SRAM quicklinks not feeling so quick now.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ant, Jun 14, 2003.

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  1. Ant

    Ant Guest

    in the past, i have posted to the effect of how SRAM links are the best thing to happen to my
    drivetrain since fixed gear. i read many posts about difficulties getting quicklinks off, but passed
    them off as my own experiences had been easy. every single chain i run has a quicklink, and ive
    installed many on other folks' bikes in the past. until a couple weeks ago, they would all install
    easily with a slight tug, and come off with a pinch and a jerk.

    ive just taken a job at a shop, and have installed a bunch of these chains in the last few days.
    pc-48, like what i run, mostly. these quicklinks, technically identical to what ive been using, are
    way more difficult to deal with. to lock them, i have to move the link to the top of the drivetrain
    and use a pedal as a lever. and i can't get them off. period. (or, at least the one i tried to get
    off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop, and it is nto a shop devoid of experience. and
    we tried Everything. including using two people.

    what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.

    regards, anthony
     
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  2. Gregr

    Gregr Guest

    On 14 Jun 2003 02:55:33 -0700, [email protected] (ant) wrote:
    >
    >what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    >release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.
    >

    In my expereince, SRAM's quality control is not the best with their chains. I have seen several bad
    batches of chains hit the shelves in recent years.

    Mic the chain and compare to one that is good.

    Also make sure you not using a 9sp powerlink on a 8sp chain.

    G
     
  3. anthony-<< at least the one i tried to get off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop, and
    it is nto a shop devoid of experience. and we tried Everything. including using two people.

    Spray them with WD-40, use a needle nose pliers in the center to push the links together and use a
    sharpened spoke to pry the post away, to open them. A dirty one can be a challenge.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    > release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.

    I had a brand new one recently that wouldn't close on the chain it came with. I've seen a lot of
    variation in others, with some opening easy, some almost impossible, even when cleaned. I think they
    definitely have a manufacturing tolerance problem.
     
  5. Lee Bower

    Lee Bower Guest

    I have no problem taking them apart. In fact, on my mountain bike (9s with gold link) they come
    apart every time I go down a fast bumpy section. Sometimes the link stays with the chain when it
    drops, other times it's lost. Needless to say, I carry several extras with me on trail. I'm going
    back to a regular Shimano chain, these Powerlinks aren't reliable enough for offroad use.

    No problem on the road bike. I have to use pliers to split that one.

    Lee Bower

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > in the past, i have posted to the effect of how SRAM links are the best thing to happen to my
    > drivetrain since fixed gear. i read many posts about difficulties getting quicklinks off, but
    > passed them off as my own experiences had been easy. every single chain i run has a quicklink, and
    > ive installed many on other folks' bikes in the past. until a couple weeks ago, they would all
    > install easily with a slight tug, and come off with a pinch and a jerk.
    >
    > ive just taken a job at a shop, and have installed a bunch of these chains in the last few days.
    > pc-48, like what i run, mostly. these quicklinks, technically identical to what ive been using,
    > are way more difficult to deal with. to lock them, i have to move the link to the top of the
    > drivetrain and use a pedal as a lever. and i can't get them off. period. (or, at least the one i
    > tried to get off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop, and it is nto a shop devoid of
    > experience. and we tried Everything. including using two people.
    >
    > what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    > release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.
    >
    > regards, anthony
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Java Man (Espressopithecus)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > I carry a small home-made tool in my tool pouch to hold the chain slack in the link area when I
    > want to remove or replace it. It is a simple piece of coat-hanger wire bent into a very wide "U",
    > about 3" across and about 1/2" high. I find it helps.

    It's easier to shift into the smallest sprocket & chainring, then derail the chain to the inside on
    to the BB shell, all the slack you need.
     
  7. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > anthony-<< at least the one i tried to get off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop,
    > and it is nto a shop devoid of experience. and we tried Everything. including using two people.
    >
    > Spray them with WD-40, use a needle nose pliers in the center to push the links together and use a
    > sharpened spoke to pry the post away, to open them. A dirty one can be a challenge.

    Could you elaborate? I mean, what exactly are you doing with the sharpened spoke? Im definitely
    going to have a run in with these slow-links in the near future, and id like to have all the tricks
    up my sleeve. Anyone else?

    to clarify, re: other posts
    1) i understand that many SRAM links are quite easy and loose. i have three such links on my own
    bikes. i have never had to use a tool, or to spend more than 10 seconds, to release them no
    matter how dirty, grungy, and caked with muck they were. Its just that the last four ones I dealt
    with were *all* ridiculously tight compared to what im used to

    2) the particular chain I tried to pry apart- it was new. No dirt. The only thing on it was factory
    grease. I installed it, and then realized I needed to replace the derailleur. I tried my usual
    trick- holding the chain in a “z” with the quick link in the center, and pushing the
    pins together while p[ushing the plates together. No juice. Then I tried again, about 10 times,
    and let some other mechs try. No juice(s). then I tried having someone else try to pusht hem
    together while I pressed plates together with pliers. Nothing. The link was the correct speed for
    the chain, I assume, as it came in the package (pc-48), and was silver colored, (aren’t the
    9spd versions gold?)

    (siiigh). Maybe ill call SRAM and let them know I’m unimpressed. I could ask them to sell me
    some ‘loose’ links.

    The whole post was really a wonder about what was the norm. I wonder if these tight links are what
    everyone is dealing with, or perhaps it turns out that I was living in a platonic cave of SRAMlinks,
    and all my easy friendly previous links were the ‘bad’ batch.

    I only tried to take apart one of these tight chains, so technically I don’t know if they will
    all prove so difficult. However, im guessing they will, as all of them required me to use the
    drivetrain to close the link initially, whereas I would normally just slip them together.

    Curious, sorry for the long post about trivial things,

    anthony
     
  8. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Lee Bower" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:_fTGa.44453$rO.4394[email protected]...

    > I have no problem taking them apart. In fact, on my mountain bike (9s with gold link) they come
    > apart every time I go down a fast bumpy section. Sometimes the link stays with the chain when it
    > drops, other times it's lost. Needless to say, I carry several extras with me on trail. I'm going
    > back to a regular Shimano chain, these Powerlinks aren't reliable enough for offroad use.

    I have had one come off, and it's still a mystery how. I suspect the chain was whipping around on a
    bumpy downhill, and it managed to whip the link apart in a one-in-a-million occurance. I didn't
    trust the things for awhile, but I don't worry about it anymore.

    Matt O.
     
  9. Lee Bower

    Lee Bower Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Lee Bower" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > I have no problem taking them apart. In fact, on my mountain bike (9s
    with
    > > gold link) they come apart every time I go down a fast bumpy section. Sometimes the link stays
    > > with the chain when it drops, other times it's lost. Needless to say, I carry several extras
    > > with me on trail. I'm
    going
    > > back to a regular Shimano chain, these Powerlinks aren't reliable enough
    for
    > > offroad use.
    >
    > I have had one come off, and it's still a mystery how. I suspect the
    chain was
    > whipping around on a bumpy downhill, and it managed to whip the link apart
    in a
    > one-in-a-million occurance. I didn't trust the things for awhile, but I
    don't
    > worry about it anymore.
    >
    > Matt O.
    >
    >

    When I first lost one on my downhill bike, I thought it was a fluke. It had seen many months of
    faithful service. And it hasn't had a problem since.

    With my new long-travel cross country bike (Intense UZZI SLX), I lost the link on the first three
    out of first four rides (much better odds if I were playing the lottery). Yes, it is the chain
    whipping around. That frame seems to cause the chain to drop off the front chainrings as well more
    than any other bike I've had. I'm going to try the Heim 3 Guide to see if that helps [the chain
    whipping/dropping and noise].

    Lee Bower
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > in the past, i have posted to the effect of how SRAM links are the best thing to happen to my
    > drivetrain since fixed gear. i read many posts about difficulties getting quicklinks off, but
    > passed them off as my own experiences had been easy. every single chain i run has a quicklink, and
    > ive installed many on other folks' bikes in the past. until a couple weeks ago, they would all
    > install easily with a slight tug, and come off with a pinch and a jerk.
    >
    > ive just taken a job at a shop, and have installed a bunch of these chains in the last few days.
    > pc-48, like what i run, mostly. these quicklinks, technically identical to what ive been using,
    > are way more difficult to deal with. to lock them, i have to move the link to the top of the
    > drivetrain and use a pedal as a lever. and i can't get them off. period. (or, at least the one i
    > tried to get off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop, and it is nto a shop devoid of
    > experience. and we tried Everything. including using two people.
    >
    > what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    > release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.

    Installing a PC48 snaplink I insert one arm of needlenose into the chain ( as a cog tooth would )
    and twist to lock. It's quick. To release I use a six inch ChanneLock and press on diagonally
    opposed corners of the link.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    I've been using them for several years and I think they've changed a little lately. I have to use
    common pliers to open them now, whereas before I could reliably get them apart with finger pressure.
    Are you squeezing them diagonally? I find I have to get them just right, with the pressure on the
    opposite sides as the "keyholes" (behind them).

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (ant) writes:

    >in the past, i have posted to the effect of how SRAM links are the best thing to happen to my
    >drivetrain since fixed gear. i read many posts about difficulties getting quicklinks off, but
    >passed them off as my own experiences had been easy. every single chain i run has a quicklink, and
    >ive installed many on other folks' bikes in the past. until a couple weeks ago, they would all
    >install easily with a slight tug, and come off with a pinch and a jerk.
    >
    >ive just taken a job at a shop, and have installed a bunch of these chains in the last few days.
    >pc-48, like what i run, mostly. these quicklinks, technically identical to what ive been using, are
    >way more difficult to deal with. to lock them, i have to move the link to the top of the drivetrain
    >and use a pedal as a lever. and i can't get them off. period. (or, at least the one i tried to get
    >off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop, and it is nto a shop devoid of experience.
    >and we tried Everything. including using two people.
    >
    >what gives? others noticing this? just a bad batch? will drivetrain wear make for a buttery-smooth
    >release in time? i dont look forward to having to use chaintools on quicklink-equipped bikes.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  12. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 14 Jun 2003 12:17:43 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    >anthony-<< at least the one i tried to get off yesterday). nor could any other mech in the shop,
    >and it is nto a shop devoid of experience. and we tried Everything. including using two people.
    >
    >Spray them with WD-40, use a needle nose pliers in the center to push the links together and use a
    >sharpened spoke to pry the post away, to open them.

    Then replace with a Forster (nee Craig) Super Link.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  13. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2003 19:06:26 GMT, "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >They do vary in their tightness, and the SRAM ones seem tighter in general than the original
    >Craig ones.

    Note that the SRAM and Forster (originally Craig) links connect differently. The Forster Super Link
    doen't need to have the two halves of the link pressed together to release.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  14. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    ant <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > The whole post was really a wonder about what was the norm. I wonder if these tight links are what
    > everyone is dealing with,

    Not in my experience - every one has gone together easily, and come apart easily. I have neither
    needed to use tools nor 'force'.

    Hope this helps your 'survey', and also hope you don't have the problem again.

    Shaun aRe
     
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