking a sweat. The Tahamara are known for their
    remarkable endurance. They are some of the greatest runners in the
    world. Some can run a hundred miles in one shot! Enrice has incredible
    stamina and he's not a bad mountain biker either. He's one the MTB race
    that is held here.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0150.jpg

    At the top we get a great view of Creel.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0153.jpg

    These trails are used by humans, burros, cattle, dogs, chickens, and
    horses. They all live and die here. I'm hoping this is not a sign of
    how hard things are going to get!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0157.jpg

    Technical is the nature of the day. Enrice climbs these carved stairs,
    the rest of us opt for the left line. I take my share of spills here,
    but it's all good!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0160.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0163.jpg

    Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the best in
    the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well. The
    Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    Western Spirit guides for $350. That may seem cheap to us, but it's a
    lot of Pesos for him! He was jumping like a kid in a candy store when
    they gave it to him. He was riding a cheap hardtail before that. He's
    still learning English, but it's actually fun to speak Spanglish to him
    with a little sign language.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0170.jpg

    The bikes take a rest and we look out over the valley.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0172.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0173.jpg

    Now it's time to move down into the Valley of the Monks. This is a
    beautiful area named after the rock formations which look like monks
    standing in a line. It's a nice technical descent to the fields below.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0183.jpg

    We stop to ask the permission of a Tahamara women to ride through her
    field and I snap a quick picture. They are very shy people who usually
    turn away from the camera.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0189.jpg

    We reach the valley of the monks where the van is waiting with lunch.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0193.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0196.jpg

    After lunch we head down to Lake Arareco. It's a pleasant well
    maintained park area. Usually it's crystal blue, but some recent rain
    has mucked it up a bit.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0197.jpg

    We then ride some non-technical singletrack through fields to Mission
    San Ignacio which was built in the 1600's.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0201.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0204.jpg

    More technical singletrack up the hills and then back down to the hotel
    through this steep and loose downhill chute.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0210.jpg

    Back in town we have dinner at a local restaurant and check out some of
    the stores.

    Day 3

    Quiet in the town this morning as we get ready for a huge day.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0214.jpg

    Today we ride down into the Batopilas canyon. We load up the van and
    drive to our launching point. Off the main paved road we slowly
    navigate the van and trailer until a big enough clearing.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0227.jpg

    Then it's the beginning of our 6000' drop into the canyon. We ride the
    loose dirt road to a small store where we will wait for the Van to catch
    up and leave the trailer. This is because it will get very steep from
    here on in and the Van will have a hard enough time on it's own.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0230.jpg

    The owner's children come out to greet us while dad heads out to tend
    the field in traditional Tahamara dress.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0234.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0235.jpg

    The bikes take a rest while I buy three ice cold Coca-Colas.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0236.jpg

    We head off again and the road becomes looser and steeper. Too fast and
    you can easily wipe out, as some of us did (not me). The views from up
    here are breathless. And a look down shows us the road that lies ahead.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0239.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0241.jpg

    All along this road are little shrines. They are there for those who
    drive trucks up and down this treacherous exposed one lane road. At
    night they light candles to pray for safe passage.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0243.jpg

    Our Midway destination on this 32 mile mostly downhill ride is the
    bridge that you can barely make out in this picture.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0244.jpg

    This is perfect terrain for the Titus, but too much speed around these
    switchbacks could send one plummeting.

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    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0247.jpg

    My arms are beginning to feel the burn and we stop for everyone to catch
    some views and a group shot.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0248.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0250.jpg

    I think the burro (donkey) must be the Mexican national animal. They
    are all over the place and very tame. Here's a family of eey-ores along
    the way.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0252.jpg

    Finally, after seventeen miles straight down, we reach the bridge and
    take a dip in the Rio Batopilas. The water is very cold, but so refreshing!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0256.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0260.jpg

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    The next stop is our hotel, just 15 miles away. Although mostly
    downhill, there are some steep climbs interspersed along the way.

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    The first of a few suspension bridges we will see along the way. Some
    of them we will even walk across. Yes, they swing side to side!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0279.jpg

    Finally! We reach Magarita's La Hacienda in Batopilas. It is a
    magnificent hotel restored from the old Alex Sheppard silver mine ruins.
    The rooms were huge with vaulted ceilings and a shower that could fit
    my bike! We sit on the patio and have Cervesa's and a Coke for me
    before a wonderful homemade dinner.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0284.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0290.jpg

    Day 4

    Today is billed as an easy day. After yesterdays long and technical
    ride, it's a good thing. We ride into the town of Batopilas. It's a
    very quaint town of 1150 and they are slowly overhauling it. They are
    putting pavers in the roads and fixing up buildings. Obviously, the
    tourism money is starting to kick in. It looks very nice!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0292.jpg

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    Yet another suspension bridge to hang around on!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0306.jpg

    We then head on up the road to another old mission. This is the "Lost
    Cathedral" of Satevo. The mystery is that it pre-dates the town and no
    one knows how it got there or who was responsible for it.

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    Once again we are greeted by children and stickers are handed out to
    all. One of the kids digs two holes in the sand a few feet a part, then
    finds two small flat rocks, and a game of Mexican horseshoes begins. We
    spend quite a while here talking and playing with the children.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0357.jpg

    We ride out of this particular area and back into town for lunch on the
    porch of someones house. Later I am told it is a restaurant, but I
    certainly didn't see a sign. The food was very good (soup and salad
    with fresh tortillas) and freshly prepared on a wood burning stove.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0358.jpg

    On hour way to visit the grand old hacienda ruins, we run into this
    Tahamara native dressed in full regalia and resting on some rocks. They
    are very interesting dressers. The outfit consists of a loin cloth,
    loose blousy shirt, cowboy hat, and sandals made out of old tires glued
    to a piece of leather and secured with leather string to the foot.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0365.jpg

    Batopilas was "discovered" in the 1800's when Alex Sheppard, an American
    moved down there to open up a silver mine. It was very productive for
    many years. He loved the area so much he moved his entire family down
    there and eventually died there. His grand children still run a
    foundation which is raising money to restore the ruins of the Hacienda
    he lived and ran the company from.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0406.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0368.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0377.jpg

    Our "museum" guide points out four spots on the floor which were the
    footings of a pool table. We were embarrassed to ask how old he was,
    but he told us he saw the mine working in 1935.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0378.jpg

    A four seat throne room!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0392.jpg

    The rest of the day is spent goofing off and walking around town. I try
    my hand at a little free climbing. I think I'll stick to biking.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0413.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0414.jpg

    A silver mine shaft next to our hotel. It smelled pretty bad, so I
    didn't venture any further.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0423.jpg

    Day 5

    We cross the river, go through town, and begin traversing some very
    technical singletrack on our way to the town of Cerro Colorado in an
    adjoining canyon. This is the toughest trail we've ridden so far, but
    lots of fun!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0424.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0425.jpg

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    We'll have to do a few river crossings on this trail. At first I was
    hesitant to get my shoes wet for the rest of the trip, but the heat of
    day convinced me that the refreshing coolness of the river was worth it.
    At one point I stood in the river for ten minutes.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0443.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0444.jpg

    There was even some exposure to scare the crap out of me as it normally
    does.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0446.jpg

    It was an amazing trail built on top of and next to an aqueduct! We
    finally reach the town and here come the kids! Those darn shiny bikes
    again! Although the stickers certainly were a hit, the item most
    requested was not money or candy. Pencils would have made the biggest
    splash. If only I had known that, I would have brought a crate of them.
    My kids go though a pencil a day. These kids want to learn and the
    barest necessity of education is not available to them.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0448.jpg

    We eat lunch at a little shop here and then leave the bikes for a walk
    across a suspension bridge to the old silver grinder. Water powered
    huge boulders which smashed the rocks that were taken out of the mine.
    Then mercury was used to leach the silver from the dust. This mill is
    still functional when the water level is higher.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0456.jpg

    In other parts of Mexico and most definitely in the states, one would
    have to worry about leaving a $4000 bike alone. No need to worry when
    guard pig is on duty! She wasn't letting anyone near the bikes, not
    even the owners.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0459.jpg

    We cross the river for some more single track and for the first time, we
    get lost. However, not before several miles of rocky technical goodness
    which causes me to OTB two times.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0463.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0466.jpg

    The next hour is spent traversing mounds of foot wide ankle breaking
    river rocks until we get back to the trail. When we finally get back on
    track, I nearly step on this interesting group of insects. These a leaf
    cutter ants. They actually cut leaves and carry them back to their
    nests. I've seen them on TV, and now I get to see them up close!

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0470.jpg

    We finish up the day with more technical goodness back to the hotel. I
    crash pretty hard at one point turning heads with the loud thud and
    putting a nice bruise on my thigh.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0471.jpg

    Day 6

    It's time to leave the canyon. This means a 6000' climb out. We are
    given a little over three hours to get as far as we can. The idea is to
    climb until we rich the spot where we left the trailer. I'm psyched and
    head out. I reach the bridge in very good time. At first I thought I
    would just save my energy and wait for the van, but I'm feeling pretty
    good so I start heading up the switch backs. At one point a truck with
    a few Americans stop me. It's reporters from the LA Times doing a story
    on mountain biking in Copper Canyon. They ask me a whole bunch of
    questions, take a few pics, and continue on. It should be in the
    outdoors section around the end of March.

    I am trying my best now, but I'm getting tired. This is a long steep
    climb. My new goal is to reach a restaurant about half way between the
    bridge and the trailer. I hear an engine coming up the trail and try to
    move faster. I look over my shoulder and there is the van, so I attempt
    to sprint uphill. Yeah, right! The van catches me about one mile from
    the restaurant. We pick up two more just a short distance further
    leaving only one other attempting this foolish feat. Kerron, is a
    Western Spirit guide on vacation for this trip. He's based in Moab and
    a very strong XC rider. We catch up to him only 1.5 miles from the
    trailer. No one wants him to quit so we ride by. Shortly after we stop
    for the trailer, he rides in.

    After hooking up the trailer, we head for tonight lodge in Cusarare
    Canyon. There's no electricity and the potbelly stove is real cool,
    except when it goes out at 3:00 AM and leaves us with no heat.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0497.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0496.jpg

    After dumping our stuff in the room we head two miles down the road to a
    museum and another Mission.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0473.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0474.jpg

    At dinner, we are treated to a father and son team playing some great
    Mexican tunes by the fire.

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0500.jpg

    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0503.jpg

    A great way to end a very long day of riding!

    Day 7

    Today is our last day of riding and what is supposed to be another
    technical trail. We will ride from our lodge in Cusarare back into
    Creel. First we check out the local waterfall and some even try to ride
    across it.

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    http://www.schnauzers.ws/public/images_upload/IMG_0520.jpg

    Then it's through some rocky fields and into a huge lava slickrock
    playground. I didn't take too many photos of it because I was having
    way too much fun! Lot's of one and two foot dropoffs with narrow
    passages between rocks and mostly downhill. It's the kind of trail that
    really beats you up. Too much fun!

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    We're so tired after playing in the slickrock that we roadie it back in
    a paceline into town. Unlike road bikers, we looked pretty cool all
    mismatched with camelbacks on big bikes!

    Back at the hotel, the smiles across our faces show the delight we had
    all week. However, in the back of our minds we know it is time to leave
    this wonderful place. We're tired as we load up the van the next
    morning and bid a find farewell to the terrain, people, and culture that
    make this place so special.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
    Tags:


  2. JD

    JD Guest

    Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the best

    in
    > the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.

    The
    > Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    > Western Spirit guides for $350.



    <humongous snip>

    No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem to
    spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by being
    sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid to go
    down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.

    Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.

    JD happy in the good 'ol USA
     
  3. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    JD wrote:
    > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >
    >>Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the best

    >
    > in
    >
    >>the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.

    >
    > The
    >
    >>Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    >>Western Spirit guides for $350.

    >
    >
    >
    > <humongous snip>
    >
    > No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem to
    > spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by being
    > sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid to go
    > down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    >
    > Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.
    >
    > JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >


    LOL! I had no idea it translated to Henry. I changed in on my Website,
    thanks. I kept mentioning to my riding buddy about the Santa Crud.
    He's a rough rider, so I'm sure it will break (or at least the RockSux
    SID). He was doing some trials moves on it and all the while I'm
    thinking, "if only JD was here to see this".

    I didn't know there was a travel warning in effect. To be honest I felt
    more safe there, then here in Filthadelphia.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  4. Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > JD wrote:
    > > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > >
    > >>Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the

    best
    > >
    > > in
    > >
    > >>the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.

    > >
    > > The
    > >
    > >>Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    > >>Western Spirit guides for $350.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > <humongous snip>
    > >
    > > No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem

    to
    > > spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by

    being
    > > sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid

    to go
    > > down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    > >
    > > Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel

    warning.
    > >
    > > JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    > >

    >
    > LOL! I had no idea it translated to Henry. I changed in on my

    Website,
    > thanks. I kept mentioning to my riding buddy about the Santa Crud.
    > He's a rough rider, so I'm sure it will break (or at least the

    RockSux
    > SID). He was doing some trials moves on it and all the while I'm
    > thinking, "if only JD was here to see this".
    >
    > I didn't know there was a travel warning in effect. To be honest I

    felt
    > more safe there, then here in Filthadelphia.


    Travel warnings are listed here:

    <http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html>

    No travel warning for Mexico, but there is a Public Announcement,

    <http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_2100.html>
     
  5. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >> Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the best

    > in
    >> the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.

    > The
    >> Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    >> Western Spirit guides for $350.

    >
    >
    > <humongous snip>
    >
    > No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem to
    > spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by being
    > sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid to go
    > down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    >
    > Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.
    >
    > JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >


    yes, JD. Our Guvrment knows best...bbbwwwaaaahhhaaa
     
  6. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >> JD wrote:
    >> > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the

    > best
    >> >
    >> > in
    >> >
    >> >>the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.
    >> >
    >> > The
    >> >
    >> >>Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    >> >>Western Spirit guides for $350.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > <humongous snip>
    >> >
    >> > No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem

    > to
    >> > spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by

    > being
    >> > sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid

    > to go
    >> > down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    >> >
    >> > Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel

    > warning.
    >> >
    >> > JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >> >

    >>
    >> LOL! I had no idea it translated to Henry. I changed in on my

    > Website,
    >> thanks. I kept mentioning to my riding buddy about the Santa Crud.
    >> He's a rough rider, so I'm sure it will break (or at least the

    > RockSux
    >> SID). He was doing some trials moves on it and all the while I'm
    >> thinking, "if only JD was here to see this".
    >>
    >> I didn't know there was a travel warning in effect. To be honest I

    > felt
    >> more safe there, then here in Filthadelphia.

    >
    > Travel warnings are listed here:
    >
    > <http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html>
    >
    > No travel warning for Mexico, but there is a Public Announcement,
    >
    > <http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_2100.html>


    Basically what your saying is that, yet again, JD replies to something he
    knows nothing about....imagine that...
     
  7. JD

    JD Guest

    Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > JD wrote:
    > > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > >
    > >>Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the

    best
    > >
    > > in
    > >
    > >>the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.

    > >
    > > The
    > >
    > >>Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    > >>Western Spirit guides for $350.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > <humongous snip>
    > >
    > > No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem

    to
    > > spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by

    being
    > > sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid

    to go
    > > down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    > >
    > > Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel

    warning.
    > >
    > > JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    > >

    >
    > LOL! I had no idea it translated to Henry. I changed in on my

    Website,
    > thanks. I kept mentioning to my riding buddy about the Santa Crud.
    > He's a rough rider, so I'm sure it will break (or at least the

    RockSux
    > SID). He was doing some trials moves on it and all the while I'm
    > thinking, "if only JD was here to see this".



    Oh man, it has a SAD on it? Double jepoardy. At least it's getting
    ridden compared to many of the roofrack decorations in the USA that
    have santa crud emblazoned on them.

    > I didn't know there was a travel warning in effect. To be honest I

    felt
    > more safe there, then here in Filthadelphia.



    Mexico = Peligroso right now, especially near border towns like Nuevo
    Laredo, Cuidad Juarez, etc.

    JD
     
  8. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    JD wrote:
    > Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >
    >>JD wrote:
    >>
    >>>Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Enrice is a very accomplished rider. He is only 25, one of the

    >
    > best
    >
    >>>in
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>the area, and serves as a guide for other tour operators as well.
    >>>
    >>>The
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Santa Cruz Superlight he is riding was given to him by one of the
    >>>>Western Spirit guides for $350.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>><humongous snip>
    >>>
    >>>No wonder Mexico is pissed off at us. First, gabachos can't seem

    >
    > to
    >
    >>>spell Enrique (Henry) correctly and then they get ripped off by

    >
    > being
    >
    >>>sold a santa crud for over twice what it is worth. I'd be afraid

    >
    > to go
    >
    >>>down there for fear of retribution when Hank's bike breaks.
    >>>
    >>>Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel

    >
    > warning.
    >
    >>>JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >>>

    >>
    >>LOL! I had no idea it translated to Henry. I changed in on my

    >
    > Website,
    >
    >>thanks. I kept mentioning to my riding buddy about the Santa Crud.
    >>He's a rough rider, so I'm sure it will break (or at least the

    >
    > RockSux
    >
    >>SID). He was doing some trials moves on it and all the while I'm
    >>thinking, "if only JD was here to see this".

    >
    >
    >
    > Oh man, it has a SAD on it? Double jepoardy. At least it's getting
    > ridden compared to many of the roofrack decorations in the USA that
    > have santa crud emblazoned on them.
    >
    >
    >>I didn't know there was a travel warning in effect. To be honest I

    >
    > felt
    >
    >>more safe there, then here in Filthadelphia.

    >
    >
    >
    > Mexico = Peligroso right now, especially near border towns like Nuevo
    > Laredo, Cuidad Juarez, etc.
    >
    > JD
    >


    Yeah, we came across through Juarez. It's not exactly Beverly Hills.
    At the US border guard station we saw quite a few being taken away in cuffs.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  9. Slack

    Slack Guest

    On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 15:14:03 -0800, Dave W <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.
    >>
    >> JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >>

    >
    > yes, JD. Our Guvrment knows best...bbbwwwaaaahhhaaa
    >
    >

    You ever been there. Mexico has always been a risk taking adventure, even
    when we would drive down there for a surf trips, you could run into
    problems.

    And lately, there have been kidnappings and murders long many of the
    boarder towns. It is a serious warning... Mexico is a both very beautiful
    and hideously ugly at the same time.
    --
    Slack
     
  10. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    "Slack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 15:14:03 -0800, Dave W <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.
    >>>
    >>> JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >>>

    >>
    >> yes, JD. Our Guvrment knows best...bbbwwwaaaahhhaaa
    >>
    >>

    > You ever been there. Mexico has always been a risk taking adventure, even
    > when we would drive down there for a surf trips, you could run into
    > problems.
    >
    > And lately, there have been kidnappings and murders long many of the
    > boarder towns. It is a serious warning... Mexico is a both very beautiful
    > and hideously ugly at the same time.
    > --
    > Slack


    Hmm, sounds like Atlanta....

    Uh, yeah. I've been there. Almost yearly. My Grandfather was born in Nuevo
    Laredo...Now resides in San Antonio...as do the remaining brothers of 8 that
    became naturalized after WWII due to thier service for our country...and
    where I was born. Wilford Hall....

    It's alway's a serious warning for a gringo....never needed my goverment, or
    JD to tell me so...neither did you on your midnite runs to TJ, or where ever
    I assume...

    "Desperado" is not that far off in the streets of ol' mexico these day's I
    hear...

    Dave (mothers maiden name is Guiterrez!)
     
  11. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    Dave W wrote:
    > "Slack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 15:14:03 -0800, Dave W <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>Very scenic, but not worth ignoring a State Department travel warning.
    >>>>
    >>>>JD happy in the good 'ol USA
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>yes, JD. Our Guvrment knows best...bbbwwwaaaahhhaaa
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>You ever been there. Mexico has always been a risk taking adventure, even
    >>when we would drive down there for a surf trips, you could run into
    >>problems.
    >>
    >>And lately, there have been kidnappings and murders long many of the
    >>boarder towns. It is a serious warning... Mexico is a both very beautiful
    >>and hideously ugly at the same time.
    >>--
    >>Slack

    >
    >
    > Hmm, sounds like Atlanta....
    >
    > Uh, yeah. I've been there. Almost yearly. My Grandfather was born in Nuevo
    > Laredo...Now resides in San Antonio...as do the remaining brothers of 8 that
    > became naturalized after WWII due to thier service for our country...and
    > where I was born. Wilford Hall....
    >
    > It's alway's a serious warning for a gringo....never needed my goverment, or
    > JD to tell me so...neither did you on your midnite runs to TJ, or where ever
    > I assume...
    >
    > "Desperado" is not that far off in the streets of ol' mexico these day's I
    > hear...
    >
    > Dave (mothers maiden name is Guiterrez!)
    >
    >


    Border town was ugly, but it didn't seem all that bad in terms or shady
    characters. Also, traveling in groups (12 in our van) makes it much
    safer. I don't think I would go in their alone. Far more "Americans"
    are kidnapped in the US on a daily basis than in Mexico. If you are
    really scared, you can get abduction insurance. It's not expensive.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  12. JD

    JD Guest

    Slack wrote:
    > You ever been there. Mexico has always been a risk taking adventure,

    even
    > when we would drive down there for a surf trips, you could run into
    > problems.



    I almost had an "incident" in Baja in 1986 while on a surf trip, but
    was saved by a large, shiny Dacor scuba knife and 1,000 yard stare.
    Always bring a bigger and shinier knife to a knife fight...then you
    don't even have to fight.

    JD
     
  13. Monique Y. Mudama wrote:

    > What exactly does abduction do for me?


    Free trip to space?

    Bill "server ain't postin' nuttin' anyway, so wtf" S.
     
  14. On 2005-03-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >
    > Border town was ugly, but it didn't seem all that bad in terms or shady
    > characters. Also, traveling in groups (12 in our van) makes it much safer.
    > I don't think I would go in their alone. Far more "Americans" are kidnapped
    > in the US on a daily basis than in Mexico. If you are really scared, you
    > can get abduction insurance. It's not expensive.


    Um.

    So if I get car insurance, it just means that if something happens to my car,
    they'll pay for the damages.

    What exactly does abduction do for me?

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  15. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    > On 2005-03-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >
    >>Border town was ugly, but it didn't seem all that bad in terms or shady
    >>characters. Also, traveling in groups (12 in our van) makes it much safer.
    >>I don't think I would go in their alone. Far more "Americans" are kidnapped
    >>in the US on a daily basis than in Mexico. If you are really scared, you
    >>can get abduction insurance. It's not expensive.

    >
    >
    > Um.
    >
    > So if I get car insurance, it just means that if something happens to my car,
    > they'll pay for the damages.
    >
    > What exactly does abduction do for me?
    >


    Here's how it works:

    You pay a company a premium based upon how much you want. They
    recommend $1,000,000. I think the premium was something ridiculously
    low, like $100. If you get abducted, you hand the kidnappers a contact
    card to call to set up the ransome. The insurance company arranges an
    exchange location and the authorities are never involved. The abductors
    get the cash and you are taken back home by the insurance company. The
    insurance also covers your rehabilitation if you are injured, plus some
    other things.


    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  16. Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    >> On 2005-03-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >>
    >>> Border town was ugly, but it didn't seem all that bad in terms or
    >>> shady characters. Also, traveling in groups (12 in our van) makes
    >>> it much safer. I don't think I would go in their alone. Far more
    >>> "Americans" are kidnapped in the US on a daily basis than in
    >>> Mexico. If you are really scared, you can get abduction insurance.
    >>> It's not expensive.

    >>
    >>
    >> Um.
    >>
    >> So if I get car insurance, it just means that if something happens
    >> to my car, they'll pay for the damages.
    >>
    >> What exactly does abduction do for me?
    >>

    >
    > Here's how it works:
    >
    > You pay a company a premium based upon how much you want. They
    > recommend $1,000,000. I think the premium was something ridiculously
    > low, like $100. If you get abducted, you hand the kidnappers a
    > contact card to call to set up the ransome. The insurance company
    > arranges an exchange location and the authorities are never involved.
    > The abductors get the cash and you are taken back home by the
    > insurance company. The insurance also covers your rehabilitation if
    > you are injured, plus some other things.


    Sounds like a perfect prescription for fraud.

    Bill "nuttin' gettin' posted...wah!" S.
     
  17. Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    > What exactly does abduction do for me?


    Free trip to space.

    Bill "trying to post from Google cuz RR ain't doin' SQUAT" S.
     
  18. Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    > What exactly does abduction do for me?


    Free trip to space.

    Bill "trying to post from Google cuz RR ain't doin' SQUAT" S.
     
  19. "Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    >> On 2005-03-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >>
    >>>Border town was ugly, but it didn't seem all that bad in terms or shady
    >>>characters. Also, traveling in groups (12 in our van) makes it much
    >>>safer.
    >>>I don't think I would go in their alone. Far more "Americans" are
    >>>kidnapped
    >>>in the US on a daily basis than in Mexico. If you are really scared, you
    >>>can get abduction insurance. It's not expensive.

    >>
    >>
    >> Um.
    >>
    >> So if I get car insurance, it just means that if something happens to my
    >> car,
    >> they'll pay for the damages.
    >>
    >> What exactly does abduction do for me?
    >>

    >
    > Here's how it works:
    >
    > You pay a company a premium based upon how much you want. They recommend
    > $1,000,000. I think the premium was something ridiculously low, like
    > $100. If you get abducted, you hand the kidnappers a contact card to call
    > to set up the ransome. The insurance company arranges an exchange
    > location and the authorities are never involved. The abductors get the
    > cash and you are taken back home by the insurance company. The insurance
    > also covers your rehabilitation if you are injured, plus some other
    > things.
    >
    >
    > --

    High reward little risk.

    No wonder they abduct people down there. Have have made it easy for the
    criminals to get rewarded and authoritys don't get envolved.
     
  20. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Sounds like a perfect prescription for fraud.

    Bill "Google-bound" S.
     
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