Servicing older Shimano 8sp STI

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Greg, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. Greg

    Greg Guest

    I have a couple of sets of 600 Ultegra 8sp STI levers from the early to
    mid 90's. They have both seen thousands of miles and have spent the
    last 4 or 5 years in a box. I am building a "beater" bike for nasty
    weather riding and trying to piece it together with stuff I have,
    including these shifters. They seem to downshift fine, but the shifter
    doesn't always engage properly on up-shifts and I need to throw the
    lever several times for the mechanism to "catch" and engage the
    derailleur. If I apply a light pulling tension on the cable with my
    other hand as I shift, it seems to engage more reliably. I seem to
    remember an issue with either this model of shifter, the derailleur, or
    both. I can't seem to recall if these are serviceable or disposable.

    Can any of you fine folks share any tips on servicing, repairing or
    just making them work a little better?

    TIA.
    Greg
     
    Tags:


  2. Greg wrote:
    > I have a couple of sets of 600 Ultegra 8sp STI levers from the early to
    > mid 90's. They have both seen thousands of miles and have spent the
    > last 4 or 5 years in a box. I am building a "beater" bike for nasty
    > weather riding and trying to piece it together with stuff I have,
    > including these shifters. They seem to downshift fine, but the shifter
    > doesn't always engage properly on up-shifts and I need to throw the
    > lever several times for the mechanism to "catch" and engage the
    > derailleur. If I apply a light pulling tension on the cable with my
    > other hand as I shift, it seems to engage more reliably. I seem to
    > remember an issue with either this model of shifter, the derailleur, or
    > both. I can't seem to recall if these are serviceable or disposable.
    >
    > Can any of you fine folks share any tips on servicing, repairing or
    > just making them work a little better?
    >
    > TIA.
    > Greg


    Like all STI, they are not repairable. You could try to flush well with
    a good spray lube, that may help, but when they 'break', they are done
    and in spite of those who say ya can take them apart and repair them,
    no parts available, never has been. They have been throw away since the
    first model. Very clever of shimano, they fail and upgrade of other
    parts is the only option....BTW, I just overhauled a pair of first
    generation ERGO, from 1991, the other day....
     
  3. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    Greg wrote:
    > I have a couple of sets of 600 Ultegra 8sp STI levers from the early to
    > mid 90's. They have both seen thousands of miles and have spent the
    > last 4 or 5 years in a box. I am building a "beater" bike for nasty
    > weather riding and trying to piece it together with stuff I have,
    > including these shifters. They seem to downshift fine, but the shifter
    > doesn't always engage properly on up-shifts and I need to throw the
    > lever several times for the mechanism to "catch" and engage the
    > derailleur. If I apply a light pulling tension on the cable with my
    > other hand as I shift, it seems to engage more reliably. I seem to
    > remember an issue with either this model of shifter, the derailleur, or
    > both. I can't seem to recall if these are serviceable or disposable.
    >
    > Can any of you fine folks share any tips on servicing, repairing or
    > just making them work a little better?
    >
    > TIA.
    > Greg


    They're generally disposable but it's mostly because nobody supplies
    replacement parts for them. In my experience, the thing that usually
    breaks are certain eensy little springs. I would guess wildly that
    neither of yours actually have any broken parts.

    I'm not an expert in STI resuscitation but I've gotten more life out of
    at least one pair of flat bar STI's having problems similar to what you
    describe by taking the more superficial parts off to get access to the
    main guts of the shifter and lubing everything. Most or all Shimano
    shifters seem to be designed to have a fairly well sealed-off "stack"
    of parts that do the actual shifting, which are accessible by removing
    the covers, topcaps, etc. The only road STI surgery I've done was on
    some RSX's and it was a while ago, but I know that in general they were
    like this as well. You can dismantle things more fully for cleaning if
    you wish - if you have a system to remember how to put it all back
    together right, it's not really as bad as it's reputed to be.
     
  4. here here!

    I've attempted repair on several different shimano index click shifting
    systems. Mostly out of curiosity with little hope of success.

    1: the grease shimano uses tends to get hard and sticky over time.
    That can interfere with the clicking and shifting. Start with a spray
    solvent, like wd40 and shoot the spray inside alot. Repeat. Try
    shifing a bunch to try to work the crud out. After waiting a couple of
    days for the solvent to drip out or disvole, spray in a decent chain
    lube. Lube regularly.

    2: no parts available unless you have a spare unit to canabilize.

    3: The early 8-speed design (600/ultegra/dura ace) a real bugger to
    reassemble. Okay, iv'e never succeded. I did find the reason for
    failure, a pin slide out of place. Easly reset, just impossible to
    reassemble.

    4: The 1999+ mostly plastic ultegra 9 speed design just wears out
    quick. I did manage to reassemble it. Nothing to replace See #2.
    These need lube! Once they start to act up, it's all over. Lube yours
    now. This is the same model that has the rattle in the nose cone. The
    1999 ultegra design is still around.

    5: STX mtb flat bar model. Failed due to grease petrifiation. Took it
    all a part only to find that #1 would have worked just fine. The rapid
    fire design is much easier to reassemble than the sti but you don't
    have to. See #1.
     
  5. Greg wrote:
    > I have a couple of sets of 600 Ultegra 8sp STI levers from the early
    > to mid 90's. They have both seen thousands of miles and have spent
    > the last 4 or 5 years in a box. I am building a "beater" bike for
    > nasty weather riding and trying to piece it together with stuff I
    > have, including these shifters. They seem to downshift fine, but the
    > shifter doesn't always engage properly on up-shifts and I need to
    > throw the lever several times for the mechanism to "catch" and engage
    > the derailleur. If I apply a light pulling tension on the cable with
    > my other hand as I shift, it seems to engage more reliably. I seem to
    > remember an issue with either this model of shifter, the derailleur,
    > or both. I can't seem to recall if these are serviceable or
    > disposable.
    >
    > Can any of you fine folks share any tips on servicing, repairing or
    > just making them work a little better?


    Yes. To me it seems that not only is your shifter gummed up, but it seems
    that your cables and housing may be gummed up and draggy, too.
    Replacement is probably not necessary.

    First, using a spray lube, get lube way into the innards of the shifter.
    Actuate the shifter many, many, many times until the fumes begin to make you
    lightheaded. Wait. Actuate the shifter again. Wait. Repeat until it
    begins working well again or until you get frustrated.

    Next, consider installing new cables and housing, or lubing your existing
    cables, which will allow the derailleur to transmit more tension on the
    cable all the way to the shifter instead of wasting it on overcoming static
    friction inside the housing. Try lubing your cables first, and then seeing
    how it works.

    If it doesn't, the next step involves freeing up the derailleur so that the
    spring tension of the derailleur can work its best at tensioning the cables.
    Spray WD-40/GT-85 into the pivot points of the derailleur, where the two
    plates of the parallelogram connect to the knuckles. Shift into the hardest
    gear, and then, with your hands off the shifters, manually push the
    derailleur all the way across the cog range while pedaling. Alternatively,
    you can take the rear wheel out and just actuate the derailleur manually
    without having to endure all the noise and wear of actually shifting. If
    you use this alternate method, unscrew the limit screws so that you're
    actuating the derailleur past its required high limit. This ensures that
    when the wheel is actually in the dropouts, the derailleur will make it all
    the way out to the smallest cog without corrosion/dirt/sand/crud resistance.
    Along the same lines, make sure that you pull on the derailleur outwards,
    too (the same direction the spring pulls it). Actuate the derailleur 20,
    30, 100 times until it begins to move freely, or at least more freely.
    Flush the pivots regularly. Put the wheel back in if you took it out. Test
    ride. Report back here... we're interested to know.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  6. Greg

    Greg Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > Greg wrote:
    > > I have a couple of sets of 600 Ultegra 8sp STI levers from the early
    > > to mid 90's. They have both seen thousands of miles and have spent
    > > the last 4 or 5 years in a box. I am building a "beater" bike for
    > > nasty weather riding and trying to piece it together with stuff I
    > > have, including these shifters. They seem to downshift fine, but the
    > > shifter doesn't always engage properly on up-shifts and I need to
    > > throw the lever several times for the mechanism to "catch" and engage
    > > the derailleur. If I apply a light pulling tension on the cable with
    > > my other hand as I shift, it seems to engage more reliably. I seem to
    > > remember an issue with either this model of shifter, the derailleur,
    > > or both. I can't seem to recall if these are serviceable or
    > > disposable.
    > >
    > > Can any of you fine folks share any tips on servicing, repairing or
    > > just making them work a little better?

    >
    > Yes. To me it seems that not only is your shifter gummed up, but it seems
    > that your cables and housing may be gummed up and draggy, too.
    > Replacement is probably not necessary.
    >
    > First, using a spray lube, get lube way into the innards of the shifter.
    > Actuate the shifter many, many, many times until the fumes begin to make you
    > lightheaded. Wait. Actuate the shifter again. Wait. Repeat until it
    > begins working well again or until you get frustrated.
    >
    > Next, consider installing new cables and housing, or lubing your existing
    > cables, which will allow the derailleur to transmit more tension on the
    > cable all the way to the shifter instead of wasting it on overcoming static
    > friction inside the housing. Try lubing your cables first, and then seeing
    > how it works.
    >
    > If it doesn't, the next step involves freeing up the derailleur so that the
    > spring tension of the derailleur can work its best at tensioning the cables.
    > Spray WD-40/GT-85 into the pivot points of the derailleur, where the two
    > plates of the parallelogram connect to the knuckles. Shift into the hardest
    > gear, and then, with your hands off the shifters, manually push the
    > derailleur all the way across the cog range while pedaling. Alternatively,
    > you can take the rear wheel out and just actuate the derailleur manually
    > without having to endure all the noise and wear of actually shifting. If
    > you use this alternate method, unscrew the limit screws so that you're
    > actuating the derailleur past its required high limit. This ensures that
    > when the wheel is actually in the dropouts, the derailleur will make it all
    > the way out to the smallest cog without corrosion/dirt/sand/crud resistance.
    > Along the same lines, make sure that you pull on the derailleur outwards,
    > too (the same direction the spring pulls it). Actuate the derailleur 20,
    > 30, 100 times until it begins to move freely, or at least more freely.
    > Flush the pivots regularly. Put the wheel back in if you took it out. Test
    > ride. Report back here... we're interested to know.
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training


    Thanks for the detailed response. I had already done most of what you
    suggest prior to my post, but it's good to see that I covered
    everything.

    Shifters are presently partially disassembled with the main "cluster"
    of innards soaking in a dish of WD-40....

    Report to follow.

    Greg
     
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